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Brännström, MargaretaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1688-8991
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Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Fischer Grönlund, C., Isaksson, U. & Brännström, M. (2023). Moral distress thermometer: Swedish translation, cultural adaptation and validation. Nursing Ethics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moral distress thermometer: Swedish translation, cultural adaptation and validation
2023 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Moral distress is a problem and negative experience among health-care professionals. Various instruments have been developed to measure the level and underlying reasons for experienced moral distress. The moral distress thermometer (MDT) is a single-tool instrument to capture the level of moral distress experienced in real-time.

Aim: The aim of this study was to translate the MDT and adapt it to the Swedish cultural context. R

esearch design: The first part of this study concerns the translation of MDT to the Swedish context, and the second part the psychometric testing of the Swedish version.

Participants and research context: 89 healthcare professionals working at a hospital in northern Sweden participated. Convergent validity was tested between MDT and Measure of Moral Distress-Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP), and construct validity was tested by comparing MDT scores among healthcare professionals. MDT was compared with responses to the final questions in MMD-HP. One-way ANOVA, Welch’s ANOVA, Games–Howell post-hoc test and Pearson’s correlation analysis were done.

Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the Swedish Ethics Review Authority (dnr 2020-04120) in accordance with Helsinki Declaration.

Results: The translated Swedish version of MDT was described as relevant to capture the experience of moral distress. The mean value for MDT was 2.26, with a median of 2 and a mode value of 0. The result showed moderate correlations between the MDT and MMD-HP total scores. There was a significant difference when comparing MDT and healthcare professionals who had never considered leaving their present position with those who had left and those who had considered leaving but had not done so, with the latter assessing significantly higher moral distress.

Conclusion: The MDT is an easily available instrument useful as an extension to MMD-HP to measure the real-time experience of moral distress among healthcare professionals in a Swedish context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
health care professionals, instrument, moral distress, questionnaire, translation, validation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215080 (URN)10.1177/09697330231197707 (DOI)2-s2.0-85172656359 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Umeå UniversityKarolinska Institute
Available from: 2023-10-13 Created: 2023-10-13 Last updated: 2023-10-13
Fischer Grönlund, C., Brännström, M. & Isaksson, U. (2023). Psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the measure of moral distress for healthcare professionals (MMD-HP). BMC Medical Ethics, 24(1), Article ID 35.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the measure of moral distress for healthcare professionals (MMD-HP)
2023 (English)In: BMC Medical Ethics, ISSN 1472-6939, E-ISSN 1472-6939, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Moral distress has been described as moral constraints and uncertainty connected with guilty feelings of being unable to give care in accordance with one's values for good care. Various instruments to measure moral distress have been developed. The instrument measure of moral distress for healthcare professionals (MMD-HP) was developed to capture the experience and frequency of moral distress among various healthcare professionals. The MMD-HP has been translated and culturally adapted into the Swedish language and context; however, the translation has not been validated. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the measure of moral distress for healthcare professionals (MMD-HP).

Methods: Eighty-nine staff from various professions at a hospital in northern Sweden participated in the study. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed to check for consistency with the original version of the MMD-HP. To evaluate internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha was calculated for each domain and for the scale as a whole.

Results: The scale as a whole showed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.96, with a range between 0.84 and 0.90 between the different subscales. A confirmatory factor analysis based on the original four-factor structure showed good fit indices with a χ2/df of 0.67, CFI at 1.00, TLI at 1.02 and NFI at 0.97. RMSEA was at 0.00, and SRMR was at 0.08. A comparison of the total score between three equally large groups of years of experience at the present workplace showed no significant differences (F = 0.09, df = 2, p = 0.912).

Conclusions: We found that the Swedish version of the MMD-HP has shown validity and reliability for use in a Swedish context for measuring moral distress among health personnel.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Moral distress, Instrument, Measure, Healthcare professionals, Psychometrics, Validation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208781 (URN)10.1186/s12910-023-00916-x (DOI)000997702200001 ()37254086 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160608925 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Karolinska InstituteUmeå University
Available from: 2023-05-31 Created: 2023-05-31 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Martinsson, L., Brännström, M. & Andersson, S. (2023). Symptom assessment in the dying: family members versus healthcare professionals. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom assessment in the dying: family members versus healthcare professionals
2023 (English)In: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, ISSN 2045-435X, E-ISSN 2045-4368Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Symptom management and support of the family members (FMs) are consideredessential aspects of palliative care. During end of life, patients are often not able to self-reportsymptoms. There is little knowledge in the literature of how healthcare professionals(HCPs) assess symptoms compared with FMs.The objective was to compare the assessment ofsymptoms and symptom relief during the final week of life between what was reported by FMsand what was reported by HCPs.

Methods: Data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care from 2021 and 2022 were usedto compare congruity of the assessments by the FMs and by HCPs regarding occurrence and reliefof three symptoms (pain, anxiety and confusion), using Cohen’s kappa.

Results: A total of 1131 patients were included. The agreement between FMs and HCPs was poorfor occurrence of pain and confusion (kappa 0.25 and 0.16), but fair for occurrence of anxiety(kappa 0.30). When agreeing on a symptom being present, agreement on relief of thatsymptom was poor (kappa 0.04 for pain, 0.10 for anxiety and 0.01 for confusion). The trendwas that HCPs more often rated occurrence of pain and anxiety, less often occurrence ofconfusion and more often complete symptom relief compared with the FMs.

Conclusions: The views of FMs and HCPs of the patients’ symptoms differ in the end-of-life context, but both report important information and their symptom assessments should beconsidered both together and individually. More communication between HCPs and FMs couldprobably bridge some of these differences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
family members, healthcare professional, palliative care, symptom management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216845 (URN)10.1136/spcare-2023-004382 (DOI)37973205 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178282975 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-17 Created: 2023-11-17 Last updated: 2023-12-12
Hellström Ängerud, K., Ericsson, M., Brännström, M., Sederholm Lawesson, S., Strömberg, A. & Thylén, I. (2023). Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction as Described in Calls to Tele-Nurses and in Questionnaires. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 38(2), 150-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction as Described in Calls to Tele-Nurses and in Questionnaires
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patient-reported symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (MI) may be affected by recall bias depending on when and where symptoms are assessed.

Aim: The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of patients' symptom description in more detail before and within 24 hours after a confirmed MI diagnosis.

Methods: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was used to examine symptoms described in calls between the tele-nurse and the patient compared with symptoms selected by the patient from a questionnaire less than 24 hours after hospital admission. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately and then merged into a final interpretation.

Results: Thirty patients (median age, 67.5 years; 20 men) were included. Chest pain was the most commonly reported symptom in questionnaires (24/30). Likewise, in 19 of 30 calls, chest pain was the first complaint mentioned, usually described together with the symptom onset. Expressions used to describe symptom quality were pain, pressure, discomfort, ache, cramp, tension, and soreness. Associated symptoms commonly described were pain or numbness in the arms, cold sweat, dyspnea, weakness, and nausea. Bodily sensations, such as feeling unwell or weak, were also described. Fear and tiredness were described in calls significantly less often than reported in questionnaires (P = .01 and P = .02), whereas “other” symptoms were more often mentioned in calls compared with answers given in the questionnaire (P = .02). Some symptoms expressed in the calls were not listed in the questionnaire, which expands the understanding of acute MI symptoms. The results showed no major inconsistencies between datasets.

Conclusion: Patients' MI symptom descriptions in tele-calls and those reported in questionnaires after diagnosis are comparable and convergent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2023
Keywords
Advanced and Specialised Nursing, Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190169 (URN)10.1097/jcn.0000000000000873 (DOI)000942350000015 ()36156094 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147783172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-08 Created: 2021-12-08 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Hedman, M., Doolan-Noble, F., Stokes, T. & Brännström, M. (2022). Doctors’ experiences of providing care in rural hospitals in Southern New Zealand: a qualitative study. BMJ Open, 12(12), Article ID e062968.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctors’ experiences of providing care in rural hospitals in Southern New Zealand: a qualitative study
2022 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e062968Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore rural hospital doctors’ experiences of providing care in New Zealand rural hospitals.

Design: The study had a qualitative design, using qualitative content analysis.

Setting: The study was conducted in South Island, New Zealand, and included nine different rural hospitals.

Respondents: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 rural hospital doctors.

Results: Three themes were identified: ‘Applying a holistic perspective in the care’, ‘striving to maintain patient safety in sparsely populated areas’ and ‘cooperating in different teams around the patient’. Rural hospital care more than general hospital care was seen as offering a holistic perspective on patient care based on closeness to their home and family, the generalist perspective of care and personal continuity. The presentation of acute life-threatening low-frequency conditions at rural hospitals were associated with feelings of concern due to limited access to ambulance transportation and lack of experience.

Overall, however, patient safety in rural hospitals was considered equal or better than in general hospitals. Doctors emphasised the central role of rural hospitals in the healthcare pathways of rural patients, and the advantages and disadvantages with small non-hierarchical multidisciplinary teams caring for patients. Collaboration with hospital specialists was generally perceived as good, although there was a sense that urban colleagues do not understand the additional medical and practical assessments needed in rural compared with the urban context.

Conclusions: This study provides an understanding of how rural hospital doctors value the holistic generalist perspective of rural hospital care, and of how they perceive the quality and safety of that care. The long distances to general hospital care for acute cases were considered concerning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2022
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201540 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-062968 (DOI)000896763700018 ()2-s2.0-85143886080 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Society of Medicine, SLS-787391Region VästerbottenThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2022-12-07 Created: 2022-12-07 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Fischer Grönlund, C. & Brännström, M. (2022). Postgraduate nursing students’ experiences of practicing ethical communication. Nursing Ethics, 29(7-8), 1709-1720
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postgraduate nursing students’ experiences of practicing ethical communication
2022 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 29, no 7-8, p. 1709-1720Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Ethics communication has been described as a pedagogical form, promoting development of ethical competence among nursing students. The ‘one to five method’ was developed by this research group as a tool for facilitating ethical communication in groups among healthcare professionals but has not yet been evaluated.

Aim: To explore post-graduate nursing students’ experiences of practicing ethical communication in groups.

Research design: The study design is qualitative.

Participants and research context: The study comprised 12 nursing students on a post-graduate course for Registered Nurses focusing on palliative care. After education the students engaged as participants and facilitators in ethics communication in groups, with support from the ‘one to five method’. Data were derived from the students written reflections and subjected to thematic analysis.

Ethical considerations: The study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards in the 2013 Helsinki Declaration and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty at Umeå University.

Results: An overall theme was identified, ‘being supported to achieve a democratic dialogue concerning ethical problems’ and five themes, related to each step of the ‘one to five method’. The themes concerned: putting the experience of an ethical dilemma into words; being confirmed by shared emotions; defining the value conflict using ethical principles; expressing virtues of empathy and raised awareness; jointly finding various action approaches.

Discussion: Regular ethics communication in groups encourages nursing students to actively seek understanding and clarification of ethically difficult situations.

Conclusions: The results indicate that ethics communication in groups could be a way of developing virtues during education. Interventions using the ‘one to five method’ need to be further studied among student groups from other healthcare contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Clinical ethical support, democratic dialogue, ethics communication, ethics education, nursing student, ‘the one to five method’
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-198048 (URN)10.1177/09697330221109943 (DOI)000822285000001 ()35773019 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85133389580 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-07-14 Created: 2022-07-14 Last updated: 2022-12-30Bibliographically approved
Öhlén, J., Böling, S., HamdanAlshehri, H., Brännström, M., Henoch, I., Hessman, E., . . . Ozanne, A. (2022). Strategies for knowledge translation of a palliative approach outside specialized palliative care services: a scoping review. BMC Palliative Care, 21(1), Article ID 39.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategies for knowledge translation of a palliative approach outside specialized palliative care services: a scoping review
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2022 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 39Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Research suggests palliative care to be translated and integrated in non-specialized palliative care services throughout the palliative care continuum across populations and settings. A need has been identified to build on the existing research literature in order to design strong knowledge translation strategies that can be evaluated in future research. The aim was to map strategies for knowledge translation of a palliative approach to care into non-specialized palliative care services for adult patients. The objectives were to explore the primary research activities, the specific type of knowledge translation strategies used, the research designs and study settings for such evaluations along with the major results thereof, and to identify major research gaps in this area.

METHODS: A scoping review was performed to map the volume and characteristics of research literature (project registered in PROSPERO #2018 CRD42018100663). The ten-year period 2010 to 2019 was searched in six major databases for original articles published in English in which the knowledge translation of a palliative approach for adult patients was evaluated in non-specialized palliative healthcare settings, and all type of empirical data-based research designs. We excluded non-English, non-empirical articles, non-evaluation of knowledge translations, specialized palliative care settings, and other types of publications (i.e. non-original articles).

RESULTS: Most of the 183 included articles focused on patients with cancer who were dying in hospitals and in high income countries. Only 13 articles focused on early palliative care. A palette of different strategies was used to implement palliative care in non-specialist palliative settings; no strategy was identified as outstanding. The majority of the articles had unspecified essential components of the research designs.

CONCLUSION: Previous suggestions for utilization of implementation science for knowledge translation of a palliative approach to care into non-specialized palliative care services are confirmed, and established knowledge translation theories can strengthen the field. To advance this specific field of knowledge, meticulously detailed reporting of studies is required as related to research designs, clarifications of contextual influences and mechanisms at work. Specific systematic reviews and meta-syntheses in the field are merited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Delivery of health care, integrated, Diffusion of innovation, Implementation science, Palliative care, Review
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193265 (URN)10.1186/s12904-022-00929-0 (DOI)000772188600002 ()35317795 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85126905965 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Granat, L., Andersson, S., Hadziabdic, E., Brännström, M. & Sandgren, A. (2022). Translation, adaptation, and validation of the Self-efficacy in Palliative Care scale (SEPC) for use in Swedish healthcare settings. BMC Palliative Care, 21(1), Article ID 48.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation, adaptation, and validation of the Self-efficacy in Palliative Care scale (SEPC) for use in Swedish healthcare settings
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2022 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: One challenge for healthcare professionals when delivering palliative care can be their lack of confidence. The Self-efficacy in Palliative Care Scale (SEPC) is considered a valid and reliable assessment scale to evaluate confidence when delivering palliative care. Currently, there is not a reliable instrument aimed to measure healthcare professionals’ confidence in palliative care in Swedish. Therefore, this study aimed to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the SEPC-scale for use in a Swedish healthcare context.

Methods: This study applied the World Health Organization’s (WHO) guidelines for translating and adapting instruments, using forward and back-translation, an expert panel, and cognitive interviews. Swedish experts in palliative care (n = 6) assessed the Swedish version of the SEPC-scale based on its relevance, understandability, clarity, and sensitivity on a Likert scale. Methods involved calculation of content validity index (CVI) with modified kappa statistics and cognitive interviewing with healthcare professionals (n = 10) according to the “think-aloud” method.

Results: Calculation of I-CVI (Item-CVI) showed that the Swedish SEPC-scale was considered relevant but needed some modifications to improve its understandability and clarity. The experts recognized an absence of precision in some items that affected clarity and understanding. Likewise, the healthcare professionals highlighted some challenges with understandability and clarity. They indicated that the scale was relevant, but a few items needed adjustment to fit a broader range of healthcare professionals. Items that referred to death and dying could be sensitive but were considered relevant.

Conclusions: The SEPC-scale is considered valid for use in Swedish healthcare practice, for a broad range of healthcare professionals, and for diagnoses other than cancer. This study shows that cultural adaptation is necessary for establishing relevance and enabling acceptance to various healthcare professionals and contexts in the target country.necessary for establishing relevance and enabling acceptance to various healthcare professionals and contexts in the target country.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Confdence, Healthcare professionals, Instrument, Palliative care, Self-efcacy, SEPC-scale, Validation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193907 (URN)10.1186/s12904-022-00940-5 (DOI)000781170600001 ()35410328 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128049591 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20172002
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Andersson, S., Granat, L., Brännström, M. & Sandgren, A. (2022). Translation, Cultural Adaptation, and Content Validation of the Palliative Care Self-Efficacy Scale for Use in the Swedish Context. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(3), Article ID 1143.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation, Cultural Adaptation, and Content Validation of the Palliative Care Self-Efficacy Scale for Use in the Swedish Context
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 3, article id 1143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Palliative Care Self-Efficacy Scale (PCSE) is a valid instrument in English for assessing healthcare professionals’ self-efficacy in providing palliative care; it has not been translated into Swedish. The aim of this study was to describe the translation, cultural adaptation, and contentvalidation process of the PCSE scale. In this study, forward and backward translations, pre-testingincluding an expert panel (n = 7), and cognitive interviewing with possible healthcare professionals (physicians, nurses, and assistant nurses) (n = 10) were performed. Experts in palliative care rateditems on a Likert scale based on their understandability, clarity, sensitivity, and relevance. The item-level content validity index (I-CVI) and modified kappa statistics were calculated. Healthcareprofessionals were interviewed using the think-aloud method. The translation and validation process resulted in the final version of the PCSE scale. The average I-CVI for sensitivity was evaluated andapproved. Most of the items were approved for clarity, some items lacked understandability, but a majority of the items were considered relevant. The healthcare professionals agreed that the items in the questionnaire evoked emotions, but were relevant for healthcare professionals. Thus, the Palliative Care Self-Efficacy scale is relevant for assessing healthcare professionals’ self-efficacy inpalliative care in a Swedish care context. Further research using psychometric tests is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
content validity, end-of-life, face validity, healthcare professionals, palliative care, PCSE scale
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191686 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19031143 (DOI)000754580000001 ()2-s2.0-85122935875 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20152002
Available from: 2022-01-21 Created: 2022-01-21 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Hedman, M., Boman, K., Brännström, M. & Wennberg, P. (2021). Clinical profile of rural community hospital inpatients in Sweden: a register study. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 39(1), 92-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical profile of rural community hospital inpatients in Sweden: a register study
2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Patients in Sweden's rural community hospitals have not been clinically characterised. We compared characteristics of patients in general practitioner-led community hospitals in northern Sweden with those admitted to general hospitals.

DESIGN: Retrospective register study.

SETTING: Community and general hospitals in Västerbotten and Norrbotten counties, Sweden.

PATIENTS: Patients enrolled at community hospitals and hospitalised in community and general hospitals between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014.

OUTCOME MEASURES: Age, sex, number of admissions, main, secondary and total number of diagnoses.

RESULTS: We recorded 16,133 admissions to community hospitals and 60,704 admissions to general hospitals. Mean age was 76.8 and 61.2 years for community and general hospital patients (p < .001). Women were more likely than men to be admitted to a community hospital after age adjustment (odds ratio (OR): 1.11; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.17). The most common diagnoses in community hospital were heart failure (6%) and pneumonia (5%). Patients with these diagnoses were more likely to be admitted to a community than a general hospital (OR: 2.36; 95% CI: 2.15-2.59; vs. OR: 3.32: 95% CI: 2.77-3.98, respectively, adjusted for age and sex). In both community and general hospitals, doctors assigned more diagnoses to men than to women (both p<.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients at community hospitals were predominantly older and women, while men were assigned more diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were heart failure and pneumonia. Our observed differences should be further explored to define the optimal care for patients in community and general hospitals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2021
Keywords
Rural health service, geriatrics, health services for the aged, health services research, hospital, inpatient, rural
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180124 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2021.1882086 (DOI)000617184000001 ()33569976 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85100975798 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-15 Created: 2021-02-15 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
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