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Bindler, Richard
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Publications (10 of 106) Show all publications
Ninnes, S., Meyer-Jacob, C., Tolu, J., Bindler, R. & Martínez Cortizas, A. (2024). Application of mid-infrared spectroscopy for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic matter in Holocene sediment records. The Holocene, 34(3), 259-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of mid-infrared spectroscopy for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic matter in Holocene sediment records
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2024 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 259-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The organic matter composition of lake sediments influences important in-lake biogeochemical processes and stores information on environmental changes. Extracting this information is notoriously difficult because of the complexity of the organic matter matrix, which routinely imposes trade-offs between high temporal and analytical detail in the selection of methods of analysis. Here, we demonstrate the potential of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for achieving both of these objectives using untreated bulk samples from two Holocene lake-sediment cores from central Sweden. We develop quantitative models for sediment total organic carbon (TOC) with the same predictive abilities as models based on samples diluted with KBr and qualitatively characterize the organic matter using a spectra processing-pipeline combined with principal component analysis. In the qualitative analysis we identified four organic matter sub-fractions and the interpretation of these is supported and further advanced with molecular data from pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Within these organic fractions, compound groups such as aromatics, lignin, aliphatics, proteins and polysaccharides were identified by means of DRIFTS and the analyses and processes outlined here enables rapid and detailed quantitative and qualitative analysis of sediment organic matter. The DRIFTS approach can be used as stand-alone method for OM characterization with high temporal resolution in Holocene sediment records. It may also function as a screening process for more specific analyses of sample subsets, such as when coupled with pyrolysis-GC/MS to further tease apart the OM composition, identify sources and determine degradation status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213750 (URN)10.1177/09596836231211872 (DOI)001111087400001 ()2-s2.0-85178427803 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0083Swedish Research Council, 2014-05219
Note

Originally included in thesis in accepted form. 

Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Bertrand, S., Tjallingii, R., Kylander, M. E., Wilhelm, B., Roberts, S. J., Arnaud, F., . . . Bindler, R. (2024). Inorganic geochemistry of lake sediments: a review of analytical techniques and guidelines for data interpretation. Earth-Science Reviews, 249, Article ID 104639.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inorganic geochemistry of lake sediments: a review of analytical techniques and guidelines for data interpretation
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2024 (English)In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 249, article id 104639Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inorganic geochemistry is a powerful tool in paleolimnology. It has become one of the most commonly used techniques to analyze lake sediments, particularly due to the development and increasing availability of XRF core scanners during the last two decades. It allows for the reconstruction of the continuous processes that occur in lakes and their watersheds, and it is ideally suited to identify event deposits. How earth surface processes and limnological conditions are recorded in the inorganic geochemical composition of lake sediments is, however, relatively complex. Here, we review the main techniques used for the inorganic geochemical analysis of lake sediments and we offer guidance on sample preparation and instrument selection. We then summarize the best practices to process and interpret bulk inorganic geochemical data. In particular, we emphasize that log-ratio transformation is critical for the rigorous statistical analysis of geochemical datasets, whether they are obtained by XRF core scanning or more traditional techniques. In addition, we show that accurately interpreting inorganic geochemical data requires a sound understanding of the main components of the sediment (organic matter, biogenic silica, carbonates, lithogenic particles) and mineral assemblages. Finally, we provide a series of examples illustrating the potential and limits of inorganic geochemistry in paleolimnology. Although the examples presented in this paper focus on lake and fjord sediments, the principles presented here also apply to other sedimentary environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Calibration, Compositional data, Grain size, Normalization, Provenance, Statistical exploration, XRF core scanner
National Category
Geochemistry Inorganic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-221820 (URN)10.1016/j.earscirev.2023.104639 (DOI)001141058400001 ()2-s2.0-85185938187 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-12 Created: 2024-03-12 Last updated: 2024-03-12Bibliographically approved
Kylander, M. E., Martínez-Cortizas, A., Sjöström, J. K., Gåling, J., Gyllencreutz, R., Bindler, R., . . . Gallagher, K. (2023). Storm chasing: Tracking Holocene storminess in southern Sweden using mineral proxies from inland and coastal peat bogs. Quaternary Science Reviews, 299, Article ID 107854.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storm chasing: Tracking Holocene storminess in southern Sweden using mineral proxies from inland and coastal peat bogs
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2023 (English)In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 299, article id 107854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Severe extratropical winter storms are a recurrent feature of the European climate and cause widespread socioeconomic losses. Due to insufficient long-term data, it remains unclear whether storminess has shown a notable response to changes in external forcing over the past millennia, which impacts our ability to project future storminess in a changing climate. Reconstructing past storm variability is essential to improving our understanding of storms on these longer, missing timescales. Peat sequences from coastal ombrotrophic bogs are increasingly used for this purpose, where greater quantities of coarser grained beach sand are deposited by strong winds during storm events. Moving inland however, storm intensity decreases, as does sand availability, muting potential paleostorm signals in bogs. We circumvent these issues by taking the innovative approach of using mid-infrared (MIR) spectral data, supported by elemental information, from the inorganic fraction of Store Mosse Dune South (SMDS), a 5000-year-old sequence from a large peatland located in southern Sweden. We infer past changes in mineral composition and thereby, the grain size of the deposited material. The record is dominated by quartz, whose coarse nature was confirmed through analyses of potential local source sediments. This was supported by further mineralogical and elemental proxies of atmospheric input. Comparison of SMDS with within-bog and regionally relevant records showed that there is a difference in proxy and site response to what should be similar timing in shifts in storminess over the ∼100 km transect considered. We suggest the construction of regional storm stacks, built here by applying changepoint modelling to four transect sites jointly. This modelling approach has the effect of reinforcing signals in common while reducing the influence of random noise. The resulting Southern Sweden-Storm Stack dates stormier periods to 4495–4290, 3880–3790, 2885–2855, 2300–2005, 1175–1065 and 715-425 cal yr BP. By comparing with a newly constructed Western Scotland-Storm Stack and proximal dune records, we argue that regional storm stacks allow us to better compare past storminess over wider areas, gauge storm track movements and by extension, increase our understanding of the drivers of storminess on centennial to millennial timescales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Holocene, Inorganic geochemistry, Mineralogy, Paleoclimate, Peat, Scandinavia, Storms
National Category
Geology Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201456 (URN)10.1016/j.quascirev.2022.107854 (DOI)000917017800010 ()2-s2.0-85142750856 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-03434Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01536Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01000
Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sjöström, J., Bindler, R., Martínez Cortizas, A., Björck, S., Hansson, S., Karlsson, A., . . . Kylander, M. (2022). Late Holocene peat paleodust deposition in south-western Sweden: exploring geochemical properties, local mineral sources and regional aeolian activity. Chemical Geology, 602, Article ID 120881.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Late Holocene peat paleodust deposition in south-western Sweden: exploring geochemical properties, local mineral sources and regional aeolian activity
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2022 (English)In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 602, article id 120881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Atmospheric mineral dust not only interacts with the climate system by scattering incoming solar radiation and affecting atmospheric photochemistry, but also contributes critical nutrients to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. In a high-resolution analysis of paleodust deposition, peat development and soil dust sources, we assess the interplay between dust deposition and bog development of the Davidsmosse bog in south-western Sweden. Analyses of the 5400-year record (458 cm) included radiocarbon dating, bulk density, ash content, chemical and mineralogical composition and carbon stable isotopes, subsequently explored using principal component analysis. Fourteen dust events (DEs) were recorded (cal BP) in the peat sequence: 3580–3490; 3280; 3140; 3010–2840; 2740; 2610; 2480; 2340; 2240–2130; 1690; 1240; 960, 890–760, and 620–360. The majority of the DEs were coupled to increases in peat accumulation rates and increased nutrient content (N, P and K) suggesting that the DEs contributed with nutrients to the bog ecosystem, promoting increased accumulation. We also analyzed the chemical and mineral composition of potential mineral source deposits (separated into 6 grain-size fractions) from sites within a 4 km radius as well as aeolian dunes closer to the coast (25 km). The composition deposited on the present-day bog surface indicates that the bulk of the contemporary minerals have a local origin (<1.5 km), but the DEs may be of a more distant origin. The results also indicate that quartz and plagioclase feldspar content consistently increase with increasing grain-size, both in the source samples as well as in the peat sequence, and that the Si/Al ratio can be used to infer grain size changes in the peat. Two longer phases saw numerous DEs, between 2800 and 2130 cal BP and a stepwise increase from 960 towards 360 cal BP. The episodic character of the events, together with the inferred coarse grain size, suggest that the particles were deposited by (winter) storms. Future studies should include grain size analysis as well as a more in-depth comparison with regional paleo dust and storm records to increase knowledge on both transport processes (creep, saltation, suspension) and the climate processes driving late Holocene dust and storm events in Scandinavia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Carbon accumulation, Fertilization, Mineral dust, Peat, Peat accumulation rate, Storms
National Category
Geology Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-194831 (URN)10.1016/j.chemgeo.2022.120881 (DOI)000797248500001 ()2-s2.0-85129778227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-01 Created: 2022-06-01 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Nota, K., Klaminder, J., Milesi, P., Bindler, R., Nobile, A., van Steijn, T., . . . Parducci, L. (2022). Norway spruce postglacial recolonization of Fennoscandia. Nature Communications, 13(1), Article ID 1333.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Norway spruce postglacial recolonization of Fennoscandia
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2022 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contrasting theories exist regarding how Norway spruce (Picea abies) recolonized Fennoscandia after the last glaciation and both early Holocene establishments from western microrefugia and late Holocene colonization from the east have been postulated. Here, we show that Norway spruce was present in southern Fennoscandia as early as 14.7 ± 0.1 cal. kyr BP and that the millennia-old clonal spruce trees present today in central Sweden likely arrived with an early Holocene migration from the east. Our findings are based on ancient sedimentary DNA from multiple European sites (N = 15) combined with nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analysis of ancient clonal (N = 135) and contemporary spruce forest trees (N = 129) from central Sweden. Our other findings imply that Norway spruce was present shortly after deglaciation at the margins of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, and support previously disputed finds of pollen in southern Sweden claiming spruce establishment during the Lateglacial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2022
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193399 (URN)10.1038/s41467-022-28976-4 (DOI)000769063600023 ()35288569 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85126691893 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-04548Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2018-05973
Available from: 2022-04-12 Created: 2022-04-12 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Lin, Q., Liu, E., Zhang, E., Bindler, R., Nath, B., Zhang, K. & Shen, J. (2022). Spatial variation of organic carbon sequestration in large lakes and implications for carbon stock quantification. Catena (Cremlingen. Print), 208, Article ID 105768.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial variation of organic carbon sequestration in large lakes and implications for carbon stock quantification
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2022 (English)In: Catena (Cremlingen. Print), ISSN 0341-8162, E-ISSN 1872-6887, Vol. 208, article id 105768Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lakes are recognized as critical zones for carbon transformation and storage, and lacustrine sediments sequestrate considerable amounts of organic carbon (OC). Understanding sedimentation processes and OC burial patterns is crucial to clarifying lakes’ role in global carbon cycling. However, OC sedimentation may be quite spatially heterogeneous within an aquatic system, owing to the differences in OC production and sources, hydrodynamic conditions and underwater topography. The uncertainties in estimating OC sequestration in the world’s large lakes remain poorly constrained. This study takes the test case of two large lakes (50 and 249 km2) with different water depth and trophic status, using a multi-core paleolimnological technique, to identify the spatial variation in OC accumulation and its main influencing factors over the past century. Results of multi-core comparisons revealed similar temporal trends in major organic and nutrient parameters, suggesting coherent processes of whole-lake sedimentary environment changes for each lake. The OC preserved in sediments was primarily of autochthonous origin. However, OC standing stocks varied ∼3-fold spatially, and average OC accumulation rates ranged between 9.5–27.4 g m−2 yr−1 (post–1963 in oligo-mesotrophic deep-lake Lugu) and between 17.4–43.5 g m−2 yr−1 (post–1980 in eutrophic shallow-lake Erhai), respectively. These variations were primarily attributable to the spatial differences in aquatic primary production and terrestrial detritus supply relating to anthropogenic land-use change and phosphorus loading, rather than intra-lake sediment focusing-related transport and redistribution. The single central-core approach from Lugu Lake would overestimate whole-lake OC stock by 32% or underestimate the value by 48%, indicating spatial variability is an important source of uncertainty for OC stock quantification in similar large and/or morphometrically complex waterbodies. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity of OC accumulation in inland waters requires considerable research with well-placed multi-cores to provide a deeper understanding of carbon sequestration patterns and mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Carbon burial, Land use change, Large lakes, Quantitative evaluation, Sediment focusing, Spatial heterogeneity
National Category
Environmental Sciences Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189181 (URN)10.1016/j.catena.2021.105768 (DOI)000708436100014 ()2-s2.0-85116563371 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-12 Created: 2021-11-12 Last updated: 2021-11-12Bibliographically approved
Martínez Cortizas, A., Sjöström, J. K., Ryberg, E. E., Kylander, M. E., Kaal, J., López-Costas, O., . . . Bindler, R. (2021). 9000 years of changes in peat organic matter composition in Store Mosse (Sweden) traced using FTIR-ATR. Boreas, 50, 1161-1178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>9000 years of changes in peat organic matter composition in Store Mosse (Sweden) traced using FTIR-ATR
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2021 (English)In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 50, p. 1161-1178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Store Mosse (the ‘Great Bog’ in Swedish) is one of the most extensive bog complexes in southern Sweden (~77 km2), where pioneering palaeoenvironmental research has been carried out since the early 20th century. This includes, for example, vegetation changes, carbon and nitrogen dynamics, peat decomposition, atmospheric metal pollution, mineral dust deposition, dendrochronology, and tephrochronology. Even though organic matter (OM) represents the bulk of the peat mass and its compositional change has the potential to provide crucial ecological information on bog responses to environmental factors, peat OM molecular composition has not been addressed in detail. Here, a 568-cm-deep peat sequence was studied at high resolution, by attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) in the mid-infrared region (4000–400 cm–1). Principal components analysis was performed on selected absorbances and change-point modelling was applied to the records to determine the timing of changes. Four components accounted for peat composition: (i) depletion/accumulation of labile (i.e. carbohydrates) and recalcitrant (i.e. lignin and other aromatics, aliphatics, organic acids and some N compounds) compounds, due to peat decomposition; (ii) variations in N compounds and carbohydrates; (iii) residual variation of lignin and organic acids; and (iv) residual variation of aliphatic structures. Peat decomposition showed two main patterns: a long-term trend highly correlated to peat age (r = 0.87), and a short-term trend, which showed five main phases of increased decomposition (at ~8.4–8.1, ~7.0–5.6, ~3.5–3.1, ~2.7–2.1 and ~1.6–1.3 ka) – mostly corresponding to drier climate and its effect on bog hydrology. The high peat accumulation event (~5.6–3.9 ka), described in earlier studies, is characterized by the lowest degree of peat decomposition of the whole record. Given that FTIR-ATR is a quick, non-destructive, cost-effective technique, our results indicate that it can be applied in a systematic way (including multicore studies) to peat research and provide relevant information on the evolution of peatlands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183371 (URN)10.1111/bor.12527 (DOI)000647237600001 ()2-s2.0-85105081122 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-24 Created: 2021-05-24 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
King, C., Michelutti, N., Meyer-Jacob, C., Bindler, R., Tapia, P., Grooms, C. & Smol, J. P. (2021). Diatoms and other siliceous indicators track the ontogeny of a “bofedal” (Wetland) ecosystem in the peruvian andes. Botany, 99(8), 491-505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diatoms and other siliceous indicators track the ontogeny of a “bofedal” (Wetland) ecosystem in the peruvian andes
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2021 (English)In: Botany, ISSN 1916-2790, E-ISSN 1916-2804, Vol. 99, no 8, p. 491-505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent warming in the Andes is affecting the region’s water resources including glaciers and lakes, which supply water to tens of millions of people downstream. High-elevation wetlands, known locally as “bofedales”, are an understudied Andean ecosystem despite their key role in carbon sequestration, maintenance of biodiversity, and regulation of water flow. Here, we analyze subfossil diatom assemblages and other siliceous bioindicators preserved in a peat core collected from a bofedal in Peru’s Cordillera Vilcanota. Basal radiocarbon ages show the bofedal likely formed during a wet period of the Little Ice Age (1520–1680 CE), as inferred from nearby ice core data. The subfossil diatom record is marked by several dynamic assemblage shifts documenting a hydrosere succession from an open-water system to mature peatland. The diatoms appear to be responding largely to changes in hydrology that occur within the natural development of the bofedal, but also to pH and possibly nutrient enrichment from grazing animals. The rapid peat accretion recorded post-1950 at this site is consistent with recent peat growth rates elsewhere in the Andes. Given the many threats to Peruvian bofedales including climate change, overgrazing, peat extraction, and mining, these baseline data will be critical to assessing future change in these important ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Science Publishing, 2021
Keywords
Climate change, Cordillera Vilcanota, Cushion bogs, Distichia muscoides Nees & Meyen, High-elevation peat, Tropical Andes, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186793 (URN)10.1139/cjb-2020-0196 (DOI)000681713900003 ()2-s2.0-85112069731 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-23 Created: 2021-08-23 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Capo, E., Giguet-Covex, C., Rouillard, A., Nota, K., Heintzman, P. D., Vuillemin, A., . . . Parducci, L. (2021). Lake sedimentary dna research on past terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity: Overview and recommendations. Quaternary, 4(1), Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake sedimentary dna research on past terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity: Overview and recommendations
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2021 (English)In: Quaternary, E-ISSN 2571-550X, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 6Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of lake sedimentary DNA to track the long-term changes in both terrestrial and aquatic biota is a rapidly advancing field in paleoecological research. Although largely applied nowadays, knowledge gaps remain in this field and there is therefore still research to be conducted to ensure the reliability of the sedimentary DNA signal. Building on the most recent literature and seven original case studies, we synthesize the state-of-the-art analytical procedures for effective sampling, extraction, amplification, quantification and/or generation of DNA inventories from sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) via high-throughput sequencing technologies. We provide recommendations based on current knowledge and best practises.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Biodiversity, Lake sediments, Metabarcoding, Metagenomics, Paleoecology, Paleogenetics, Paleogenomics, Paleolimnology, Sedimentary ancient DNA, Sedimentary DNA
National Category
Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182945 (URN)10.3390/quat4010006 (DOI)000633093700001 ()2-s2.0-85104594727 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-11 Created: 2021-05-11 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Capo, E., Ninnes, S., Domaizon, I., Bigler, C., Wang, X.-R., Bindler, R. & Rydberg, J. (2021). Landscape setting drives the microbial eukaryotic community structure in four Swedish mountain lakes over the holocene. Microorganisms, 9(2), Article ID 355.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Landscape setting drives the microbial eukaryotic community structure in four Swedish mountain lakes over the holocene
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2021 (English)In: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

On the annual and interannual scales, lake microbial communities are known to be heavily influenced by environmental conditions both in the lake and in its terrestrial surroundings. How-ever, the influence of landscape setting and environmental change on shaping these communities over a longer (millennial) timescale is rarely studied. Here, we applied an 18S metabarcoding approach to DNA preserved in Holocene sediment records from two pairs of co‐located Swedish mountain lakes. Our data revealed that the microbial eukaryotic communities were strongly influenced by catchment characteristics rather than location. More precisely, the microbial communities from the two bedrock lakes were largely dominated by unclassified Alveolata, while the peatland lakes showed a more diverse microbial community, with Ciliophora, Chlorophyta and Chytrids among the more predominant groups. Furthermore, for the two bedrock‐dominated lakes—where the oldest DNA samples are dated to only a few hundred years after the lake formation—certain Alveolata, Chlorophytes, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria taxa were found prevalent throughout all the sediment profiles. Our work highlights the importance of species sorting due to landscape setting and the persistence of microbial eukaryotic diversity over millennial timescales in shaping modern lake microbial communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
18S metabarcoding, Holocene, Lakes, Microbial eukaryotes, Sedimentary DNA
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180793 (URN)10.3390/microorganisms9020355 (DOI)000622825300001 ()2-s2.0-85100648541 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-25 Created: 2021-02-25 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
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