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Publications (10 of 118) Show all publications
Stenling, A., Nielsen, K., Olafsen, A. H. & Tafvelin, S. (2024). Need-supportive leadership behaviors and sickness absence among employees: the mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction. Applied Psychology: an international review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Need-supportive leadership behaviors and sickness absence among employees: the mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction
2024 (English)In: Applied Psychology: an international review, ISSN 0269-994X, E-ISSN 1464-0597Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Research exploring relationships between leadership behaviors and sickness absence is scarce. Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT), the present study examined: (i) the relationship between need-supportive leadership and sickness absence; and (ii) whether satisfaction of the basic psychological needs mediates the relationship between need-supportive leadership and sickness absence. Municipal employees (n = 347, 78% women, age span = 19–66 years) provided baseline data on perceived need-supportive leadership and reported their need satisfaction at work 8 weeks later. Sickness absence data were obtained from municipality records. Two-part regression models showed that need-supportive leadership was negatively associated with sick days (b = −0.28, 95% CI [−0.45, −0.11]). Need-supportive leadership had an indirect effect on the number of sick days through a composite score of need satisfaction (ab = −1.96, 95% CI [−5.11, −0.12]). Mediation models with each need separately indicated that autonomy (ab = −2.12, 95% CI [−5.33, −0.23]) and relatedness (ab = −1.33, 95% CI [−3.41, −0.11]) mediated the relationship between need-supportive leadership and number of sick days. Need-supportive leadership and need satisfaction at work may function as protective factors that provide followers with opportunities to deal with symptoms of ill health and reduce the risk of prolonged sickness absence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
interpersonal behaviors, leadership, self-determination theory, sickness absence, Swedish municipal workers
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220005 (URN)10.1111/apps.12523 (DOI)001142112800001 ()2-s2.0-85182491376 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2013-02130
Available from: 2024-01-31 Created: 2024-01-31 Last updated: 2024-01-31
Stenling, A., Quensell, J., Kaur, N. & Machado, L. (2024). Stair climbing improves cognitive switching performance and mood in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled crossover trial. Journal of Cognitive Enhancement
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stair climbing improves cognitive switching performance and mood in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled crossover trial
2024 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Enhancement, ISSN 2509-3290Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Although stair-climbing intervals provide a simple mode of physical activity that can be easily carried out in naturalistic settings and incorporated into the daily lives of a significant proportion of the global population, addressing physical inactivity issues, very little research has focused on the psychological benefits of stair climbing. To address this, the current prospectively registered randomized controlled crossover trial tested whether brief bouts of stair climbing (6 × 1 min intervals) elicit immediate subsequent improvements in cognitive performance and mood in a sample of healthy young adults (final sample: n = 52, 50% female, age range 18–24 years), with consideration of sex, physical activity habits, and exercise intensity as potentially relevant variables. Compared to a no-exercise control session, following the stair climbing participants exhibited superior cognitive switching performance and reported feeling more energetic and happy. In addition, linear regression analyses linked higher stair-climbing intensity (indicated by heart-rate data) to faster response latencies. None of the effects depended on sex or physical activity habits, which implies that males and females can benefit irrespective of their current physical activity habits. Collectively, these results demonstrate that interval stair climbing can confer immediate psychological benefits, providing further evidence in support of stair climbing as a promising means to address physical inactivity issues. TRN: ACTRN12619000484145, Date of registration: 25/03/2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
Keywords
Affect, Cognition, Executive functioning, Interval training, Physical activity
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223253 (URN)10.1007/s41465-024-00294-1 (DOI)001197540500001 ()2-s2.0-85189284623 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017–00273
Available from: 2024-04-18 Created: 2024-04-18 Last updated: 2024-04-18
Bengtsson, D., Stenling, A., Nygren, J., Ntoumanis, N. & Ivarsson, A. (2024). The effects of interpersonal development programmes with sport coaches and parents on youth athlete outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 70, Article ID 102558.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of interpersonal development programmes with sport coaches and parents on youth athlete outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2024 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 70, article id 102558Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interpersonal coach-and parent development programmes (CDP and PDP, respectively), have the goal to foster positive youth sport experiences through high-quality relations between coaches, parents, and youth athletes. In this paper we systematically reviewed the extant literature and estimate the overall magnitude of such programmes and how they can inform future interventions. Specifically, we aimed to: (a) conduct a systematic review on the literature of interpersonal CDPs and PDPs within the youth sport context; (b) examine the effects of such interventions on youth athlete outcomes via a meta-analysis. English written peer-reviewed publications and grey literature was identified through electronic search in databases and manual searches of reference lists. By utilising a priori criteria for inclusion and exclusion, 33 studies describing interpersonal CDPs, and PDPs were identified in the systematic review. Studies that presented required data for estimation of Hedge's g effect sizes were included in the meta-analysis (k = 27). By and large, the included studies used a quasi-experimental design (58%), sampled from team sports (79%), and reported several delivery methods (e.g., workshops, audio feedback, observations, peer group discussions) and outcome measures (e.g., anxiety, autonomous motivation, self-confidence). Some interventions were based on the same delivery protocols (e.g., Coach Effectiveness Training, Mastery Approach to Coaching) or theoretical frameworks (e.g., Achievement Goal Theory, Self-Determination Theory). The meta-analysis showed statistically significant small, and medium, effect sizes on a subsample of youth athlete outcomes (e.g., task-related climate, fun and enjoyment, anxiety), indicating that coach interpersonal skills can contribute to positive youth sport experiences. Theory-based interpersonal CDPs and PDPs are recommended to expand the knowledge in this field of research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Behaviour change, Design, Effectiveness, Intervention, Youth sport
National Category
Applied Psychology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220755 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2023.102558 (DOI)001127782400001 ()37993028 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183648023 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-12 Created: 2024-02-12 Last updated: 2024-02-12Bibliographically approved
Garn, A. C. & Stenling, A. (2024). University students’ daily motivation regulation: within- and between-level relations to academic functioning. Educational Psychology, 44(2), 227-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>University students’ daily motivation regulation: within- and between-level relations to academic functioning
2024 (English)In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 227-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated daily motivation regulation as a multilevel mediator of undergraduate students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and academic functioning. Undergraduate students (N = 124) completed measures on motivation, motivation regulation, and study time for 10 consecutive days leading up to a statistics exam. Bayesian multilevel mediation models were used to examine motivation regulation as a mediator between motivation and daily study time at the within-person level and exam performance at the between-person level. Within-person findings revealed motivation regulation mediated the relation between both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and study time although the indirect effect was substantially stronger for extrinsic motivation. Between-person findings did not support mediation between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and exam performance. Specifically, none of the motivation or motivation regulation factors predicted students’ exam performance. It appears that motivation regulation typically stems from extrinsic motivation and is more closely associated with process-oriented rather than product-oriented academic functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2024
Keywords
Multilevel mediation, self-regulated learning, situational motivation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-224257 (URN)10.1080/01443410.2024.2331754 (DOI)001204986000001 ()2-s2.0-85190983883 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-14 Created: 2024-05-14 Last updated: 2024-05-14Bibliographically approved
Tafvelin, S., von Thiele Schwarz, U. & Stenling, A. (2023). Can booster activities improve the effectiveness of leadership training?: Comparing coaching to e-mails using a mixed methods design. Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 8(1), Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can booster activities improve the effectiveness of leadership training?: Comparing coaching to e-mails using a mixed methods design
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, E-ISSN 2002-2867, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the widespread use of new information technology, calls have been made for leadership training research to examine if the effects of leadership training can be boosted over time by sending text messages or e-mails, in order to reinforce the lessons learned in training interventions. Based on media synchronicity theory (MST), the purpose of the current study was to contrast the usefulness of two booster activities: traditional telephone coaching, and exercises sent by e-mail. Managers were randomly assigned to one of the two booster conditions. We then used a mixed methods design including both quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate the boosters. We obtained the quantitative data from 20 managers and their 323 employees at four time points: before, during, and after the training. We also used focus group interviews to evaluate managers’ experience of both booster activities. The quantitative analyses indicated statistically significant differences between the two groups after the second session, where managers in the e-mail group scored higher on readiness for change and perceived applicability of the training. The latent growth curve analyses indicated a statistically significant increase in employees’ perception of managers’ autonomy support. The qualitative data suggest that the e-mail booster was considered informative and flexible but also time consuming, while the telephone coaching was perceived as flexible but somewhat unstructured. Our findings suggest that an e-mail booster could be a cost-effective alternative to reinforce lessons learned in leadership training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm University Press, 2023
Keywords
booster activities, coaching, e-mails, leadership training, media synchronicity theory
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215933 (URN)10.16993/sjwop.184 (DOI)2-s2.0-85174632251 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2013-02130
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, R., Tafvelin, S. & Stenling, A. (2023). Depleting pathways of self-sacrificial and laissez-faire leadership: the roles of leader gender and perceived organizational support. International Journal of Stress Management, 30(4), 376-387
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depleting pathways of self-sacrificial and laissez-faire leadership: the roles of leader gender and perceived organizational support
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Stress Management, ISSN 1072-5245, E-ISSN 1573-3424, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 376-387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent findings suggest that certain leadership behaviors may be depleting for both leaders and employees or beneficial for employees but detrimental for leaders. However, factors that raise burnout risks for leaders when acting in a certain way have received less attention. Two potentially relevant factors are leaders’ gender and their perceptions of organizational support (POS). Thus, in this article, we examine the potentially gendered associations between leader burnout and two contrasting leadership styles: laissez-faire and self-sacrificial. We also explore the potential modulation of these associations by leaders’ POS. Using structural equational modeling, we analyze self-reported data collected at two time points (6 months apart) from a panel sample of 767 leaders. The results show that both laissez-faire leadership and self-sacrificial leadership are associated with leaders’ burnout and a laissez-faire style particularly raises the risks for female leaders. Moreover, high POS exacerbates the association between laissez-faire leadership and burnout for female leaders but not male leaders. We discuss both the theoretical and practical implications of these findings, hoping to raise awareness among scholars and organizations of possible approaches to prevent or mitigate leader burnout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association (APA), 2023
Keywords
laissez-faire leadership, self-sacrificial leadership, burnout, gender, organizational support
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214458 (URN)10.1037/str0000305 (DOI)001113937400001 ()2-s2.0-85185156930 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-00066
Available from: 2023-09-15 Created: 2023-09-15 Last updated: 2024-03-21Bibliographically approved
Holmquist, S., Stenling, A., Tafvelin, S., Ntoumanis, N. & Schéle, I. (2023). Dimensionality, invariance, and nomological network of the Need Satisfaction and Frustration Scale (NSFS): an extensive psychometric investigation in a Swedish work cohort. Journal of Personality Assessment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dimensionality, invariance, and nomological network of the Need Satisfaction and Frustration Scale (NSFS): an extensive psychometric investigation in a Swedish work cohort
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Personality Assessment, ISSN 0022-3891, E-ISSN 1532-7752Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study evaluated the dimensionality, measurement invariance, and nomological network of the Need Satisfaction and Frustration Scale (NSFS) in a sample of Swedish workers. Using confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, and bifactor modeling, 30 different measurement models were evaluated cross-sectionally (n = 2123) and longitudinally (n = 1506). Measurement invariance was tested across gender and time. The nomological network of the NSFS was examined through its relations with life satisfaction and cognitive weariness. The findings supported a first-order six-factor ESEM model and measurement invariance of the Swedish version of the NSFS. Need satisfaction was positively related to life satisfaction and unrelated to cognitive weariness. Need frustration was negatively related to life satisfaction and positively related to cognitive weariness. The present study supported a six-factor structure of the Swedish NSFS, which appears suitable for assessing changes over time and gender differences in ratings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199248 (URN)10.1080/00223891.2023.2258960 (DOI)001075351500001 ()37772753 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173974614 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2022-09-09 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2023-11-01
Stavnsbo, M., Stenling, A., Berntsen, S., Chinapaw, M. J. M., Hansen, B. H., Manios, Y., . . . Bere, E. (2023). Does an obesogenic family environment moderate the association between sports participation and body composition in children? The ENERGY project. Pediatric Obesity, 18(7), Article ID e13031.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does an obesogenic family environment moderate the association between sports participation and body composition in children? The ENERGY project
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2023 (English)In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e13031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research on the association between sports participation and body composition has shown mixed findings. The family home is considered one of the most influential environments on childhood obesity. Thus, the association between sports participation and body composition in children may be influenced by an obesogenic home environment. Objectives: To investigate if an obesogenic family environment moderates the association between sports participation and body composition in children.

Methods: A total of 3999 children (54% girls; 11.6 ± 0.7 years) and their parent(s) were included from the ENERGY project. A composite obesogenic family environment risk score was created from 10 questionnaire items. Height, weight (to calculate body mass index), and waist circumference were obtained by trained researchers and used as indicators of body composition.

Results: The composite risk score significantly moderated the association between sports participation and both waist circumference and body mass index. In children from families with moderate and high obesogenic risk, organized sports participation was significantly associated with smaller waist circumference (moderate risk: −0.29, 95% CI −0.45 to −0.14; high risk: −0.46, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.25) and lower body mass index (moderate risk: −0.10, 95% CI −0.16 to −0.04; high risk: −0.14, 95% CI −0.22 to −0.06), but not in children with a low obesogenic family risk score.

Conclusions: Enrolling children in sports activities from an early age can be important for healthy weight maintenance, especially among children from obesogenic family environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
obesity, obesogenic environment, overweight, paediatrics, physical activity
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206765 (URN)10.1111/ijpo.13031 (DOI)000962099300001 ()37014019 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151930848 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 223254
Available from: 2023-04-28 Created: 2023-04-28 Last updated: 2023-07-12Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Strandberg, E., Stenling, A., Mazzoni, A.-S., Sjövall, K., Börjeson, S., . . . Nordin, K. (2023). Does inflammation markers or treatment type moderate exercise intensity effects on changes in muscle strength in cancer survivors participating in a 6-month combined resistance- and endurance exercise program?: Results from the phys-can trial. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, 15(1), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does inflammation markers or treatment type moderate exercise intensity effects on changes in muscle strength in cancer survivors participating in a 6-month combined resistance- and endurance exercise program?: Results from the phys-can trial
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2023 (English)In: BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 2052-1847 , Vol. 15, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Resistance exercise has a beneficial impact on physical function for patients receiving oncological treatment. However, there is an inter-individual variation in the response to exercise and the tolerability to high-intensity exercise. Identifying potential moderating factors, such as inflammation and treatment type, for changes in muscle strength is important to improve the effectiveness of exercise programs. Therefore, we aimed to investigate if inflammation and type of oncological treatment moderate the effects of exercise intensity (high vs. low-moderate) on muscular strength changes in patients with breast (BRCA) or prostate cancer (PRCA).

Methods: Participants with BRCA (n = 286) and PRCA (n = 65) from the Physical training and Cancer study (Phys-Can) were included in the present study. Participants performed a combined resistance- and endurance exercise program during six months, at either high or low-moderate intensity. Separate regression models were estimated for each cancer type, with and without interaction terms. Moderators included in the models were treatment type (i.e., neo/adjuvant chemotherapy—yes/no for BRCA, adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT)—yes/no for PRCA)), and inflammation (interleukin 6 (IL6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)) at follow-up.

Results: For BRCA, neither IL6 (b = 2.469, 95% CI [− 7.614, 12.552]) nor TNFα (b = 0.036, 95% CI [− 6.345, 6.418]) levels moderated the effect of exercise intensity on muscle strength change. The same was observed for chemotherapy treatment (b = 4.893, 95% CI [− 2.938, 12.724]). Similarly, for PRCA, the effect of exercise intensity on muscle strength change was not moderated by IL6 (b = − 1.423, 95% CI [− 17.894, 15.048]) and TNFα (b = − 1.905, 95% CI [− 8.542, 4.732]) levels, nor by ADT (b = − 0.180, 95% CI [− 11.201, 10.841]).

Conclusions: The effect of exercise intensity on muscle strength is not moderated by TNFα, IL6, neo/adjuvant chemotherapy, or ADT, and therefore cannot explain any intra-variation of training response regarding exercise intensity (e.g., strength gain) for BRCA or PRCA in this setting.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02473003.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Androgen deprivation therapy, Cancer, Chemotherapy, Exercise intensity, Inflammation, Moderators, Resistance training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204522 (URN)10.1186/s13102-023-00617-3 (DOI)000914000300001 ()2-s2.0-85146692857 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 150841Swedish Cancer Society, 160483Swedish Research Council, KDB/9514
Available from: 2023-02-06 Created: 2023-02-06 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Western, B., Demmelmaier, I., Vistad, I., Hansen, B. H., Stenling, A., Henriksen, H. B., . . . Berntsen, S. (2023). How many days of continuous physical activity monitoring reliably represent time in different intensities in cancer survivors. PLOS ONE, 18(4), Article ID e0284881.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How many days of continuous physical activity monitoring reliably represent time in different intensities in cancer survivors
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2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 4, article id e0284881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) monitoring is applied in a growing number of studies within cancer research. However, no consensus exists on how many days PA should be monitored to obtain reliable estimates in the cancer population. The objective of the present study was to determine the minimum number of monitoring days required for reliable estimates of different PA intensities in cancer survivors when using a six-days protocol. Furthermore, reliability of monitoring days was assessed stratified on sex, age, cancer type, weight status, and educational level.

METHODS: Data was obtained from two studies where PA was monitored for seven days using the SenseWear Armband Mini in a total of 984 cancer survivors diagnosed with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer. Participants with ≥22 hours monitor wear-time for six days were included in the reliability analysis (n = 736). The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Spearman Brown prophecy formula were used to assess the reliability of different number of monitoring days.

RESULTS: For time in light PA, two monitoring days resulted in reliable estimates (ICC >0.80). Participants with BMI ≥25, low-medium education, colorectal cancer, or age ≥60 years required one additional monitoring day. For moderate and moderate-to-vigorous PA, three monitoring days yielded reliable estimates. Participants with BMI ≥25 or breast cancer required one additional monitoring day. Vigorous PA showed the largest within subject variations and reliable estimates were not obtained for the sample as a whole. However, reliable estimates were obtained for breast cancer survivors (4 days), females, BMI ≥30, and age <60 years (6 days).

CONCLUSION: Shorter monitoring periods may provide reliable estimates of PA levels in cancer survivors when monitored continuously with a wearable device. This could potentially lower the participant burden and allow for less exclusion of participants not adhering to longer protocols.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207863 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0284881 (DOI)000984510200038 ()37093874 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85153687137 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-11 Created: 2023-05-11 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
A life-span perspective on physical activity, fitness, cognitive function, and mental health: Longitudinal associations, explanatory mechanisms, and moderators [2017-00273_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0834-1040

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