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Mannapperuma, ChanakaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1589-9138
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Nagahage, I. ., Matsuda, K., Miyashita, K., Fujiwara, S., Mannapperuma, C., Yamada, T., . . . Yamaguchi, M. (2023). NAC domain transcription factors VNI2 and ATAF2 form protein complexes and regulate leaf senescence. Plant Direct, 7(9), Article ID e529.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NAC domain transcription factors VNI2 and ATAF2 form protein complexes and regulate leaf senescence
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2023 (English)In: Plant Direct, E-ISSN 2475-4455, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC2 (NAC) domain transcription factor VND-INTERACTING2 (VNI2) negatively regulates xylem vessel formation by interacting with another NAC domain transcription factor, VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7), a master regulator of xylem vessel formation. Here, we screened interacting proteins with VNI2 using yeast two-hybrid assay and isolated two NAC domain transcription factors, Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIVATION FACTOR 2 (ATAF2) and NAC DOMAIN CONTAINING PROTEIN 102 (ANAC102). A transient gene expression assay showed that ATAF2 upregulates the expression of genes involved in leaf senescence, and VNI2 effectively inhibits the transcriptional activation activity of ATAF2. vni2 mutants accelerate leaf senescence, whereas ataf2 mutants delay leaf senescence. In addition, the accelerated leaf senescence phenotype of the vni2 mutant is recovered by simultaneous mutation of ATAF2. Our findings strongly suggest that VNI2 interacts with and inhibits ATAF2, resulting in negatively regulating leaf senescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, leaf senescence, NAC domain protein, protein–protein interaction, transcription factor
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214775 (URN)10.1002/pld3.529 (DOI)37731912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171678868 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-03 Created: 2023-10-03 Last updated: 2023-10-03Bibliographically approved
Curci, P. L., Zhang, J., Mähler, N., Seyfferth, C., Mannapperuma, C., Diels, T., . . . Vandepoele, K. (2022). Identification of growth regulators using cross-species network analysis in plants. Plant Physiology, 190(4), 2350-2365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of growth regulators using cross-species network analysis in plants
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2022 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 190, no 4, p. 2350-2365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the need to increase plant productivity, one of the challenges plant scientists are facing is to identify genes that play a role in beneficial plant traits. Moreover, even when such genes are found, it is generally not trivial to transfer this knowledge about gene function across species to identify functional orthologs. Here, we focused on the leaf to study plant growth. First, we built leaf growth transcriptional networks in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), maize (Zea mays), and aspen (Populus tremula). Next, known growth regulators, here defined as genes that when mutated or ectopically expressed alter plant growth, together with cross-species conserved networks, were used as guides to predict novel Arabidopsis growth regulators. Using an in-depth literature screening, 34 out of 100 top predicted growth regulators were confirmed to affect leaf phenotype when mutated or overexpressed and thus represent novel potential growth regulators. Globally, these growth regulators were involved in cell cycle, plant defense responses, gibberellin, auxin, and brassinosteroid signaling. Phenotypic characterization of loss-of-function lines confirmed two predicted growth regulators to be involved in leaf growth (NPF6.4 and LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY2). In conclusion, the presented network approach offers an integrative cross-species strategy to identify genes involved in plant growth and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
National Category
Botany Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201619 (URN)10.1093/plphys/kiac374 (DOI)000844537500001 ()35984294 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143141934 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, 287465
Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2022-12-14Bibliographically approved
Liu, H., Yan, X.-M., Wang, X.-R., Zhang, D.-X., Zhou, Q., Shi, T.-L., . . . Mao, J.-F. (2021). Centromere-Specific Retrotransposons and Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in the Genome of Yellowhorn (Xanthoceras sorbifolium, Sapindaceae), an Oil-Producing Tree With Significant Drought Resistance. Frontiers in Plant Science, 12, Article ID 766389.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Centromere-Specific Retrotransposons and Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in the Genome of Yellowhorn (Xanthoceras sorbifolium, Sapindaceae), an Oil-Producing Tree With Significant Drought Resistance
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 12, article id 766389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In-depth genome characterization is still lacking for most of biofuel crops, especially for centromeres, which play a fundamental role during nuclear division and in the maintenance of genome stability. This study applied long-read sequencing technologies to assemble a highly contiguous genome for yellowhorn (Xanthoceras sorbifolium), an oil-producing tree, and conducted extensive comparative analyses to understand centromere structure and evolution, and fatty acid biosynthesis. We produced a reference-level genome of yellowhorn, ∼470 Mb in length with ∼95% of contigs anchored onto 15 chromosomes. Genome annotation identified 22,049 protein-coding genes and 65.7% of the genome sequence as repetitive elements. Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) account for ∼30% of the yellowhorn genome, which is maintained by a moderate birth rate and a low removal rate. We identified the centromeric regions on each chromosome and found enrichment of centromere-specific retrotransposons of LINE1 and Gypsy in these regions, which have evolved recently (∼0.7 MYA). We compared the genomes of three cultivars and found frequent inversions. We analyzed the transcriptomes from different tissues and identified the candidate genes involved in very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis and their expression profiles. Collinear block analysis showed that yellowhorn shared the gamma (γ) hexaploidy event with Vitis vinifera but did not undergo any further whole-genome duplication. This study provides excellent genomic resources for understanding centromere structure and evolution and for functional studies in this important oil-producing plant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
Keywords
centromere, Gypsy, LINE1, very-long-chain fatty acid, yellowhorn
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190416 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2021.766389 (DOI)000726943000001 ()34880890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85120747893 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Christie, N., Mannapperuma, C., Ployet, R., van der Merwe, K., Mähler, N., Delhomme, N., . . . Myburg, A. A. (2021). qtlXplorer: an online systems genetics browser in the Eucalyptus Genome Integrative Explorer (EucGenIE). BMC Bioinformatics, 22(1), Article ID 595.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>qtlXplorer: an online systems genetics browser in the Eucalyptus Genome Integrative Explorer (EucGenIE)
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2021 (English)In: BMC Bioinformatics, E-ISSN 1471-2105, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Affordable high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing technologies are allowing genomic analysis of plant and animal populations and as a result empowering new systems genetics approaches to study complex traits. The availability of intuitive tools to browse and analyze the resulting large-scale genetic and genomic datasets remain a significant challenge. Furthermore, these integrative genomics approaches require innovative methods to dissect the flow and interconnectedness of biological information underlying complex trait variation. The Plant Genome Integrative Explorer (PlantGenIE.org) is a multi-species database and domain that houses online tools for model and woody plant species including Eucalyptus. Since the Eucalyptus Genome Integrative Explorer (EucGenIE) is integrated within PlantGenIE, it shares genome and expression analysis tools previously implemented within the various subdomains (ConGenIE, PopGenIE and AtGenIE). Despite the success in setting up integrative genomics databases, online tools for systems genetics modelling and high-resolution dissection of complex trait variation in plant populations have been lacking.

Results: We have developed qtlXplorer (https://eucgenie.org/QTLXplorer) for visualizing and exploring systems genetics data from genome-wide association studies including quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and expression-based QTL (eQTL) associations. This module allows users to, for example, find co-located QTLs and eQTLs using an interactive version of Circos, or explore underlying genes using JBrowse. It provides users with a means to build systems genetics models and generate hypotheses from large-scale population genomics data. We also substantially upgraded the EucGenIE resource and show how it enables users to combine genomics and systems genetics approaches to discover candidate genes involved in biotic stress responses and wood formation by focusing on two multigene families, laccases and peroxidases.

Conclusions: qtlXplorer adds a new dimension, population genomics, to the EucGenIE and PlantGenIE environment. The resource will be of interest to researchers and molecular breeders working in Eucalyptus and other woody plant species. It provides an example of how systems genetics data can be integrated with functional genetics data to provide biological insight and formulate hypotheses. Importantly, integration within PlantGenIE enables novel comparative genomics analyses to be performed from population-scale data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Co-expression, Database, eQTL, Eucalyptus, EucGenIE, Genome browser, Online resource, qtlXplorer, Systems genetics, ‘Omics integration
National Category
Genetics Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190864 (URN)10.1186/s12859-021-04514-9 (DOI)000730565000001 ()34911434 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121369417 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-29 Created: 2021-12-29 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Shen, D., Holmer, R., Kulikova, O., Mannapperuma, C., Street, N., Yan, Z., . . . Magne, K. (2021). The BOP-type co-transcriptional regulator NODULE ROOT1 promotes stem secondary growth of the tropical Cannabaceae tree Parasponia andersonii. The Plant Journal, 106(5), 1366-1386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The BOP-type co-transcriptional regulator NODULE ROOT1 promotes stem secondary growth of the tropical Cannabaceae tree Parasponia andersonii
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2021 (English)In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 106, no 5, p. 1366-1386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tree stems undergo a massive secondary growth in which secondary xylem and phloem tissues arise from the vascular cambium. Vascular cambium activity is driven by endogenous developmental signalling cues and environmental stimuli. Current knowledge regarding the genetic regulation of cambium activity and secondary growth is still far from complete. The tropical Cannabaceae tree Parasponia andersonii is a non-legume research model of nitrogen-fixing root nodulation. Parasponia andersonii can be transformed efficiently, making it amenable for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated reverse genetics. We considered whether P. andersonii also could be used as a complementary research system to investigate tree-related traits, including secondary growth. We established a developmental map of stem secondary growth in P. andersonii plantlets. Subsequently, we showed that the expression of the co-transcriptional regulator PanNODULE ROOT1 (PanNOOT1) is essential for controlling this process. PanNOOT1 is orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (AtBOP1) and AtBOP2, which are involved in the meristem-to-organ-boundary maintenance. Moreover, in species forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules, NOOT1 is known to function as a key nodule identity gene. Parasponia andersonii CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function Pannoot1 mutants are altered in the development of the xylem and phloem tissues without apparent disturbance of the cambium organization and size. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the expression of key secondary growth-related genes is significantly down-regulated in Pannoot1 mutants. This allows us to conclude that PanNOOT1 positively contributes to the regulation of stem secondary growth. Our work also demonstrates that P. andersonii can serve as a tree research system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
development, NOOT-BOP-COCH-LIKE genes, NOOT1, Parasponia andersonii, secondary growth, tree, vascular cambium
National Category
Botany Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182375 (URN)10.1111/tpj.15242 (DOI)000637431300001 ()33735477 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85103646410 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-04-26 Created: 2021-04-26 Last updated: 2022-01-12Bibliographically approved
Yang, F.-S., Nie, S., Liu, H., Shi, T.-L., Tian, X.-C., Zhou, S.-S., . . . Mao, J.-F. (2020). Chromosome-level genome assembly of a parent species of widely cultivated azaleas. Nature Communications, 11(1), Article ID 5269.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chromosome-level genome assembly of a parent species of widely cultivated azaleas
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2020 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 5269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Azaleas (Ericaceae) comprise one of the most diverse ornamental plants, renowned for their cultural and economic importance. We present a chromosome-scale genome assembly for Rhododendron simsii, the primary ancestor of azalea cultivars. Genome analyses unveil the remnants of an ancient whole-genome duplication preceding the radiation of most Ericaceae, likely contributing to the genomic architecture of flowering time. Small-scale gene duplications contribute to the expansion of gene families involved in azalea pigment biosynthesis. We reconstruct entire metabolic pathways for anthocyanins and carotenoids and their potential regulatory networks by detailed analysis of time-ordered gene co-expression networks. MYB, bHLH, and WD40 transcription factors may collectively regulate anthocyanin accumulation in R. simsii, particularly at the initial stages of flower coloration, and with WRKY transcription factors controlling progressive flower coloring at later stages. This work provides a cornerstone for understanding the underlying genetics governing flower timing and coloration and could accelerate selective breeding in azalea. Azaleas are one of the most diverse ornamental plants and have cultural and economic importance. Here, the authors report a chromosome-scale genome assembly for the primary ancestor of the azalea cultivar Rhododendro simsi and identify transcription factors that may function in flower coloration at different stages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2020
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-176910 (URN)10.1038/s41467-020-18771-4 (DOI)000585918500004 ()33077749 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85092780912 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-20 Created: 2020-11-20 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Kumar, V., Donev, E. N., Barbut, F. R., Kushwah, S., Mannapperuma, C., Urbancsok, J. & Mellerowicz, E. J. (2020). Genome-Wide Identification of Populus Malectin/Malectin-Like Domain-Containing Proteins and Expression Analyses Reveal Novel Candidates for Signaling and Regulation of Wood Development. Frontiers in Plant Science, 11, 1-20, Article ID 588846.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-Wide Identification of Populus Malectin/Malectin-Like Domain-Containing Proteins and Expression Analyses Reveal Novel Candidates for Signaling and Regulation of Wood Development
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2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 11, p. 1-20, article id 588846Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Malectin domain (MD) is a ligand-binding protein motif of pro- and eukaryotes. It is particularly abundant in Viridiplantae, where it occurs as either a single (MD, PF11721) or tandemly duplicated domain (PF12819) called malectin-like domain (MLD). In herbaceous plants, MD- or MLD-containing proteins (MD proteins) are known to regulate development, reproduction, and resistance to various stresses. However, their functions in woody plants have not yet been studied. To unravel their potential role in wood development, we carried out genome-wide identification of MD proteins in the model tree species black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), and analyzed their expression and co-expression networks. P. trichocarpa had 146 MD genes assigned to 14 different clades, two of which were specific to the genus Populus. 87% of these genes were located on chromosomes, the rest being associated with scaffolds. Based on their protein domain organization, and in agreement with the exon-intron structures, the MD genes identified here could be classified into five superclades having the following domains: leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-MD-protein kinase (PK), MLD-LRR-PK, MLD-PK (CrRLK1L), MLD-LRR, and MD-Kinesin. Whereas the majority of MD genes were highly expressed in leaves, particularly under stress conditions, eighteen showed a peak of expression during secondary wall formation in the xylem and their co-expression networks suggested signaling functions in cell wall integrity, pathogen-associated molecular patterns, calcium, ROS, and hormone pathways. Thus, P. trichocarpa MD genes having different domain organizations comprise many genes with putative foliar defense functions, some of which could be specific to Populus and related species, as well as genes with potential involvement in signaling pathways in other tissues including developing wood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2020
Keywords
Populus, cell wall integrity, malectin domain, malectin-like domain, CBM57, receptor-like protein kinases, CrRLK1L
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-179510 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2020.588846 (DOI)000604609900001 ()33414796 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85098982279 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-05 Created: 2021-02-05 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mannapperuma, C. (2020). Human-computer interaction principles for developing web-based genomics resources. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå Universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human-computer interaction principles for developing web-based genomics resources
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Mänskliga-datorinteraktion principer för utveckling av webb-baserade resurser för genomik
Abstract [en]

Genomics projects, including genome sequencing, transcriptomics, genome-wide association mapping and epigenetics assays, producevast quantities of data. Extracting the required information from such complex datasets is a significant challenge and even where software tools do exist, these are often not intuitive or designed fornon-specialist users. This dissertation details how I have applied design principles from the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to the development of intuitive bioinformatics web-based resources for exploring genomics data. In the first part of the thesis I detail the development of a specialised genomics resource that enables non specialists who lack bioinformatics skills to access, explore and extract new knowledge from a variety of genomics data types. These tools were developed in collaboration with wet lab biologists and bioinformaticians who represent typical end-users. The tools developed have been integrated within the PlantGenIE (Plant Genome IntegrativeExplorer) web resource, which has been established as a platform for exploring genomics data for Populus, conifer, Eucalyptus and Arabidopsisgenomics data. Even though the ability to collect, store and manage data is increasing faster due to new technologies and science, our ability to understand it remains constant. To help address this, in the second part of this dissertation I focus on the usability enhancement of tools based on the HCI and User Experience (UX) practices. To achieve this, I utilised visualisation techniques and design principles in the design process for the improvement of the PlantGenIEUser Interface (UI), and applied usability methods to evaluate the UX of PlantGenIE tools. These results were then used to inform adaptations and fine-tuning of those. I show that utilisation of these research methods and practices with the development life cycle represents a framework for designing usable bioinformatics tools. Wider-scale use of these methods by future designers and developers will enable the creation of more usable bioinformatics resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Universitet, 2020. p. 62
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Genetics Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170109 (URN)978-91-7855-284-9 (ISBN)978-91-7855-285-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2020-06-11, Stora hörsalen (KB3B1), KBC-huset, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-05-20 Created: 2020-04-27 Last updated: 2020-05-25Bibliographically approved
Mähler, N., Schiffthaler, B., Robinson, K. M., Terebieniec, B. K., Vucak, M., Mannapperuma, C., . . . Street, N. R. (2020). Leaf shape in Populus tremula is a complex, omnigenic trait. Ecology and Evolution, 10(21), 11922-11940
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaf shape in Populus tremula is a complex, omnigenic trait
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2020 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 10, no 21, p. 11922-11940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Leaf shape is a defining feature of how we recognize and classify plant species. Although there is extensive variation in leaf shape within many species, few studies have disentangled the underlying genetic architecture. We characterized the genetic architecture of leaf shape variation in Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula L.) by performing genome‐wide association study (GWAS) for physiognomy traits. To ascertain the roles of identified GWAS candidate genes within the leaf development transcriptional program, we generated RNA‐Seq data that we used to perform gene co‐expression network analyses from a developmental series, which is publicly available within the PlantGenIE resource. We additionally used existing gene expression measurements across the population to analyze GWAS candidate genes in the context of a population‐wide co‐expression network and to identify genes that were differentially expressed between groups of individuals with contrasting leaf shapes. These data were integrated with expression GWAS (eQTL) results to define a set of candidate genes associated with leaf shape variation. Our results identified no clear adaptive link to leaf shape variation and indicate that leaf shape traits are genetically complex, likely determined by numerous small‐effect variations in gene expression. Genes associated with shape variation were peripheral within the population‐wide co‐expression network, were not highly connected within the leaf development co‐expression network, and exhibited signatures of relaxed selection. As such, our results are consistent with the omnigenic model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
complex trait, GWAS, leaf shape, natural variation, omnigenic, Populus tremula
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170641 (URN)10.1002/ece3.6691 (DOI)000578291300001 ()2-s2.0-85092478395 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2020-05-12 Created: 2020-05-12 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mannapperuma, C., Liu, H., Bel, M., Delhomme, N., Serrano, A., Schiffthaler, B., . . . Street, N. (2020). PlantGenIE-PLAZA: integrating orthology into the PlantGenIE.org resource using the PLAZA pipeline.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PlantGenIE-PLAZA: integrating orthology into the PlantGenIE.org resource using the PLAZA pipeline
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2020 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170114 (URN)
Available from: 2020-04-27 Created: 2020-04-27 Last updated: 2022-03-09
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1589-9138

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