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Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Ménard, D., Serk, H., Decou, R. & Pesquet, E. (2024). Inducible pluripotent suspension cell cultures (iPSCs) to study plant cell differentiation (2ed.). In: Javier Agusti (Ed.), Xylem: methods and protocols (pp. 171-200). New York: Humana Press, 2722
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inducible pluripotent suspension cell cultures (iPSCs) to study plant cell differentiation
2024 (English)In: Xylem: methods and protocols / [ed] Javier Agusti, New York: Humana Press, 2024, 2, Vol. 2722, p. 171-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Inducing the differentiation of specific cell type(s) synchronously and on-demand is a great experimental system to understand the sequential progression of the cellular processes, their timing and their resulting properties for distinct isolated plant cells independently of their tissue context. The inducible differentiation in cell suspension cultures, moreover, enables to obtain large quantities of distinct cell types at specific development stage, which is not possible when using whole plants. The differentiation of tracheary elements (TEs) - the cell type responsible for the hydro-mineral sap conduction and skeletal support of plants in xylem tissues - has been the most studied using inducible cell suspension cultures. We herein describe how to establish and use inducible pluripotent suspension cell cultures (iPSCs) in Arabidopsis thaliana to trigger on-demand different cell types, such as TEs or mesophyll cells. We, moreover, describe the methods to establish, monitor, and modify the sequence, duration, and properties of differentiated cells using iPSCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Humana Press, 2024 Edition: 2
Series
Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029 ; 2722
Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, Drug-treatment, Habituated cell cultures, Hormone-inducible differentiation, Inducible pluripotent cell suspension cultures (iPSCs), Stable genetic transformation, Tracheary elements
National Category
Cell Biology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216185 (URN)10.1007/978-1-0716-3477-6_13 (DOI)37897608 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175278626 (Scopus ID)9781071634769 (ISBN)9781071634790 (ISBN)9781071634776 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2024-03-05Bibliographically approved
Sasaki, T., Saito, K., Inoue, D., Serk, H., Sugiyama, Y., Pesquet, E., . . . Oda, Y. (2023). Confined-microtubule assembly shapes three-dimensional cell wall structures in xylem vessels. Nature Communications, 14(1), Article ID 6987.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Confined-microtubule assembly shapes three-dimensional cell wall structures in xylem vessels
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2023 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 6987Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Properly patterned deposition of cell wall polymers is prerequisite for the morphogenesis of plant cells. A cortical microtubule array guides the two-dimensional pattern of cell wall deposition. Yet, the mechanism underlying the three-dimensional patterning of cell wall deposition is poorly understood. In metaxylem vessels, cell wall arches are formed over numerous pit membranes, forming highly organized three-dimensional cell wall structures. Here, we show that the microtubule-associated proteins, MAP70-5 and MAP70-1, regulate arch development. The map70-1 map70-5 plants formed oblique arches in an abnormal orientation in pits. Microtubules fit the aperture of developing arches in wild-type cells, whereas microtubules in map70-1 map70-5 cells extended over the boundaries of pit arches. MAP70 caused the bending and bundling of microtubules. These results suggest that MAP70 confines microtubules within the pit apertures by altering the physical properties of microtubules, thereby directing the growth of pit arches in the proper orientation. This study provides clues to understanding how plants develop three-dimensional structure of cell walls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216904 (URN)10.1038/s41467-023-42487-w (DOI)37957173 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176414959 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsSwedish Research Council, 2010-4620Swedish Research Council, 2016-04727
Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2023-12-04Bibliographically approved
Blaschek, L., Murozuka, E., Serk, H., Menard, D. & Pesquet, E. (2023). Different combinations of laccase paralogs nonredundantly control the amount and composition of lignin in specific cell types and cell wall layers in Arabidopsis. The Plant Cell, 35(2), 889-909
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different combinations of laccase paralogs nonredundantly control the amount and composition of lignin in specific cell types and cell wall layers in Arabidopsis
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2023 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 889-909Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vascular plants reinforce the cell walls of the different xylem cell types with lignin phenolic polymers. Distinct lignin chemistries differ between each cell wall layer and each cell type to support their specific functions. Yet the mechanisms controlling the tight spatial localization of specific lignin chemistries remain unclear. Current hypotheses focus on control by monomer biosynthesis and/or export, while cell wall polymerization is viewed as random and nonlimiting. Here, we show that combinations of multiple individual laccases (LACs) are nonredundantly and specifically required to set the lignin chemistry in different cell types and their distinct cell wall layers. We dissected the roles of Arabidopsis thaliana LAC4, 5, 10, 12, and 17 by generating quadruple and quintuple loss-of-function mutants. Loss of these LACs in different combinations led to specific changes in lignin chemistry affecting both residue ring structures and/or aliphatic tails in specific cell types and cell wall layers. Moreover, we showed that LAC-mediated lignification has distinct functions in specific cell types, waterproofing fibers, and strengthening vessels. Altogether, we propose that the spatial control of lignin chemistry depends on different combinations of LACs with nonredundant activities immobilized in specific cell types and cell wall layers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213595 (URN)10.1093/plcell/koac344 (DOI)000929007700001 ()36449969 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144967532 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsThe Royal Swedish Academy of SciencesSwedish Research Council, 2010-4620
Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Ménard, D., Blaschek, L., Kriechbaum, K., Lee, C. C., Serk, H., Zhu, C., . . . Pesquet, E. (2022). Plant biomechanics and resilience to environmental changes are controlled by specific lignin chemistries in each vascular cell type and morphotype. The Plant Cell, 34(12), 4877-4896
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plant biomechanics and resilience to environmental changes are controlled by specific lignin chemistries in each vascular cell type and morphotype
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2022 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 4877-4896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The biopolymer lignin is deposited in the cell walls of vascular cells and is essential for long-distance water conduction and structural support in plants. Different vascular cell types contain distinct and conserved lignin chemistries, each with specific aromatic and aliphatic substitutions. Yet, the biological role of this conserved and specific lignin chemistry in each cell type remains unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of this lignin biochemical specificity for cellular functions by producing single cell analyses for three cell morphotypes of tracheary elements, which all allow sap conduction but differ in their morphology. We determined that specific lignin chemistries accumulate in each cell type. Moreover, lignin accumulated dynamically, increasing in quantity and changing in composition, to alter the cell wall biomechanics during cell maturation. For similar aromatic substitutions, residues with alcohol aliphatic functions increased stiffness whereas aldehydes increased flexibility of the cell wall. Modifying this lignin biochemical specificity and the sequence of its formation impaired the cell wall biomechanics of each morphotype and consequently hindered sap conduction and drought recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that each sap-conducting vascular cell type distinctly controls their lignin biochemistry to adjust their biomechanics and hydraulic properties to face developmental and environmental constraints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
National Category
Cell Biology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213619 (URN)10.1093/plcell/koac284 (DOI)000865526100001 ()36215679 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144929678 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-4620Swedish Research Council, 2016-04727Swedish Research Council, 2019-00217The Kempe FoundationsBio4EnergySwedish Foundation for Strategic ResearchThe Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, BS2018-0061Carl Tryggers foundation , 16:362Carl Tryggers foundation , 17:16Carl Tryggers foundation , 18:306Carl Tryggers foundation , 21:1201
Available from: 2023-08-25 Created: 2023-08-25 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Blaschek, L., Champagne, A., Dimotakis, C., Nuoendagula, ., Decou, R., Hishiyama, S., . . . Pesquet, E. (2020). Cellular and Genetic Regulation of Coniferaldehyde Incorporation in Lignin of Herbaceous and Woody Plants by Quantitative Wiesner Staining. Frontiers in Plant Science, 11, Article ID 109.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellular and Genetic Regulation of Coniferaldehyde Incorporation in Lignin of Herbaceous and Woody Plants by Quantitative Wiesner Staining
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2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 11, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignin accumulates in the cell walls of specialized cell types to enable plants to stand upright and conduct water and minerals, withstand abiotic stresses, and defend themselves against pathogens. These functions depend on specific lignin concentrations and subunit composition in different cell types and cell wall layers. However, the mechanisms controlling the accumulation of specific lignin subunits, such as coniferaldehyde, during the development of these different cell types are still poorly understood. We herein validated the Wiesner test (phloroglucinol/HCl) for the restrictive quantitative in situ analysis of coniferaldehyde incorporation in lignin. Using this optimized tool, we investigated the genetic control of coniferaldehyde incorporation in the different cell types of genetically-engineered herbaceous and woody plants with modified lignin content and/or composition. Our results demonstrate that the incorporation of coniferaldehyde in lignified cells is controlled by (a) autonomous biosynthetic routes for each cell type, combined with (b) distinct cell-to-cell cooperation between specific cell types, and (c) cell wall layer-specific accumulation capacity. This process tightly regulates coniferaldehyde residue accumulation in specific cell types to adapt their property and/or function to developmental and/or environmental changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020
Keywords
lignin, in situ quantification, coniferaldehyde, Wiesner test, phloroglucinol, HCl, cellular networks, image analysis
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170417 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2020.00109 (DOI)000524690800001 ()32194582 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85082688115 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-05 Created: 2020-05-05 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Dubreuil, C., Jin, X., Barajas-López, J. d., Hewitt, T. C., Tanz, S. K., Dobrenel, T., . . . Strand, Å. (2018). Establishment of Photosynthesis through Chloroplast Development Is Controlled by Two Distinct Regulatory Phases. Plant Physiology, 176(2), 1199-1214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishment of Photosynthesis through Chloroplast Development Is Controlled by Two Distinct Regulatory Phases
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2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, no 2, p. 1199-1214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chloroplasts develop from undifferentiated proplastids present in meristematic tissue. Thus, chloroplast biogenesis is closely connected to leaf development, which restricts our ability to study the process of chloroplast biogenesis per se. As a consequence, we know relatively little about the regulatory mechanisms behind the establishment of the photosynthetic reactions and how the activities of the two genomes involved are coordinated during chloroplast development. We developed a single cell-based experimental system from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with high temporal resolution allowing for investigations of the transition from proplastids to functional chloroplasts. Using this unique cell line, we could show that the establishment of photosynthesis is dependent on a regulatory mechanism involving two distinct phases. The first phase is triggered by rapid light-induced changes in gene expression and the metabolome. The second phase is dependent on the activation of the chloroplast and generates massive changes in the nuclear gene expression required for the transition to photosynthetically functional chloroplasts. The second phase also is associated with a spatial transition of the chloroplasts from clusters around the nucleus to the final position at the cell cortex. Thus, the establishment of photosynthesis is a two-phase process with a clear checkpoint associated with the second regulatory phase allowing coordination of the activities of the nuclear and plastid genomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2018
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140157 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.00435 (DOI)000424285500021 ()28626007 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041733632 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Decou, R., Serk, H., Menard, D. & Pesquet, E. (2017). Analysis of lignin composition and distribution using fluorescence laser confocal microspectroscopy (1ed.). In: Miguel de Lucas; J. Peter Etchhells (Ed.), Xylem: methods and protocols (pp. 233-247). New York: Humana Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of lignin composition and distribution using fluorescence laser confocal microspectroscopy
2017 (English)In: Xylem: methods and protocols / [ed] Miguel de Lucas; J. Peter Etchhells, New York: Humana Press, 2017, 1, , p. 15p. 233-247Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Lignin is a polyphenolic polymer specifically accumulating in the cell walls of xylem cells in higher vascular plants. Far from being homogeneous, the lignification of xylem cell walls varies in deposition site, quantity, composition and macromolecular conformation depending on the cell wall compartment, cell type, cell developmental stage and plant species. Here, we describe how confocal microspectroscopy methods using lignin autofluorescence can be used to evaluate the relative lignin amounts, its spatial distribution and composition at the cellular and sub-cellular levels in both isolated cells and histological cross-sections of plant tissues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Humana Press, 2017. p. 15 Edition: 1
Series
Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029 ; 1544
Keywords
Fibers, Fluorescence confocal microspectroscopy, Lignin, Tracheary elements, Vessels, Wood, Xylem
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208658 (URN)10.1007/978-1-4939-6722-3_17 (DOI)28050840 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85008929655 (Scopus ID)9781493967209 (ISBN)9781493967223 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-06-09 Created: 2023-06-09 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Sundell, D., Street, N. R., Kumar, M., Mellerowicz, E. J., Kucukoglu, M., Johnsson, C., . . . Hvidsten, T. R. (2017). AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula. The Plant Cell, 29(7), 1585-1604
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula
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2017 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1585-1604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, and efforts to engineer elite varieties will benefit from improved understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated high-spatial-resolution RNA sequencing data spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, and wood-forming tissues of Populus tremula. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, annotated genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes, and 567 putative long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole-genome duplication had diverged expression, with the exception of those highly expressed during secondary cell wall deposition. Coexpression network analyses revealed that regulation of the transcriptome underlying cambial growth and wood formation comprises numerous modules forming a continuum of active processes across the tissues. A comparative analysis revealed that a majority of these modules are conserved in Picea abies. The high spatial resolution of our data enabled identification of novel roles for characterized genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and lignification. An associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) provides interactive tools for exploring the expression profiles and coexpression network.

National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139016 (URN)10.1105/tpc.17.00153 (DOI)000407495000008 ()2-s2.0-85027414367 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Menard, D., Serk, H., Decou, R. & Pesquet, E. (2017). Establishment and utilization of habituated cell suspension cultures for hormone-inducible xylogenesis (1ed.). In: Miguel de Lucas; J. Peter Etchhells (Ed.), Xylem: methods and protocols (pp. 37-57). New York: Humana Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishment and utilization of habituated cell suspension cultures for hormone-inducible xylogenesis
2017 (English)In: Xylem: methods and protocols / [ed] Miguel de Lucas; J. Peter Etchhells, New York: Humana Press, 2017, 1, , p. 21p. 37-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The development of inducible cell differentiation in suspension cultures led to multiple breakthroughs. It enabled the understanding of the chronology, duration, regulation and interdependency of the multiple events leading to fully functional specialized cells. The most studied cell differentiation in plants using inducible suspension cultures is the formation of tracheary elements (TEs) - the hydro-mineral sap conducting cells. Several in vitro systems established in different plant species have been developed to trigger TE formation on-demand. Here, we describe the establishment, harvesting and analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana stable habituated cell lines inducible by hormones to differentiate into TEs on-demand. Moreover, we explain the means to monitor and modify the chronology, duration and regulation of the progression of TE formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Humana Press, 2017. p. 21 Edition: 1
Series
Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029 ; 1544
Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, Habituated cell cultures, Hormone inducible differentiation, Tracheary elements
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208656 (URN)10.1007/978-1-4939-6722-3_4 (DOI)28050827 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85008937448 (Scopus ID)9781493967209 (ISBN)9781493967223 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-06-09 Created: 2023-06-09 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Soler, M., Plasencia, A., Larbat, R., Pouzet, C., Jauneau, A., Rivas, S., . . . Grima-Pettenati, J. (2017). The Eucalyptus linker histone variant EgH1.3 cooperates with the transcription factor EgMYB1 to control lignin biosynthesis during wood formation. New Phytologist, 213(1), 287-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Eucalyptus linker histone variant EgH1.3 cooperates with the transcription factor EgMYB1 to control lignin biosynthesis during wood formation
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2017 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 213, no 1, p. 287-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wood, also called secondary xylem, is a specialized vascular tissue constituted by different cell types that undergo a differentiation process involving deposition of thick, lignified secondary cell walls. The mechanisms needed to control the extent of lignin deposition depending on the cell type and the differentiation stage are far from being fully understood. We found that the Eucalyptus transcription factor EgMYB1, which is known to repress lignin biosynthesis, interacts specifically with a linker histone variant, EgH1.3. This interaction enhances the repression of EgMYB1' s target genes, strongly limiting the amount of lignin deposited in xylem cell walls. The expression profiles of EgMYB1 and EgH1.3 overlap in xylem cells at early stages of their differentiation as well as in mature parenchymatous xylem cells, which have no or only thin lignified secondary cell walls. This suggests that a complex between EgMYB1 and EgH1.3 integrates developmental signals to prevent premature or inappropriate lignification of secondary cell walls, providing a mechanism to fine-tune the differentiation of xylem cells in time and space. We also demonstrate a role for a linker histone variant in the regulation of a specific developmental process through interaction with a transcription factor, illustrating that plant linker histones have other functions beyond chromatin organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
cambium, lignin, linker histones, MYB transcription factors, protein-protein interactions, secondary cell wall, wood formation, xylem
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129702 (URN)10.1111/nph.14129 (DOI)000389184600028 ()2-s2.0-84982908660 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Projects
Understanding the mechanisms controlling xylem vessels cell wall organization and synthesis [2010-04620_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6959-3284

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