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Riklund, Katrine, MD, PhD, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5227-8117
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Publications (10 of 184) Show all publications
Karalija, N., Papenberg, G., Johansson, J., Wåhlin, A., Salami, A., Andersson, M., . . . Nyberg, L. (2024). Longitudinal support for the correlative triad among aging, dopamine D2-like receptor loss, and memory decline. Neurobiology of Aging, 136, 125-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal support for the correlative triad among aging, dopamine D2-like receptor loss, and memory decline
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2024 (English)In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 136, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dopamine decline is suggested to underlie aging-related cognitive decline, but longitudinal examinations of this link are currently missing. We analyzed 5-year longitudinal data for a sample of healthy, older adults (baseline: n = 181, age: 64–68 years; 5-year follow-up: n = 129) who underwent positron emission tomography with 11C-raclopride to assess dopamine D2-like receptor (DRD2) availability, magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate structural brain measures, and cognitive tests. Health, lifestyle, and genetic data were also collected. A data-driven approach (k-means cluster analysis) identified groups that differed maximally in DRD2 decline rates in age-sensitive brain regions. One group (n = 47) had DRD2 decline exclusively in the caudate and no cognitive decline. A second group (n = 72) had more wide-ranged DRD2 decline in putamen and nucleus accumbens and also in extrastriatal regions. The latter group showed significant 5-year working memory decline that correlated with putamen DRD2 decline, along with higher dementia and cardiovascular risk and a faster biological pace of aging. Taken together, for individuals with more extensive DRD2 decline, dopamine decline is associated with memory decline in aging.

Keywords
11C-raclopride, Aging, Dopamine D2-like receptor, Longitudinal, Magnetic resonance imaging, Positron emission tomography, Working memory
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221540 (URN)10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2024.02.001 (DOI)38359585 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185304249 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-648Swedish Research Council, 2017-02217Swedish Research Council, 2022-01804Umeå UniversityKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0277Jonas and Christina af Jochnick FoundationAlzheimerfonden, AF-967710Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P20-0779Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2024-03-15 Created: 2024-03-15 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Renman, D., van Guelpen, B., Anderson, F., Axelsson, J., Riklund, K., Strigård, K., . . . Gylling, B. (2023). Association of pre-diagnostic physical exercise and peri-diagnostic body composition with mortality in non-metastatic colorectal cancer. International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 38(1), Article ID 239.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of pre-diagnostic physical exercise and peri-diagnostic body composition with mortality in non-metastatic colorectal cancer
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 38, no 1, article id 239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Sarcopenia and myosteatosis, quantified via computed tomography (CT), are associated with poor colorectal cancer outcomes. These body composition estimates can be influenced by physical exercise. We explored the correlation between pre-diagnostic physical exercise, body composition close to diagnosis, and the combined prognosis impact of these factors.

Methods: We studied 519 stage I–III colorectal cancer (CRC) cases diagnosed 2000–2016 with pre-diagnostic self-reported recreational physical exercise data collected in the prospective, population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, and CT-estimated skeletal muscle index (SMI) or skeletal muscle density (SMD). Risk estimates were calculated by multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: No association was seen between low pre-diagnostic physical exercise and sarcopenia/myosteatosis in the multivariable model adjusted for age, sex, educational level, tumor stage, and tumor location. In multivariable Cox regression models, the combination of low pre-diagnostic physical exercise and either sarcopenia or myosteatosis at the time of diagnosis was associated with cancer-specific mortality compared to the reference group of high physical exercise combined with no sarcopenia/myosteatosis (adjusted HR 1.94 95% CI 1.00–3.76 for sarcopenia and adjusted HR 2.39 95% CI 1.16–4.94 for myosteatosis).

Conclusions: The combined presence of low pre-diagnostic physical exercise and sarcopenia or myosteatosis was associated with increased CRC-specific mortality. Despite the positive effect on prognosis, physical exercise did not alter body composition estimates at diagnosis, which could indicate attenuation from other factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Colorectal cancer, Exercise, Myosteatosis, Physical activity, Sarcopenia
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215081 (URN)10.1007/s00384-023-04536-0 (DOI)37755537 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85172659066 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Cancerforskningsfonden i Norrland, AMP 20-999Visare Norr, 967732Region Västerbotten, ALF RV-968855Region Västerbotten, ALF RV-982739
Available from: 2023-10-13 Created: 2023-10-13 Last updated: 2024-02-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, J., Nordin, K., Pedersen, R., Karalija, N., Papenberg, G., Andersson, M., . . . Salami, A. (2023). Biphasic patterns of age-related differences in dopamine D1 receptors across the adult lifespan. Cell Reports, 42(9), Article ID 113107.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biphasic patterns of age-related differences in dopamine D1 receptors across the adult lifespan
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2023 (English)In: Cell Reports, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 42, no 9, article id 113107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Age-related alterations in D1-like dopamine receptor (D1DR) have distinct implications for human cognition and behavior during development and aging, but the timing of these periods remains undefined. Enabled by a large sample of in vivo assessments (n = 180, age 20 to 80 years of age, 50% female), we discover that age-related D1DR differences pivot at approximately 40 years of age in several brain regions. Focusing on the most age-sensitive dopamine-rich region, we observe opposing pre- and post-forties interrelations among caudate D1DR, cortico-striatal functional connectivity, and memory. Finally, particularly caudate D1DR differences in midlife and beyond, but not in early adulthood, associate with manifestation of white matter lesions. The present results support a model by which excessive dopamine modulation in early adulthood and insufficient modulation in aging are deleterious to brain function and cognition, thus challenging a prevailing view of monotonic D1DR function across the adult lifespan.

Keywords
aging, cognition, CP: Neuroscience, dopamine D1, functional connectivity, neuromodulation, protracted development
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214414 (URN)10.1016/j.celrep.2023.113107 (DOI)2-s2.0-85169884676 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-01936Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2023-09-18 Created: 2023-09-18 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Santos, J., Foley, S., Andersson, J., Figueiredo, J. P., Hoeschen, C., Damilakis, J., . . . Paulo, G. (2023). Education and training in radiation protection in Europe: results from the EURAMED Rocc-n-Roll project survey. Insights into Imaging, 14(1), Article ID 55.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education and training in radiation protection in Europe: results from the EURAMED Rocc-n-Roll project survey
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2023 (English)In: Insights into Imaging, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To analyse the existing radiation protection (RP) education and training (E&T) capabilities in the European Union and identify associated needs, problems and challenges.

Method: An online survey was disseminated via the EURAMED Rocc-n-Roll consortium network and prominent medical societies in the field of radiological research. The survey sections analyse the RP E&T during undergraduate, residency/internship and continuous professional development; RP E&T problems and legal implementation. Differences were analysed by European geographic regions, profession, years of professional experience and main area of practice/research.

Results: The majority of the 550 respondents indicated that RP topics are part of undergraduate curricula in all courses for their profession and country (55%); however, hands-on practical training is not included according to 30% of the respondents. The lack of E&T, practical aspects in current E&T, and mandatory continuing E&T were considered the major problems. The legal requirement that obtained higher implementation score was the inclusion of the practical aspects of medical radiological procedures on education (86%), and lower score was obtained for the inclusion of RP E&T on medical and dental school curriculums (61%).

Conclusions: A heterogeneity in RP E&T during undergraduate, residency/internship and continuous professional development is evident across Europe. Differences were noted per area of practice/research, profession, and European geographic region. A large variation in RP E&T problem rating was also obtained.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Education and training, European Basic Safety Standards, Medical exposure, Radiation protection
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206948 (URN)10.1186/s13244-023-01398-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85152565595 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-27 Created: 2023-04-27 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Sandgren, K., Strandberg, S., Jonsson, J., Grefve, J., Keeratijarut Lindberg, A., Nilsson, E., . . . Riklund, K. (2023). Histopathology-validated lesion detection rates of clinically significant prostate cancer with mpMRI, [68Ga]PSMA-11-PET and [11C]Acetate-PET. Nuclear medicine communications, 44(11), 997-1004
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Histopathology-validated lesion detection rates of clinically significant prostate cancer with mpMRI, [68Ga]PSMA-11-PET and [11C]Acetate-PET
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2023 (English)In: Nuclear medicine communications, ISSN 0143-3636, E-ISSN 1473-5628, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 997-1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: PET/CT and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) are important diagnostic tools in clinically significant prostate cancer (csPC). The aim of this study was to compare csPC detection rates with [68Ga]PSMA-11-PET (PSMA)-PET, [11C] Acetate (ACE)-PET, and mpMRI with histopathology as reference, to identify the most suitable imaging modalities for subsequent hybrid imaging. An additional aim was to compare inter-reader variability to assess reproducibility.

Methods: During 2016–2019, all study participants were examined with PSMA-PET/mpMRI and ACE-PET/CT prior to radical prostatectomy. PSMA-PET, ACE-PET and mpMRI were evaluated separately by two observers, and were compared with histopathology-defined csPC. Statistical analyses included two-sided McNemar test and index of specific agreement.

Results: Fifty-five study participants were included, with 130 histopathological intraprostatic lesions >0.05 cc. Of these, 32% (42/130) were classified as csPC with ISUP grade ≥2 and volume >0.5 cc. PSMA-PET and mpMRI showed no difference in performance (P = 0.48), with mean csPC detection rate of 70% (29.5/42) and 74% (31/42), respectively, while with ACE-PET the mean csPC detection rate was 37% (15.5/42). Interobserver agreement was higher with PSMA-PET compared to mpMRI [79% (26/33) vs 67% (24/38)]. Including all detected lesions from each pair of observers, the detection rate increased to 90% (38/42) with mpMRI, and 79% (33/42) with PSMA-PET.

Conclusion: PSMA-PET and mpMRI showed high csPC detection rates and superior performance compared to ACE-PET. The interobserver agreement indicates higher reproducibility with PSMA-PET. The combined result of all observers in both PSMA-PET and mpMRI showed the highest detection rate, suggesting an added value of a hybrid imaging approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2023
Keywords
acetate-PET, detection rate, intraprostatic lesion, multiparametric MRI, prostate cancer, PSMA-PET
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216125 (URN)10.1097/MNM.0000000000001743 (DOI)001083841200009 ()37615497 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174936230 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietyVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Sandgren, K., Grefve, J., Jonsson, J., Axelsson, J., Keeratijarut Lindberg, A., . . . Nyholm, T. (2023). The grade of individual prostate cancer lesions predicted by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Communications Medicine, 3(1), Article ID 164.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The grade of individual prostate cancer lesions predicted by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography
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2023 (English)In: Communications Medicine, E-ISSN 2730-664X, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) are widely used for the management of prostate cancer (PCa). However, how these modalities complement each other in PCa risk stratification is still largely unknown. We aim to provide insights into the potential of mpMRI and PET for PCa risk stratification.

Methods: We analyzed data from 55 consecutive patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen and biopsy-proven PCa enrolled in a prospective study between December 2016 and December 2019. [68Ga]PSMA-11 PET (PSMA-PET), [11C]Acetate PET (Acetate-PET) and mpMRI were co-registered with whole-mount histopathology. Lower- and higher-grade lesions were defined by International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grade groups (IGG). We used PET and mpMRI data to differentiate between grades in two cases: IGG 3 vs. IGG 2 (case 1) and IGG ≥ 3 vs. IGG ≤ 2 (case 2). The performance was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

Results: We find that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) for PSMA-PET achieves the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC), with AUCs of 0.72 (case 1) and 0.79 (case 2). Combining the volume transfer constant, apparent diffusion coefficient and T2-weighted images (each normalized to non-malignant prostatic tissue) results in AUCs of 0.70 (case 1) and 0.70 (case 2). Adding PSMA-SUVmax increases the AUCs by 0.09 (p < 0.01) and 0.12 (p < 0.01), respectively.

Conclusions: By co-registering whole-mount histopathology and in-vivo imaging we show that mpMRI and PET can distinguish between lower- and higher-grade prostate cancer, using partially discriminative cut-off values.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-224145 (URN)10.1038/s43856-023-00394-7 (DOI)001103117100002 ()37945817 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 21 1594 Pj
Available from: 2024-05-08 Created: 2024-05-08 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved
Farnsworth von Cederwald, B., Johansson, J., Riklund, K., Karalija, N. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2023). White matter lesion load determines exercise-induced dopaminergic plasticity and working memory gains in aging. Translational Psychiatry, 13(1), Article ID 28.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>White matter lesion load determines exercise-induced dopaminergic plasticity and working memory gains in aging
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2023 (English)In: Translational Psychiatry, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Age-related dopamine reductions have been suggested to contribute to maladaptive working memory (WM) function in older ages. One promising intervention approach is to increase physical activity, as this has been associated with plasticity of the striatal dopamine system and WM improvements, however with individual differences in efficacy. The present work focused on the impact of individual differences in white-matter lesion burden upon dopamine D2-like receptor (DRD2) availability and WM changes in response to a 6 months physical activity intervention. While the intervention altered striatal DRD2 availability and WM performance in individuals with no or only mild lesions (p < 0.05), no such effects were found in individuals with moderate-to-severe lesion severity (p > 0.05). Follow-up analyses revealed a similar pattern for processing speed, but not for episodic memory performance. Linear analyses further revealed that lesion volume (ml) at baseline was associated with reduced DRD2 availability (r = −0.41, p < 0.05), and level of DRD2 change (r = 0.40, p < 0.05). Taken together, this study underlines the necessity to consider cerebrovascular health in interventions with neurocognitive targets. Future work should assess whether these findings extend beyond measures of DRD2 availability and WM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Neurosciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204468 (URN)10.1038/s41398-022-02270-9 (DOI)000924365700002 ()36720847 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147098951 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-00530Region VästerbottenUmeå UniversityThe Kamprad Family FoundationThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2023-02-17 Created: 2023-02-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Vikner, T., Karalija, N., Eklund, A., Malm, J., Lundquist, A., Gallewicz, N., . . . Wåhlin, A. (2022). 5-year associations among cerebral arterial pulsatility, perivascular space dilation, and white matter lesions. Annals of Neurology, 92(5), 871-881
Open this publication in new window or tab >>5-year associations among cerebral arterial pulsatility, perivascular space dilation, and white matter lesions
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2022 (English)In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 871-881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: High cerebral arterial pulsatility index (PI), white matter lesions (WMLs), enlarged perivascular spaces (PVSs), and lacunar infarcts are common findings in the elderly population, and considered indicators of small vessel disease (SVD). Here, we investigate the potential temporal ordering among these variables, with emphasis on determining whether high PI is an early or delayed manifestation of SVD.

Methods: In a population-based cohort, 4D flow MRI data for cerebral arterial pulsatility was collected for 159 participants at baseline (age 64–68), and for 122 participants at follow-up 5 years later. Structural MRI was used for WML and PVS segmentation, and lacune identification. Linear mixed-effects (LME) models were used to model longitudinal changes testing for pairwise associations, and latent change score (LCS) models to model multiple relationships among variables simultaneously.

Results: Longitudinal 5-year increases were found for WML, PVS, and PI. Cerebral arterial PI at baseline did not predict changes in WML or PVS volume. However, WML and PVS volume at baseline predicted 5-year increases in PI. This was shown for PI increases in relation to baseline WML and PVS volumes using LME models (R (Formula presented.) 0.24; p < 0.02 and R (Formula presented.) 0.23; p < 0.03, respectively) and LCS models ((Formula presented.) = 0.28; p = 0.015 and (Formula presented.) = 0.28; p = 0.009, respectively). Lacunes at baseline were unrelated to PI.

Interpretation: In healthy older adults, indicators of SVD are related in a lead–lag fashion, in which the expression of WML and PVS precedes increases in cerebral arterial PI. Hence, we propose that elevated PI is a relatively late manifestation, rather than a risk factor, for cerebral SVD. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199208 (URN)10.1002/ana.26475 (DOI)000843724700001 ()36054261 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136905097 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchRegion Västerbotten, 2017‐04949Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2017‐04949Max Planck SocietySwedish Research Council, 2017‐02217Swedish Research Council, 421‐2012‐648
Available from: 2022-09-08 Created: 2022-09-08 Last updated: 2023-05-04Bibliographically approved
Unéus, E. I., Wilhelmsson, C., Bäckström, D., Anan, I., Wixner, J., Pilebro, B., . . . Sundström, T. (2022). Cerebellar and Cerebral Amyloid Visualized by [18F]flutemetamol PET in Long-Term Hereditary V30M (p.V50M) Transthyretin Amyloidosis Survivors. Frontiers in Neurology, 13, Article ID 816636.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebellar and Cerebral Amyloid Visualized by [18F]flutemetamol PET in Long-Term Hereditary V30M (p.V50M) Transthyretin Amyloidosis Survivors
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Neurology, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 13, article id 816636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Hereditary transthyretin (ATTRv) amyloidosis caused by the V30M (p. V50M) mutation is a fatal, neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. Liver transplantation has prolonged the survival of patients and central nervous system (CNS) complications, attributed to amyloid angiopathy caused by CNS synthesis of variant transthyretin, have emerged. The study aimed to ascertain amyloid deposition within the brain in long-term ATTRv amyloidosis survivors with neurological symptoms from the CNS.

Methods: A total of 20 patients with ATTR V30M having symptoms from the CNS and a median disease duration of 16 years (8–25 years) were included in this study. The cognitive and peripheral nervous functions were determined for 18 patients cross-sectionally at the time of the investigation. Amyloid brain deposits were examined by [18F]flutemetamol PET/CT. Five patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) served as positive controls.

Result: 60% of the patients with ATTRv had a pathological Z-score in the cerebellum, compared to only 20% in the patients with AD. 75% of the patients with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNEs) displayed a pathological uptake only in the cerebellum. Increased cerebellar uptake was related to an early age of onset of the ATTRv disease. 55% of the patients with ATTRv had a pathological Z-score in the global cerebral region compared to 100% of the patients with AD.

Conclusion: Amyloid deposition within the brain after long-standing ATTRv amyloidosis is common, especially in the cerebellum. A cerebellar amyloid uptake profile seems to be related to TFNE symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
amyloid angiopathy, amyloidosis-hereditary, positron emission tomography, transthyretin, [18F]flutemetamol
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193803 (URN)10.3389/fneur.2022.816636 (DOI)000773941500001 ()35317351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127418033 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20160787Region VästerbottenThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2022-05-06 Created: 2022-05-06 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Marti-Bonmati, L., Koh, D.-M., Riklund, K., Bobowicz, M., Roussakis, Y., Vilanova, J. C., . . . Tsakou, G. (2022). Considerations for artificial intelligence clinical impact in oncologic imaging: an AI4HI position paper. Insights into Imaging, 13(1), Article ID 89.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Considerations for artificial intelligence clinical impact in oncologic imaging: an AI4HI position paper
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2022 (English)In: Insights into Imaging, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To achieve clinical impact in daily oncological practice, emerging AI-based cancer imaging research needs to have clearly defined medical focus, AI methods, and outcomes to be estimated. AI-supported cancer imaging should predict major relevant clinical endpoints, aiming to extract associations and draw inferences in a fair, robust, and trustworthy way. AI-assisted solutions as medical devices, developed using multicenter heterogeneous datasets, should be targeted to have an impact on the clinical care pathway. When designing an AI-based research study in oncologic imaging, ensuring clinical impact in AI solutions requires careful consideration of key aspects, including target population selection, sample size definition, standards, and common data elements utilization, balanced dataset splitting, appropriate validation methodology, adequate ground truth, and careful selection of clinical endpoints. Endpoints may be pathology hallmarks, disease behavior, treatment response, or patient prognosis. Ensuring ethical, safety, and privacy considerations are also mandatory before clinical validation is performed. The Artificial Intelligence for Health Imaging (AI4HI) Clinical Working Group has discussed and present in this paper some indicative Machine Learning (ML) enabled decision-support solutions currently under research in the AI4HI projects, as well as the main considerations and requirements that AI solutions should have from a clinical perspective, which can be adopted into clinical practice. If effectively designed, implemented, and validated, cancer imaging AI-supported tools will have the potential to revolutionize the field of precision medicine in oncology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Artificial intelligence, Clinical validation, Oncologic imaging, Prediction models
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195059 (URN)10.1186/s13244-022-01220-9 (DOI)000793164700003 ()35536446 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129855096 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 826494EU, Horizon 2020, 952103EU, Horizon 2020, 952159EU, Horizon 2020, 952172EU, Horizon 2020, 952179
Available from: 2022-05-23 Created: 2022-05-23 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5227-8117

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