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Hägglund, Anna-Carin
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Nord, C., Jones, I., Garcia-Maestre, M., Hägglund, A.-C. & Carlsson, L. (2024). Reduced mTORC1-signaling in progenitor cells leads to retinal lamination deficits. Developmental Dynamics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced mTORC1-signaling in progenitor cells leads to retinal lamination deficits
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2024 (English)In: Developmental Dynamics, ISSN 1058-8388, E-ISSN 1097-0177Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Neuronal lamination is a hallmark of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and underlies connectivity and function. Initial formation of this tissue architecture involves the integration of various signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation and migration of neural progenitor cells.

Results: Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 mediates critical roles during neuronal lamination using the mouse retina as a model system. Down-regulation of mTORC1-signaling in retinal progenitor cells by conditional deletion of Rptor led to decreases in proliferation and increased apoptosis during embryogenesis. These developmental deficits preceded aberrant lamination in adult animals which was best exemplified by the fusion of the outer and inner nuclear layer and the absence of an outer plexiform layer. Moreover, ganglion cell axons originating from each Rptor-ablated retina appeared to segregate to an equal degree at the optic chiasm with both contralateral and ipsilateral projections displaying overlapping termination topographies within several retinorecipient nuclei. In combination, these visual pathway defects led to visually mediated behavioral deficits.

Conclusions: This study establishes a critical role for mTORC1-signaling during retinal lamination and demonstrates that this pathway regulates diverse developmental mechanisms involved in driving the stratified arrangement of neurons during CNS development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
Chx10, dLGN, lamination, mTORC1, retina, Rptor
National Category
Neurosciences Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223249 (URN)10.1002/dvdy.707 (DOI)001193263800001 ()38546215 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189534154 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-18 Created: 2024-04-18 Last updated: 2024-04-18
Chakraborty, C., Nissen, I., Vincent, C. A., Hägglund, A.-C., Hörnblad, A. & Remeseiro, S. (2023). Rewiring of the promoter-enhancer interactome and regulatory landscape in glioblastoma orchestrates gene expression underlying neurogliomal synaptic communication. Nature Communications, 14(1), Article ID 6446.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rewiring of the promoter-enhancer interactome and regulatory landscape in glioblastoma orchestrates gene expression underlying neurogliomal synaptic communication
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2023 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 6446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chromatin organization controls transcription by modulating 3D-interactions between enhancers and promoters in the nucleus. Alterations in epigenetic states and 3D-chromatin organization result in gene expression changes contributing to cancer. Here, we map the promoter-enhancer interactome and regulatory landscape of glioblastoma, the most aggressive primary brain tumour. Our data reveals profound rewiring of promoter-enhancer interactions, chromatin accessibility and redistribution of histone marks in glioblastoma. This leads to loss of long-range regulatory interactions and overall activation of promoters, which orchestrate changes in the expression of genes associated to glutamatergic synapses, axon guidance, axonogenesis and chromatin remodelling. SMAD3 and PITX1 emerge as major transcription factors controlling genes related to synapse organization and axon guidance. Inhibition of SMAD3 and neuronal activity stimulation cooperate to promote proliferation of glioblastoma cells in co-culture with glutamatergic neurons, and in mice bearing patient-derived xenografts. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the regulatory networks that mediate neurogliomal synaptic communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216189 (URN)10.1038/s41467-023-41919-x (DOI)37833281 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174178290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Jones, I., Hägglund, A.-C. & Carlsson, L. (2022). Reduced mTORC1-signaling in retinal ganglion cells leads to vascular retinopathy. Developmental Dynamics, 251(2), 321-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced mTORC1-signaling in retinal ganglion cells leads to vascular retinopathy
2022 (English)In: Developmental Dynamics, ISSN 1058-8388, E-ISSN 1097-0177, Vol. 251, no 2, p. 321-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The coordinated wiring of neurons, glia and endothelial cells into neurovascular units is critical for central nervous system development. This is best exemplified in the mammalian retina where interneurons, astrocytes and retinal ganglion cells sculpt their vascular environment to meet the metabolic demands of visual function. Identifying the molecular networks that underlie neurovascular unit formation is an important step towards a deeper understanding of nervous system development and function.

Results: Here, we report that cell-to-cell mTORC1-signaling is essential for neurovascular unit formation during mouse retinal development. Using a conditional knockout approach we demonstrate that reduced mTORC1 activity in asymmetrically positioned retinal ganglion cells induces a delay in postnatal vascular network formation in addition to the production of rudimentary and tortuous vessel networks in adult animals. The severity of this vascular phenotype is directly correlated to the degree of mTORC1 down regulation within the neighboring retinal ganglion cell population.

Conclusions: This study establishes a cell nonautonomous role for mTORC1-signaling during retinal development. These findings contribute to our current understanding of neurovascular unit formation and demonstrate how ganglion cells actively sculpt their local environment to ensure that the retina is perfused with an appropriate supply of oxygen and nutrients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
endothelial cells, mTORC1, Raptor, retinal ganglion cells, vascular retinopathy
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-185773 (URN)10.1002/dvdy.389 (DOI)000665814300001 ()34148274 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85108777838 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-05 Created: 2021-07-05 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
Jones, I., Hägglund, A.-C. & Carlsson, L. (2019). Reduced mTORC1-signalling in retinal progenitor cells leads to visual pathway dysfunction. Biology Open, 8(8), Article ID bio044370.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced mTORC1-signalling in retinal progenitor cells leads to visual pathway dysfunction
2019 (English)In: Biology Open, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 8, no 8, article id bio044370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Development of the vertebrate central nervous system involves the co-ordinated differentiation of progenitor cells and the establishment of functional neural networks. This neurogenic process is driven by both intracellular and extracellular cues that converge on the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Here we demonstrate that mTORC1-signalling mediates multi-faceted roles during central nervous system development using the mouse retina as a model system. Downregulation of mTORC1-signalling in retinal progenitor cells by conditional ablation of Rptor leads to proliferation deficits and an over-production of retinal ganglion cells during embryonic development. In contrast, reduced mTORC1-signalling in postnatal animals leads to temporal deviations in programmed cell death and the consequent production of asymmetric retinal ganglion cell mosaics and associated loss of axonal termination topographies in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of adult mice. In combination these developmental defects induce visually mediated behavioural deficits. These collective observations demonstrate that mTORC1-signalling mediates critical roles during visual pathway development and function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Company of Biologists, 2019
Keywords
Raptor, mTORC1, Retina, RGCs, dLGN, Visual cliff test
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164651 (URN)10.1242/bio.044370 (DOI)000484809100019 ()31285269 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072065895 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
Hagglund, A.-C., Jones, I. & Carlsson, L. (2017). A novel mouse model of anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD): conditional deletion of Tsc1 disrupts ciliary body and iris development. Disease Models and Mechanisms, 10(3), 245-257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel mouse model of anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD): conditional deletion of Tsc1 disrupts ciliary body and iris development
2017 (English)In: Disease Models and Mechanisms, ISSN 1754-8403, E-ISSN 1754-8411, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 245-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Development of the cornea, lens, ciliary body and iris within the anterior segment of the eye involves coordinated interaction between cells originating from the ciliary margin of the optic cup, the overlying periocular mesenchyme and the lens epithelium. Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) encompasses a spectrum of developmental syndromes that affect these anterior segment tissues. ASD conditions arise as a result of dominantly inherited genetic mutations and result in both ocular-specific and systemic forms of dysgenesis that are best exemplified by aniridia and Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, respectively. Extensive clinical overlap in disease presentation amongst ASD syndromes creates challenges for correct diagnosis and classification. The use of animal models has therefore proved to be a robust approach for unravelling this complex genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. However, despite these successes, it is clear that additional genes that underlie several ASD syndromes remain unidentified. Here, we report the characterisation of a novel mouse model of ASD. Conditional deletion of Tsc1 during eye development leads to a premature upregulation of mTORC1 activity within the ciliary margin, periocular mesenchyme and lens epithelium. This aberrant mTORC1 signalling within the ciliary margin in particular leads to a reduction in the number of cells that express Pax6, Bmp4 and Msx1. Sustained mTORC1 signalling also induces a decrease in ciliary margin progenitor cell proliferation and a consequent failure of ciliary body and iris development in postnatal animals. Our study therefore identifies Tsc1 as a novel candidate ASD gene. Furthermore, the Tsc1-ablated mouse model also provides a valuable resource for future studies concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying ASD and acts as a platform for evaluating therapeutic approaches for the treatment of visual disorders.

Keywords
Tsc1, mTORC1, Pax6, Ciliary body, Iris, Anterior segment dysgenesis
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133816 (URN)10.1242/dmm.028605 (DOI)000395717100005 ()28250050 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018362666 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
Jones, I., Hägglund, A.-C., Törnqvist, G., Nord, C., Ahlgren, U. & Carlsson, L. (2015). A novel mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC): eye-specific Tsc1-ablation disrupts visual-pathway development. Disease Models and Mechanisms, 8(12), 1517-1529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC): eye-specific Tsc1-ablation disrupts visual-pathway development
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2015 (English)In: Disease Models and Mechanisms, ISSN 1754-8403, E-ISSN 1754-8411, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 1517-1529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome that is best characterised by neurodevelopmental deficits and the presence of benign tumours (called hamartomas) in affected organs. This multi-organ disorder results from inactivating point mutations in either the TSC1 or the TSC2 genes and consequent activation of the canonical mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling (mTORC1) pathway. Because lesions to the eye are central to TSC diagnosis, we report here the generation and characterisation of the first eye-specific TSC mouse model. We demonstrate that conditional ablation of Tsc1 in eye-committed progenitor cells leads to the accelerated differentiation and subsequent ectopic radial migration of retinal ganglion cells. This results in an increase in retinal ganglion cell apoptosis and consequent regionalised axonal loss within the optic nerve and topographical changes to the contra- and ipsilateral input within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. Eyes from adult mice exhibit aberrant retinal architecture and display all the classic neuropathological hallmarks of TSC, including an increase in organ and cell size, ring heterotopias, hamartomas with retinal detachment, and lamination defects. Our results provide the first major insight into the molecular etiology of TSC within the developing eye and demonstrate a pivotal role for Tsc1 in regulating various aspects of visual-pathway development. Our novel mouse model therefore provides a valuable resource for future studies concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying TSC and also as a platform to evaluate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this multi-organ disorder.

National Category
Other Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120197 (URN)10.1242/dmm.021972 (DOI)000368905300004 ()26449264 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84952767120 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-05-11 Last updated: 2024-04-18Bibliographically approved
Hägglund, A.-C., Berghard, A. & Carlsson, L. (2013). Canonical Wnt/beta-Catenin Signalling Is Essential for Optic Cup Formation. PLOS ONE, 8(12), e81158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Canonical Wnt/beta-Catenin Signalling Is Essential for Optic Cup Formation
2013 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e81158-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A multitude of signalling pathways are involved in the process of forming an eye. Here we demonstrate that beta-catenin is essential for eye development as inactivation of beta-catenin prior to cellular specification in the optic vesicle caused anophthalmia in mice. By achieving this early and tissue-specific beta-catenin inactivation we find that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) commitment was blocked and eye development was arrested prior to optic cup formation due to a loss of canonical Wnt signalling in the dorsal optic vesicle. Thus, these results show that Wnt/beta-catenin signalling is required earlier and play a more central role in eye development than previous studies have indicated. In our genetic model system a few RPE cells could escape beta-catenin inactivation leading to the formation of a small optic rudiment. The optic rudiment contained several neural retinal cell classes surrounded by an RPE. Unlike the RPE cells, the neural retinal cells could be beta-catenin- negative revealing that differentiation of the neural retinal cell classes is beta-catenin-independent. Moreover, although dorsoventral patterning is initiated in the mutant optic vesicle, the neural retinal cells in the optic rudiment displayed almost exclusively ventral identity. Thus, beta-catenin is required for optic cup formation, commitment to RPE cells and maintenance of dorsal identity of the retina.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2013
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85289 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0081158 (DOI)000327949300074 ()2-s2.0-84891886988 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-01-31 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Berghard, A., Hägglund, A.-C., Bohm, S. & Carlsson, L. (2012). Lhx2-dependent specification of olfactory sensory neurons is required for successful integration of olfactory, vomeronasal, and GnRH neurons. The FASEB Journal, 26(8), 3464-3472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lhx2-dependent specification of olfactory sensory neurons is required for successful integration of olfactory, vomeronasal, and GnRH neurons
2012 (English)In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 3464-3472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inactivation of the LIM-homeodomain 2 gene (Lhx2) results in a severe defect in specification of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the ramifications of lack of Lhx2-dependent OSN specification for formation of the primary olfactory pathway have not been addressed, since mutant mice die in utero. We have analyzed prenatal and postnatal consequences of conditionally inactivating Lhx2 selectively in OSNs. A cell-autonomous effect is that OSN axons cannot innervate their target, the olfactory bulb. Moreover, the lack of Lhx2 in OSNs causes unpredicted, non-cell-autonomous phenotypes. First, the olfactory bulb shows pronounced hypoplasia in adults, and the data suggest that innervation by correctly specified OSNs is necessary for adult bulb size and organization. Second, absence of an olfactory nerve in the conditional mutant reveals that the vomeronasal nerve is dependent on olfactory nerve formation. Third, the lack of a proper vomeronasal nerve prevents migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells the whole distance to their final positions in the hypothalamus during embryo development. As adults, the conditional mutants do not pass puberty, and these findings support the view of an exclusive nasal origin of GnRH neurons in the mouse. Thus, Lhx2 in OSNs is required for functional development of three separate systems.—Berghard, A., Hägglund, A.-C., Bohm, S., and Carlsson, L. Lhx2-dependent specification of olfactory sensory neurons is required for successful integration of olfactory, vomeronasal, and GnRH neurons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology (FASEB), 2012
Keywords
mouse embryo development, gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, puberty phenotype
National Category
Neurosciences Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55206 (URN)10.1096/fj.12-206193 (DOI)2-s2.0-84864758823 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2012-05-13 Created: 2012-05-13 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Hägglund, A.-C., Dahl, L. & Carlsson, L. (2011). Lhx2 is required for patterning and expansion of a distinct progenitor cell population committed to eye development. PLOS ONE, 6(8), e23387
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lhx2 is required for patterning and expansion of a distinct progenitor cell population committed to eye development
2011 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 8, p. e23387-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Progenitor cells committed to eye development become specified in the prospective forebrain and develop subsequently into the optic vesicle and the optic cup. The optic vesicle induces formation of the lens placode in surface ectoderm from which the lens develops. Numerous transcription factors are involved in this process, including the eye-field transcription factors. However, many of these transcription factors also regulate the patterning of the anterior neural plate and their specific role in eye development is difficult to discern since eye-committed progenitor cells are poorly defined. By using a specific part of the Lhx2 promoter to regulate Cre recombinase expression in transgenic mice we have been able to define a distinct progenitor cell population in the forebrain solely committed to eye development. Conditional inactivation of Lhx2 in these progenitor cells causes an arrest in eye development at the stage when the optic vesicle induces lens placode formation in the surface ectoderm. The eye-committed progenitor cell population is present in the Lhx2(-/-) embryonic forebrain suggesting that commitment to eye development is Lhx2-independent. However, re-expression of Lhx2 in Lhx2(-/-) progenitor cells only promotes development of retinal pigment epithelium cells, indicating that Lhx2 promotes the acquisition of the oligopotent fate of these progenitor cells. This approach also allowed us to identify genes that distinguish Lhx2 function in eye development from that in the forebrain. Thus, we have defined a distinct progenitor cell population in the forebrain committed to eye development and identified genes linked to Lhx2’s function in the expansion and patterning of these progenitor cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco, CA: Public Library of Science, 2011
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46681 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0023387 (DOI)21886788 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84855581495 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-13 Created: 2011-09-09 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Törnqvist, G., Sandberg, A., Hägglund, A.-C. & Carlsson, L. (2010). Cyclic expression of lhx2 regulates hair formation.. PLoS genetics, 6(4), e1000904
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cyclic expression of lhx2 regulates hair formation.
2010 (English)In: PLoS genetics, ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 6, no 4, p. e1000904-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hair is important for thermoregulation, physical protection, sensory activity, seasonal camouflage, and social interactions. Hair is generated in hair follicles (HFs) and, following morphogenesis, HFs undergo cyclic phases of active growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and inactivity (telogen) throughout life. The transcriptional regulation of this process is not well understood. We show that the transcription factor Lhx2 is expressed in cells of the outer root sheath and a subpopulation of matrix cells during both morphogenesis and anagen. As the HFs enter telogen, expression becomes undetectable and reappears prior to initiation of anagen in the secondary hair germ. In contrast to previously published results, we find that Lhx2 is primarily expressed by precursor cells outside of the bulge region where the HF stem cells are located. This developmental, stage- and cell-specific expression suggests that Lhx2 regulates the generation and regeneration of hair. In support of this hypothesis, we show that Lhx2 is required for anagen progression and HF morphogenesis. Moreover, transgenic expression of Lhx2 in postnatal HFs is sufficient to induce anagen. Thus, our results reveal an alternative interpretation of Lhx2 function in HFs compared to previously published results, since Lhx2 is periodically expressed, primarily in precursor cells distinct from those in the bulge region, and is an essential positive regulator of hair formation.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-33655 (URN)10.1371/journal.pgen.1000904 (DOI)000277354200021 ()20386748 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77952347826 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-04-30 Created: 2010-04-30 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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