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Publications (10 of 82) Show all publications
Schneider, E. B., Edvinsson, S. & Ogasawara, K. (2023). Did smallpox cause stillbirths?: Maternal smallpox infection, vaccination, and stillbirths in Sweden, 1780–1839. Population Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Did smallpox cause stillbirths?: Maternal smallpox infection, vaccination, and stillbirths in Sweden, 1780–1839
2023 (English)In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

While there is strong evidence that maternal smallpox infection can cause foetal loss, it is not clear whether smallpox infections were a demographically important cause of stillbirths historically. In this paper, we use parish-level data from the Swedish Tabellverket data set for 1780–1839 to test the effect of smallpox on stillbirths quantitatively, analysing periods before and after the introduction of vaccination in 1802. We find that smallpox infection was not a major cause of stillbirths before 1820, because most women contracted smallpox as children and were therefore not susceptible during pregnancy. We do find a small, statistically significant effect of smallpox on stillbirths from 1820 to 1839, when waning immunity from vaccination put a greater share of pregnant women at risk of contracting smallpox. However, the reduced prevalence of smallpox in this period limited its impact on stillbirths. Thus, smallpox was not an important driver of historical stillbirth trends.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
foetal death, historical demography, smallpox, stillbirth, vaccination
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205342 (URN)10.1080/00324728.2023.2174266 (DOI)000936415300001 ()2-s2.0-85148497104 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-03 Created: 2023-04-03 Last updated: 2023-04-03
Edvinsson, S., Mandemakers, K. & Smith, K. R. (2023). Introduction: major databases with historical longitudinal population data: development, impact and results. Historical Life Course Studies, 13(4), 186-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: major databases with historical longitudinal population data: development, impact and results
2023 (English)In: Historical Life Course Studies, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 186-190Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the last 60 years several major historical databases with reconstructed life courses of large populations spanning decades have been launched. The development of these databases is indicative of considerable investments that have greatly expanded the possibilities for new research within the fields of history, demography, sociology, as well as other disciplines. In this volume spanning seven articles, eight databases are included that have had a wide impact on research in various disciplines. Each database had its own unique genesis that is well described in the articles assembled in this volume. They inform readers about how these databases have changed the course of research in historical demography and related disciplines, how settled findings were challenged or confirmed, and how innovative investigations were launched and implemented. In the end we explore how research with this kind of databases will develop in future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Institute of Social History, 2023
Keywords
Historical demography, Historical microdata, Life course, Longitudinal research, Record linkage, Social science history
National Category
History Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214530 (URN)10.51964/hlcs14840 (DOI)2-s2.0-85170386439 (Scopus ID)
Note

Special Issue: Major Databases with Historical Longitudinal Population Data: Development, Impact and Results

Available from: 2023-09-25 Created: 2023-09-25 Last updated: 2023-09-25Bibliographically approved
Vikström, P., Larsson, M., Engberg, E. & Edvinsson, S. (2023). The demographic database: history of technical and methodological achievements. Historical Life Course Studies, 13, 89-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The demographic database: history of technical and methodological achievements
2023 (English)In: Historical Life Course Studies, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 13, p. 89-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Demographic Data Base (DDB) at the Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) at Umeå University has since the 1970s been building longitudinal population databases and disseminating data for research. The databases were built to serve as national research infrastructures, useful for addressing an indefinite number of research questions within a broad range of scientific fields, and open to all academic researchers who wanted to use the data. A countless number of customized datasets have been prepared and distributed to researchers in Sweden and abroad and to date, the research has resulted in more than a thousand published scientific reports, books, and articles within a broad range of academic fields. This article will focus on the development of techniques and methods used to store and structure the data at DDB from the beginning in 1973 until today. This includes digitization methods, database design and methods for linkage. The different systems developed for implementing these methods are also described and to some extent, the hardware used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Institute of Social History, 2023
Keywords
Church registers, Database, Digitization, Linkage, RDBMS
National Category
History Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214551 (URN)10.51964/hlcs12163 (DOI)2-s2.0-85170399818 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Vikström, L., Edvinsson, S. & Häggström Lundevaller, E. (2021). Disability, mortality and causes of death in a 19th-century Swedish population. Historical Life Course Studies, 10(S3), 151-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability, mortality and causes of death in a 19th-century Swedish population
2021 (English)In: Historical Life Course Studies, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 10, no S3, p. 151-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our study aims to find how disability affected human health in historical time through an examination of individuals' mortality risks and death causes. Swedish parish registers digitized by the Demographic Data Base (DDB) enable us to account for a relatively high number of persons reported to have disabilities, and to compare them with a group of non-disabled cases. The findings concern a 19th-century population of 35,610 individuals in the Sundsvall region, Sweden, and show that disability increased the premature mortality risk substantially. Disability seems to have jeopardized men’s survival in particular, and perhaps due to gendered expectations concerning the type of work men and women became less able to perform when disabled. Our study of death causes indicates that their deaths were less characterized by infectious diseases than among the non-disabled group, as a possible consequence of lower exposure to infections due to the way in which disability could impede opportunities for interaction with peers in the community. In all, our mortality findings suggest that disability was associated with poor living conditions and limited possibilities to participate in work and social life, which further tend to have accumulated across life and resulted in ill health indicated by premature death.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: International Institute of Social History, 2021
Keywords
Disability, Gender, Death causes, Mortality, Sweden
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183872 (URN)10.51964/hlcs9585 (DOI)2-s2.0-85170371631 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2021-06-02 Created: 2021-06-02 Last updated: 2023-09-20Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S., Häggström Lundevaller, E., Malmberg, G. & Ng, N. (2021). Income inequality in Swedish municipalities 1986-2013: Development and regional patterns. Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Income inequality in Swedish municipalities 1986-2013: Development and regional patterns
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the present report, we investigate the patterns and trends of inequality in disposable income in the working-age population in Swedish municipalities 1986-2013. This period coincided with when Sweden changed from very lowlevels of inequality to one with substantially increasing inequality. Incomes has increased in all parts of Sweden, but differences in incomes between municipalities have widened. Asa result, large parts of Sweden have become poorer in a relative, although not in a nominative sense. At the same time, income inequality has increased substantially within as well as between municipalities. Present-day Swedes live in much more unequal environments, both at the national level and in the municipalities. The large city areas, or at least part of them, have had a much more advantageous economic development, but they also became more unequal. We see a division between parts of Sweden; there are clear differentiation tendencies between urban and rural parts, centre and periphery. Another finding is that the relation between mean income and income inequality has changed from the 1980s to the present. This association was negative a couple of decades ago, meaning that inequality was somewhat higher in poorer municipalities. From the 1990s onwards, the association is instead positive – affluent municipalities are more unequal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå universitet, 2021. p. 20
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2021:21
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Population studies; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189343 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 412-2012-892
Available from: 2021-11-09 Created: 2021-11-09 Last updated: 2021-11-11Bibliographically approved
Diamant, U.-B., Winbo, A., Marcus, K., Edvinsson, S. & Annika, R. (2021). LQTS founder population in Northern Sweden – the natural history of a potentially fatal inherited cardiac disorder. Biodemography and Social Biology, 66(3-4), 191-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LQTS founder population in Northern Sweden – the natural history of a potentially fatal inherited cardiac disorder
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Biodemography and Social Biology, ISSN 1948-5565, E-ISSN 1948-5573, Vol. 66, no 3-4, p. 191-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is an autosomal dominant inherited cardiac disorder associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. In northern Sweden, a LQTS founder mutation (p.Y111C, KCNQ1 gene) was verified by genetic haplotype analysis and genealogical studies, and a common ancestor couple was identified. Clinical studies of this population revealed an apparent mild phenotype. However, due to early commencement of prophylactic treatment, the natural history of this disorder cannot be properly assessed based only on clinical data. By using the family tree mortality ratio method (FTMR), we assessed the natural history of the untreated LQTS founder population. The principle of FTMR is to compare the age-specific mortality rates in a historic population harboring an inherited disorder with the corresponding mortality rates in an unaffected control population.

Initially, we used the general Swedish population during the same period for comparison and observed an apparent increased longevity in the p.Y111C study population. However, when using a control population born in the same area, we observed no differences regarding overall mortality. Moreover, patterns suggesting age- and sex-stratified excess mortality, in accordance with previous LQTS studies, were evident.

This study shows the importance of being aware of historical demographic patterns to avoid misinterpreting when comparing historical data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189842 (URN)10.1080/19485565.2021.1999788 (DOI)000717366500001 ()34761968 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119139494 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20120244
Available from: 2021-11-23 Created: 2021-11-23 Last updated: 2022-10-03Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S. & Engberg, E. (2020). A database for the future major contributions from 47 years of database development and research at the demographic data base. Historical Life Course Studies, 9, 173-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A database for the future major contributions from 47 years of database development and research at the demographic data base
2020 (English)In: Historical Life Course Studies, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 9, p. 173-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Demographic Data Base (DDB) at the Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) at Umeå University has since the 1970s been building longitudinal population databases and disseminating data for research. The databases were built to serve as national research infrastructures, useful for addressing an indefinite number of research questions within a broad range of scientific fields, and open to all academic researchers who wanted to use the data. A countless number of customised datasets have been prepared and distributed to researchers in Sweden and abroad and to date, the research has resulted in more than a thousand published scientific reports, books, and articles within a broad range of academic fields. While there has long been a clear predominance of research within the humanities and social sciences, it has always been used for research in other fields as well, for example medicine. In this article, we first give a brief presentation of the DDB and its history, characteristics, and development from the 1970s to the present. It includes an overview of the research based on the DDB databases, with a focus on the databases POPUM and POPLINK with individual-level data. A number of major traits of the research from 1973 to now have been outlined, showing the breadth of the research and highlighting some major contributions, with a focus on work that would have been very difficult to perform without data from the DDB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Institute of Social History, 2020
Keywords
Demography, Historical databases, History, Life courses, Life sciences, Population studies, Sociology
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214542 (URN)10.51964/hlcs9305 (DOI)2-s2.0-85121127440 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-26 Created: 2023-09-26 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Ng, N., Häggström Lundevaller, E., Malmberg, G. & Edvinsson, S. (2020). Income inequality and old-age mortality in Sweden: do regional development and lagged effect matter?. Health and Place, 64, Article ID 102384.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Income inequality and old-age mortality in Sweden: do regional development and lagged effect matter?
2020 (English)In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 64, article id 102384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We designed a retrospective cohort study for exploring the impact of municipality-level income inequality, based on the Gini 1986, 2004 indices, on all-cause old-age mortality among the older Swedish population during 2005-2009. We controlled for the confounding effects of individual and regional correlates and the lag effects of inequality by using multilevel logistic regression. The effects of income inequality were not consistent across age cohorts and, among the youngest cohorts, were negligible. This study reiterates that individual-level economics rather than the immediate or lagged effects of income inequality matter more for old-age mortality, even after controlling for individual and regional factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Income inequality, Gini index, Old-age mortality, Lagged effects, Regional effects, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174851 (URN)10.1016/j.healthplace.2020.102384 (DOI)000562023700017 ()32838898 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85088320985 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-18 Created: 2020-09-18 Last updated: 2023-04-26Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S. & Broström, G. (2020). Is high social class always beneficial for survival?: a study of northern Sweden 1801-2013. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is high social class always beneficial for survival?: a study of northern Sweden 1801-2013
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Focusing on two regions in northern Sweden 1801–2013, we challenge common notions of the assumed advantage in survival of belonging to a high social class. The issue is analysed according to gender and age group (adults and elderly) and in relation to the development of economic inequality. The results show that high social class is not always favourable for survival. Men in the elite category, particularly in working age, had higher mortality compared to others during a large part of the studied period; a male mortality class reversal appears at a surprisingly late date, while the social gradient among women conforms to the expected pattern. We suggest that health-related behaviour is decisive not only in later but earlier phases of the mortality transition as well. The results implicate that the association between social class and health is more complex than is assumed in many of the dominant theories in demography and epidemiology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2020. p. 33
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2020:2
Keywords
Class reversal in mortality; Gender differences; Inverse probability weighting; Mortality transition; Restricted mean survival time.
National Category
History
Research subject
Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174805 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-892
Available from: 2020-09-08 Created: 2020-09-08 Last updated: 2020-09-21Bibliographically approved
Broström, G., Edvinsson, S., Dribe, M. & Eriksson, B. (2019). Social class and sex-specific adult mortality during 200 years in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at The Annual Meeting of the Social Science and History Association, Chicago, November 21-24, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social class and sex-specific adult mortality during 200 years in Sweden
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent regional studies on adult mortality and socio-economic status inSweden are merged and also completed with analyses from country-widecensuses in strategic time periods, with the purpose to find out whetherthe locally drawn conclusions about a changing social gradient in mortalitystill holds.The answer is firmly positive: While the upper classes have definiteadvantage in modern time (after, say, the 1960s), the reverse situationholds during the nineteenth and early twentieth century for men. Women, onthe other hand, seem to follow the expected pattern of a positive socialgradient through the last 200 years.

Keywords
Adult mortality; Gender differences; Social gradient; Survival analysis
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-172625 (URN)
Conference
The Annual Meeting of the Social Science and History Association, Chicago, November 21-24, 2019
Available from: 2020-06-22 Created: 2020-06-22 Last updated: 2024-07-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7439-002x

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