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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Antonsson, H., Björk, S., Rezai, E., Sehlstedt, C. & Molin, J. (2024). Monitoring persons’ rights to equal care: registered nurses’ experiences of caring for people with mental ill-health and somatic comorbidity in psychiatric outpatient care. Issues in Mental Health Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring persons’ rights to equal care: registered nurses’ experiences of caring for people with mental ill-health and somatic comorbidity in psychiatric outpatient care
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2024 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Persons with severe mental ill-health die early from preventable physical ill-health. Registered nurses in psychiatric outpatient care play a key role in improving persons’ physical health, and it is important to examine how they view their responsibility, their experiences of care, and the obstacles they meet in providing person-centred care. The purpose of this study was to explore registered nurses’ experiences of caring for persons with mental ill-health and somatic comorbidity in psychiatric outpatient care, using qualitative content analysis to analyze data from semi-structured interviews. The results show that these nurses monitored the person’s right to equal care, embraced the whole of the persons suffering, and dealt with unclear boundaries in care. This highlights the unique role that registered nurses play in psychiatric outpatient care via their ability to interpret symptoms and find ways to adapt care based on persons’ needs. Registered nurses consider physical health in all care and provide a link between psychiatric and somatic care. Together with mental health nurses at primary health care centers, they are key in reducing persons’ suffering. There is a need for structural and functional changes in line with person-centred care including collaboration both within and outside healthcare organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223952 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2024.2335915 (DOI)001207020800001 ()2-s2.0-85191177023 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-03 Created: 2024-05-03 Last updated: 2024-05-03
Ekbäck, E., Rådmark, L., Molin, J., Strömbäck, M., Midgley, N. & Henje, E. (2024). The Power Threat Meaning Framework: a qualitative study of depression in adolescents and young adults. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 15, Article ID 1393066.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Power Threat Meaning Framework: a qualitative study of depression in adolescents and young adults
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2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 15, article id 1393066Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Depression constitutes one of our largest global health concerns and current treatment strategies lack convincing evidence of effectiveness in youth. We suggest that this is partly due to inherent limitations of the present diagnostic paradigm that may group fundamentally different conditions together without sufficient consideration of etiology, developmental aspects, or context. Alternatives that complement the diagnostic system are available yet understudied. The Power Threat and Meaning Framework (PTMF) is one option, developed for explanatory and practical purposes. While based on scientific evidence, empirical research on the framework itself is still lacking. This qualitative study was performed to explore the experiences of adolescents and young adults with depression from the perspective of the PTMF.

Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 11 Swedish individuals aged 15– 22 years, mainly female, currently enrolled in a clinical trial for major depressive disorder. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with framework analysis informed by the PTMF.

Results: A complex multitude of adversities preceding the onset of depression was described, with a rich variety of effects, interpretations, and reactions. In total, 17 themes were identified in the four dimensions of the PTMF, highlighting the explanatory power of the framework in this context. Not all participants were able to formulate coherent narratives.

Discussion: The PTMF provides a framework for understanding the complexities, common themes, and lived experiences of young individuals with depression. This may be essential for the development of new interventions with increased precision and effectiveness in the young.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2024
Keywords
depression, adolescents, young adults, qualitative research, framework analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-224332 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2024.1393066 (DOI)
Available from: 2024-05-14 Created: 2024-05-14 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Molin, J., Isaksson Jonsson, L. & Antonsson, H. (2023). From traditional counselling to health‐promoting conversations? Registered nurses' experiences of providing health counselling to people living with severe mental ill‐health in supported housing. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 32(3), 875-883
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From traditional counselling to health‐promoting conversations? Registered nurses' experiences of providing health counselling to people living with severe mental ill‐health in supported housing
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 875-883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People with severe mental ill-health have lower life expectancies than the rest ofthe population, partly due to unhealthy lifestyles. Counselling to help these people improve their health can also be complex, and registered nurses are key to its success.The aim of this study was to elucidate registered nurses' experiences of providing health counselling to people living with severe mental ill-health in supported housing. We conducted eight individual semi-structured interviews with registered nurses working in this context and subjected the responses to qualitative content analysis. The results show that registered nurses who counsel people with severe mental ill-health feel dispirited, but they defend their often fruitless endeavours and strive, through health counselling, to help these people meet healthier lifestyle goals. Shifting the focus from traditional health counselling to person-centred care using health-promoting conversations could strengthen registered nurses in their efforts towards improving lifestyles among people living with severe mental ill-healthin supported housing. Therefore, to facilitate healthier lifestyles among this population, we recommend that community healthcare support registered nurses working in supported housing by educating them in the use of health-promoting conversations, including teach-back techniques.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
counselling, experience, health promotion, lifestyle, mental ill-health, registered nurse
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205772 (URN)10.1111/inm.13133 (DOI)000942417200001 ()36861747 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150221109 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-17 Created: 2023-03-17 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Antonsson, H., Dahliavy, L., Mouline, H. & Molin, J. (2023). Struggling with unnecessary suffering: registered nurses' experiences of delayed decisions on treatment without consent in forensic psychiatric inpatient care. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 32(6), 1681-1690
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Struggling with unnecessary suffering: registered nurses' experiences of delayed decisions on treatment without consent in forensic psychiatric inpatient care
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1681-1690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chemical restraints are used in forensic psychiatric inpatient care, however with caution as it can feel like an assault against patients' integrity. When waiting for decisions on treatment without consent, nursing staff are expected to care for patients with severe mental ill-health without the use of medical treatment, often with a feeling of already having tried all other available means. Knowledge about how registered nurses experience such situations is sparse but could contribute to the development of both teamwork and nursing approaches that could mean reduced suffering for patients. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses' experiences of delayed decisions on treatment without consent in forensic psychiatric inpatient care. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with registered nurses working in forensic psychiatric units in Sweden. Data were analysed through qualitative content analysis. The result showed that experiences of treatment without consent were about striving to protect patients from harm, striving for collaboration during difficult circumstances and striving to do good. This was interpreted as a struggle with unnecessary suffering. For registered nurses to be able to handle such challenging situations and relieve suffering for patients, experience and master-level education in mental health nursing are highlighted. Another aspect that is highlighted is the importance of having consultants familiar with the circumstances at the unit. A method for joint reflection is suggested, to promote an open-minded work culture with a well-functioning decision-making process and ensure that both consultants and nursing staff have support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
chemical restraints, coercive measures, experience, forensic care, mental health nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212514 (URN)10.1111/inm.13194 (DOI)001031030400001 ()37458217 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165289406 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-31 Created: 2023-07-31 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, B.-M., Wikander, T., Neyra Marklund, I. & Molin, J. (2022). A Necessary Pain: A Literature Review of Young People’s Experiences of Self-Harm. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 43(2), 154-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Necessary Pain: A Literature Review of Young People’s Experiences of Self-Harm
2022 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 154-163Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Self-harm is defined as intentional self-injury without the wish to die. People who self-harm report feeling poorly treated by healthcare professionals, and nurses wish to know how best to respond to and care for them. Increased understanding of the meaning of self-harm can help nurses collaborate with young people who self-harm to achieve positive healthcare outcomes for them.

Aim: This review aimed to synthesise qualitative research on young peoples' experiences of living with self-harm.

Method: A literature search in CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO resulted in the inclusion of 10 qualitative articles that were subjected to metasynthesis.

Results: The results show that young people’s experiences of living with self-harm are multifaceted and felt to be a necessary pain. They used self-harm to make life manageable, reporting it provided relief, security, and a way to control overwhelming feelings. They suffered from feeling addicted to self-harm and from shame, guilt, and self-punishment. They felt alienated, lonely, and judged by people around them, from whom they tried to hide their real feelings. Instead of words, they used their wounds and scars as a cry for help.

Conclusion: Young people who harm themselves view self-harm as a necessary pain; they suffer, but rarely get the help they need. Further research is necessary to learn how to offer these people the help they need.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2022
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186601 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2021.1948640 (DOI)000681245400001 ()34346267 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85111844078 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-13 Created: 2021-08-13 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Derblom, K., Molin, J., Gabrielsson, S. & Lindgren, B.-M. (2022). Nursing staff’s experiences of caring for people with mental ill-health in general emergency departments: a qualitative descriptive study. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 43(12), 1145-1154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing staff’s experiences of caring for people with mental ill-health in general emergency departments: a qualitative descriptive study
2022 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 1145-1154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While people with mental ill-health report unsatisfying experiences and poor treatment in general emergency departments, nursing staff report a lack of adequate knowledge and training. This study describes nursing staff’s experiences caring for people with mental ill-health in general emergency departments. A qualitative descriptive design was used and 14 interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results show that nursing staff are dealing with uncertainty and competing priorities when caring for people with mental ill-health. Nursing staff must both take and be given the opportunity to maintain and develop confidence and independence and need support in promoting mental health recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201346 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2022.2138653 (DOI)000884664100001 ()36383445 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142289900 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2023-01-11Bibliographically approved
Molin, J. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2022). Participation, Confirmation and Challenges: How Nursing Staff Experience the Daily Conversations Nursing Intervention in Psychiatric Inpatient Care. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 43(11), 1056-1063
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation, Confirmation and Challenges: How Nursing Staff Experience the Daily Conversations Nursing Intervention in Psychiatric Inpatient Care
2022 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 1056-1063Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental health nursing focuses on patients' experiences, accessed through narratives developed in conversations with nursing staff. This study explored nursing staff's experiences of using the nursing intervention Daily Conversations in psychiatric inpatient care. We used a qualitative questionnaire and received 103 responses. Qualitative content analysis of the data resulted in three themes describing both advantages and obstacles with Daily Conversations: Promotes participation, Contributes to confirming relations and Challenges previous structures. To illuminate the significance of confirming acts and make nursing staff more comfortable, the intervention could benefit from being more flexible and allowing in its structure. For the intervention to succeed, nursing staff need training in conversation, thorough preparation, shared reflections on values in mental health nursing, and structures to maintain its implementation and use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199684 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2022.2116135 (DOI)000849529000001 ()36053790 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137665095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-26 Created: 2022-09-26 Last updated: 2022-12-30Bibliographically approved
Gabrielsson, S., Engström, Å., Lindgren, B.-M., Molin, J. & Gustafsson, S. (2022). Self-rated reflective capacity in post-registration specialist nursing education students. Reflective Practice, 23(5), 539-551
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated reflective capacity in post-registration specialist nursing education students
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2022 (English)In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 539-551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to describe self-rated reflective capacity in students enrolled in post-registration specialist nursing education at the advanced level. We applied a non-experimental and cross-sectional design. A survey of 156 specialist nursing students at two universities in Northern Sweden was conducted. Data were collected in 2019 using a web-based questionnaire assessing self-rated reflective capacity through the Reflective Capacity Scale of the Reflective Practice Questionnaire. Data were analyzed descriptively using frequencies and proportions. Correlations were analyzed using Spearman’s rho. Results show that students specializing in psychiatric care and oncological care report a higher reflective capacity than students specializing in other areas. We found no significant correlations between reflective capacity and gender, and reflective capacity in total did not correlate with age or work experience. We conclude that reflective capacity might vary between nursing students in different areas of specialization. Further research is needed to understand causes and impacts of variations in nursing students’ reflective capacities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2022
Keywords
nurse education, reflective capacity, Reflective practice
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197794 (URN)10.1080/14623943.2022.2071245 (DOI)000790131000001 ()2-s2.0-85132672716 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-07-05 Created: 2022-07-05 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ekbäck, E., von Knorring, J., Löfgren Burström, A., Hunhammar, D., Dennhag, I., Molin, J. & Henje Blom, E. (2022). Training for Awareness, Resilience and Action (TARA) for medical students: a single-arm mixed methods feasibility study to evaluate TARA as an indicated intervention to prevent mental disorders and stress-related symptoms. BMC Medical Education, 22(1), Article ID 132.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Training for Awareness, Resilience and Action (TARA) for medical students: a single-arm mixed methods feasibility study to evaluate TARA as an indicated intervention to prevent mental disorders and stress-related symptoms
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2022 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Medical students have a higher risk for depression, anxiety, stress-related symptoms, burnout, and suicide, and more rarely seek professional help or treatment than the general population. Appeals are being made to address the mental health and resilience of physicians-to-be. The novel program Training for Awareness, Resilience, and Action (TARA) was originally developed to treat depressed adolescents, targeting specific neuroscientific findings in this population. TARA has shown feasibility and preliminary efficacy in clinically depressed adolescents and corresponding brain-changes in mixed community adolescent samples. The present study investigated the feasibility and acceptability of TARA as a potential indicated prevention program for symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress and burnout in Swedish medical students.

Methods: We conducted a single-arm trial with 23 self-selected students in their early semesters of medical school (mean age 25.38 years, 5 males and 18 females), with or without mental disorders. All participants received TARA. Self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, perceived stress and psychological inflexibility were collected before (T0) and after the intervention (T1). Qualitative data on the participants’ experiences of TARA were collected in focus-group interviews conducted halfway through the program and upon completion of the program. Individual interviews were also conducted 2 years later. Qualitative content analysis was performed.

Results: The mean attendance rate was 61.22% and the dropout rate was 17.40%. The Child Session Rating Scale administered after every session reflected an overall acceptable content, mean total score 34.99 out of 40.00. Trends towards improvement were seen across all outcome measures, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety (t = 1.13, p = 0.29) and Depression (t = 1.71, p = 0.11) subscales, Perceived Stress Scale (t = 0.67, p = 0.51) and Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for youth (t = 1.64, p = 0.10). None of the participants deteriorated markedly during the intervention. Qualitative content analysis resulted in a main theme labeled: “An uncommon meeting-ground for personal empowerment”, with 4 themes; “Acknowledging unmet needs”, “Entering a free zone”, “Feeling connected to oneself and others” and “Expanding self-efficacy”.

Conclusion: TARA is feasible and acceptable in a mixed sample of Swedish medical students. The students’ reports of entering an uncommon meeting-ground for personal empowerment supports effectiveness studies of TARA in this context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Medical students, Mental health, Psychological stress, Qualitative research
National Category
Psychiatry Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193011 (URN)10.1186/s12909-022-03122-2 (DOI)000762282000001 ()35227281 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125536398 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region VästerbottenRegion VästernorrlandThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2022-03-10 Created: 2022-03-10 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Molin, J., Öberg-Nordin, M., Arvidsson, B. & Lindgren, B.-M. (2021). A personal and professional journey: experiences of being trained online to be a supervisor in professional supervision in nursing. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 16(1), Article ID 1952523.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A personal and professional journey: experiences of being trained online to be a supervisor in professional supervision in nursing
2021 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 1952523Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nurses often work alone in complex environments with ambiguous responsibilities and need ensured access to supervision. Online supervision has become common and has potential to support supervision in rural areas.

Aim: To explore the experiences of registered nurses (RNs) learning online to be a supervisor in professional supervision in nursing.

Design: A longitudinal qualitative design was used.

Methods: A total of six focus group discussions, with 15 RNs divided in two groups, were conducted before, during, and after the training. Data underwent qualitative content analysis.

Results: Results showed that the participants experienced learning to be a supervisor online as a personal and professional journey, and learning online was an advantage rather than a disadvantage. Initially, they focused on themselves, then on themselves within the group, and finally on themselves and the group. Both the group and the internet environment were described as safe places. Online tutoring needs to include the creation of a social presence within the group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Education, experiences, leadership, longitudinal, online, process-oriented group supervision in nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187469 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2021.1952523 (DOI)000673068900001 ()34254902 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85109919797 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-13 Created: 2021-09-13 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9116-5569

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