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Redström, Johan, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0976-670X
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Özçetin, S. & Redström, J. (2024). Rethinking 'Terms of Service' through programmatic time travel. In: C. Gray; P. Hekkert; L. Forlano; P. Ciuccarelli (Ed.), DRS2024: Research papers. Paper presented at DRS 2024, Boston, USA, June 23-28, 2024. Design Research Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rethinking 'Terms of Service' through programmatic time travel
2024 (English)In: DRS2024: Research papers / [ed] C. Gray; P. Hekkert; L. Forlano; P. Ciuccarelli, Design Research Society , 2024Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The contexts of design are constantly changing, sometimes to the extent that once a ‘good’ designerly response to an issue, over time becomes increasingly problematic. Therefore, there is often a need to rethink design and its concepts. Programmatic design research may provide an exploratory space for inquiry through specific examples in relation to certain theoretical and conceptual framings. In this paper, we explore [dis/re]orientations towards design histories for creating alternative programmatic research spaces. We work through an everyday challenge, ‘Terms of Service’ (ToS), a regulatory mechanism amplifying power asymmetries in relating to data-intensive things. Disorienting design by making an odd association between today’s ToS and the ‘ornament’ in early industrial design, we explore resulting reorientations to rethink designing in this domain. Finally, we outline how [dis/re]orientations could be considered a speculative method for making a kind of ‘Programmatic Time Travel’, using reflections of pasts to reimagine designing for just futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Design Research Society, 2024
Series
DRS Biennial Conference Series
Keywords
terms of service, [dis/re]orientations, programmatic research, design histories, just futures
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-226411 (URN)10.21606/drs.2024.838 (DOI)
Conference
DRS 2024, Boston, USA, June 23-28, 2024
Projects
Designing alternatives for the Terms of Service
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 955990
Available from: 2024-06-17 Created: 2024-06-17 Last updated: 2024-06-18Bibliographically approved
Giaccardi, E., Redström, J. & Nicenboim, I. (2024). The making(s) of more-than-human design: introduction to the special issue on more-than-human design and HCI. Human-Computer Interaction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The making(s) of more-than-human design: introduction to the special issue on more-than-human design and HCI
2024 (English)In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Human activities have drastically altered the planet, with design playing a significant role. While design may intend to do good, its consequences are not always positive: from climate change to resource depletion to unforeseen social dynamics. These transformations also include ourselves, as our relationships with new technologies blur and complicate previous human and machine agency distinctions. Increasingly, design has become a matter of defining what it means to be human. This special issue explores the proposition that conventional human-centered design approaches may not adequately address the complex challenges we face, and that there is instead a need to ground design in more-than-human perspectives. This introduction outlines the evolving landscape of more-than-human design in the context of HCI. Articulating a series of emerging research trajectories, we aim to illuminate the transformative potential of more-than-human orientations to design, including how they both extend and depart from familiar lines of inquiry in HCI–for example, how designers are redefining data, interfaces, and responsibility, and reshaping posthuman knowledge through design. Ultimately, this special issue aims to explore new pathways for designing in the era of the more-than-human, challenging the perceived divide between practice and theory to imagine alternative futures for HCI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
design practices, design theory, HCI, more-than-human design, posthumanism
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-225345 (URN)10.1080/07370024.2024.2353357 (DOI)2-s2.0-85193991437 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 955990
Available from: 2024-05-31 Created: 2024-05-31 Last updated: 2024-05-31
Collins, R., Redström, J. & Rozendaal, M. (2024). The right to contestation: Towards repairing our interactions with algorithmic decision systems. International Journal of Design, 18(1), 95-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The right to contestation: Towards repairing our interactions with algorithmic decision systems
2024 (English)In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 95-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper looks at how contestation in the context of algorithmic decision systems is essentially the progeny of repair for our more decentralised and abstracted digital world. The act of repair has often been a way for users to contest with bad design, substandard products, and disappointing outcomes - not to mention often being a necessary aspect of ensuring effective use over time. As algorithmic systems continue to make more decisions about our lives and futures, we need to look for new ways to contest their outcomes and repair potentially broken systems. Through looking at examples of contemporary repair and contestation and tracing the history of electronics repair from discrete components into the decentralised systems of today, we look at how the shared values of repair and contestation helps surface ways to approach contestation using tactics of the Right to Repair movement and the instincts of the Fixer. Finally, we speculate on roles, communities and a move towards an agonistic interaction space where response-ability rests more equally across user, designer and system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chinese Institute of Design, 2024
Keywords
AI, Design for Repair, Design for Contestation, Right to Repair, Agonistic Design, Algorithmic Decision Systems
National Category
Design Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design; human-computer interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223357 (URN)10.57698/v18i1.06 (DOI)2-s2.0-85193252896 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DCODE
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 955990
Available from: 2024-04-15 Created: 2024-04-15 Last updated: 2024-06-04Bibliographically approved
Nicenboim, I., Venkat, S., Rustad, N. L., Vardanyan, D., Giaccardi, E. & Redström, J. (2023). Conversation starters: how can we misunderstand AI better?. In: Albrecht Schmidt (Ed.), CHI EA'23: Extended abstracts of the 2023 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems. Paper presented at 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2023, Hamburg, Germany, April 23-28, 2023. ACM Digital Library, Article ID 431.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conversation starters: how can we misunderstand AI better?
Show others...
2023 (English)In: CHI EA'23: Extended abstracts of the 2023 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems / [ed] Albrecht Schmidt, ACM Digital Library, 2023, article id 431Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Conversation Starters is a series of interactive prototypes that probe how to design explainable interactions with AI in everyday life. Taking a more-than-human approach, we explore how 'failures' could be transformed into opportunities for situated understandings of AI. We describe the process of designing fictional artifacts and scenarios about conversational agents that can grow at home. While overall the project suggests that misunderstandings could help people develop sensitivities for knowing when to trust AI systems, the metaphor of 'growing an AI' (which positions training as a matter of care), highlights that practices of sharing and experimenting could be valuable starting points for designing explainable and trustworthy interactions with of AI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2023
Keywords
Artificial Intelligence, Conversational Agents, Conversational User Interfaces, Explainability of AI, More-than-human Design
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-208954 (URN)10.1145/3544549.3583914 (DOI)2-s2.0-85158116693 (Scopus ID)9781450394222 (ISBN)
Conference
2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2023, Hamburg, Germany, April 23-28, 2023
Available from: 2023-06-01 Created: 2023-06-01 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Nicenboim, I., Elisa, G. & Redström, J. (2023). Designing more-than-human AI: experiments on situated conversations and silences. diid disegno industriale industrial design (80), 32-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing more-than-human AI: experiments on situated conversations and silences
2023 (English)In: diid disegno industriale industrial design, ISSN 1594-8528, no 80, p. 32-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Every interaction with an AI-powered device invokes a vast planetary network. Operating on temporal and geographical scales that go beyond humans, Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems pose various societal and environmental challenges. These challenges encompass issues such as the extraction of both human and nonhuman resources and knowledge, and the reproduction of inequalities. To tackle these concerns, scholars in Design and Human-Computer-Interaction emphasize the urgency for designers to cultivate non-anthropocentric approaches. In the pursuit of establishing a non-anthropocentric design practice for AI, this paper adopts a more-than-human orientation in the design of conversational agents (CAs). We start by presenting a series of design experiments, including workshops, videos and performances, that shed light on the anthropocentric biases ingrained in CA interactions. These experiments unveil how CAs are designed to recognize and address only specific human voices and concerns. Building upon these insights, we introduce two outcomes that chart an alternative path – the first involves a collection of interactive prototypes for CAs that are capable of listening and responding to more-than-human “voices” while the second entails a tool to support designers in noticing more-than-human entanglements, in the form of a podcast. We conclude by reflecting on how the knowledge gained from our design inquiry can illuminate future design practices and contribute to AI research as a whole.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bologna University Press, 2023
Keywords
More-Than-Human design, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Research Through Design, Conversational Agents
National Category
Design
Research subject
design; industrial design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218049 (URN)10.30682/diid8023c (DOI)
Available from: 2023-12-14 Created: 2023-12-14 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
Hauser, S., Redström, J. & Wiltse, H. (2023). The widening rift between aesthetics and ethics in the design of computational things. AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, 38, 227-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The widening rift between aesthetics and ethics in the design of computational things
2023 (English)In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 38, p. 227-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the face of massively increased technological complexity, it is striking that so many of today’s computational and net- worked things follow design ideals honed decades ago in a much different context. These strong ideals prescribe a presenta- tion of things as useful tools through design and a withdrawal of aspects of their functionality and complexity. Beginning in the mid-twentieth century, we trace this ‘withdrawal program’ as it has persisted in the face of increasing computational complexity. Currently, design is in a dilemma where computational products can be seen as brilliantly designed and engag- ing to use yet can also be considered very problematic in how they support hidden agendas and often seem less than trust- worthy. In this article, we analyse factors shaping this emergent ethical dilemma and reveal the concept of a widening rift between what computational things actually are and do and the ways in which they are presented as things for use. Against this backdrop, we argue that there is a need for a new orientation in design programs to adequately address this deepening rupture between the aesthetics and ethics in the design of computational things. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2023
Keywords
Artificial Intelligence, Human-Computer Interaction, Philosophy, ethics, aesthetics, industrial design, interaction design, design theory
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188341 (URN)10.1007/s00146-021-01279-w (DOI)000698535100001 ()2-s2.0-85115645264 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2021-10-06 Created: 2021-10-06 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Giaccardi, E., Speed, C., Redström, J., Ben Allouch, S., Shklovski, I. & Smith, R. C. (2022). Editorial: AI and the conditions of design: towards a new set of design ideals. In: Dan Lockton; Sara Lenzi; Paul Hekkert; Arlene Oak; Juan Sádaba; Peter Lloyd (Ed.), DRS 2022: Bilbao: Editorials. Paper presented at Design Research Society Conference, hybrid via Bilbao, Spain, June 25 - July 3, 2022. , Article ID 27.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: AI and the conditions of design: towards a new set of design ideals
Show others...
2022 (English)In: DRS 2022: Bilbao: Editorials / [ed] Dan Lockton; Sara Lenzi; Paul Hekkert; Arlene Oak; Juan Sádaba; Peter Lloyd, 2022, article id 27Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The five papers in the DRS 2022 track “AI and the Conditions of Design: Towards A New Set of Design Ideals” offer radical lenses to change the narrative around AI and open pathways towards pluralist digital futures, signaling redirections for experimenting with more inclusive and imaginative design practices.

Series
Proceedings of DRS, ISSN 2398-3132
Keywords
artificial intelligence, explainability, queerness, imaginaries, currencies
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201035 (URN)10.21606/drs.2022.1078 (DOI)
Conference
Design Research Society Conference, hybrid via Bilbao, Spain, June 25 - July 3, 2022
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2017.0058
Available from: 2022-11-15 Created: 2022-11-15 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Nicenboim, I., Giaccardi, E. & Redström, J. (2022). From explanations to shared understandings of AI. In: Dan Lockton; Sara Lenzi; Paul Hekkert; Arlene Oak; Juan Sádaba; Peter Lloyd (Ed.), DRS 2022: Bilbao: Research papers. Paper presented at Design Research Society Conference, hybrid via Bilbao, Spain, June 25 - July 3, 2022. , Article ID 293.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From explanations to shared understandings of AI
2022 (English)In: DRS 2022: Bilbao: Research papers / [ed] Dan Lockton; Sara Lenzi; Paul Hekkert; Arlene Oak; Juan Sádaba; Peter Lloyd, 2022, article id 293Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A key challenge in the design of AI systems is how to support people in understanding them. We address this challenge by positioning explanations in everyday life, within ongoing relations between people and artificial agents. By reorienting explainability through more-than-human design, we call for a new approach that considers both people and artificial agents as active participants in constructing understandings. To articulate such an approach, we first review the assumptions underpinning the premise of explaining AI. We then conceptualize a shift from explanations to shared understandings, which we characterize as situated, dynamic, and performative. We conclude by proposing two design strategies to support shared understandings, i.e. looking across AI and exposing AI failures. We argue that these strategies can help designers reveal the hidden complexity of AI (e.g., positionality and infrastructures), and thus support people in understanding agents' capabilities and limitations in the context of their own lives.

Series
Proceedings of DRS, ISSN 2398-3132
Keywords
Explainability, artificial intelligence, everyday life, more-than-human design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201034 (URN)10.21606/drs.2022.773 (DOI)978-1-91229-457-2 (ISBN)
Conference
Design Research Society Conference, hybrid via Bilbao, Spain, June 25 - July 3, 2022
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2017.0058
Available from: 2022-11-15 Created: 2022-11-15 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Collins, R. & Redström, J. (2022). The contestation café: a manifesto for contestation: prototyping an agonistic place. In: Proceedings of the 12th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI’22): Participative Computing for Sustainable Futures. Paper presented at NordiCHI '22: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, 8-12 October, 2022.. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 3547290.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The contestation café: a manifesto for contestation: prototyping an agonistic place
2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the 12th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI’22): Participative Computing for Sustainable Futures, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, article id 3547290Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Contestation Manifesto and its associated paraphernalia are artefacts from a speculative, near-future community action known as the Contestation Café. Being one in a series of research through design projects on contestation, the Contestation Café is a critical, yet also practical, design intervention rooted in how the act of repair has moved through the physical into the digital, and the shared values therein. Tracing the history of electronic repair - from the early valve radios, the invention of the transistor, microchips, programmable devices and through to IoT, connected devices and the "fluid assemblages"that emerge - we can see the shared values of the physical act of repair with the more intangible act of contestation in the digital world of algorithmic systems. Overlaying the values and tactics of the Right to Repair movement with the emerging concerns around data-driven systems we find ourselves examining the Repair Café as a potential model for community contestation and the construction of publics. The Repair Café started in Amsterdam in 2009 and has since spread to 35 countries with over 1700 instances of these cafés. The Repair Café is not intended to be a place where you bring your broken appliances for someone else to repair - rather, it is a place where you learn how to repair and recycle your own products and devices, and - more importantly - a place where you simply learn that things can be fixed rather than thrown out. In a similar spirit, the Contestation Café would be a place for those who feel mistreated by automated decision systems, AIs and algorithms, to bring their broken interactions and their unfair decisions to learn how to contest, push back and reclaim their agency and autonomy. Rather than Repairers, the Contestation Café has a panel of Fixers - people who inhabit the space between designers and users, with a particular knowledge of these systems and how to map and navigate them - who are there to share their experience and knowledge, and to guide the user in the ways of contestation and to become Fixers of their own futures. Although the Contestation Café is a speculative concept based on research into the shared values of contestation and repair, it has developed a life of its own through the process of imagining how it would work and what it would look like. Through the act of writing a manifesto for contestation, the space has manifested itself in the present and is waiting only for the fixers and public to arrive. Plans are already in progress for its first real instance and all of the imagined artefacts presented here will inform this process. https://contestationcafe.org/

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022
Series
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Keywords
adversarial, AI, algorithms, automation, community, contestability, critical, design, machine learning, maintenance, publics, repair, speculative, systems
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200879 (URN)10.1145/3546155.3547290 (DOI)2-s2.0-85140929704 (Scopus ID)9781450396998 (ISBN)
Conference
NordiCHI '22: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, 8-12 October, 2022.
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2022-11-15 Created: 2022-11-15 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. & Redström, J. (2021). Philosophical Imaginaries for Connected Sociotechnical Realities. In: SPT 2021 - Techological Imaginaries: The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference - June 28-30 2021. Paper presented at The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference, June 28-30, 2021, Virtual Conference (pp. 405-405). The Society for Philosophy and Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philosophical Imaginaries for Connected Sociotechnical Realities
2021 (English)In: SPT 2021 - Techological Imaginaries: The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference - June 28-30 2021, The Society for Philosophy and Technology , 2021, p. 405-405Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is now well-recognized that technologies do not stand on their own and only serve rational, instrumental purposes, but are rather part of complex sociotechnical systems that reflect diverse and complex values, purposes, and power structures. They can also be seen as having their own existence independent of humans, drawing on flat ontology and materialist perspectives. Yet in common sense reasoning around technology, not to mention in its (experience) design, there persists a basic technological imaginary based on technologies as passive tools that humans pick up and put to use in serving their more or less heroic purposes. Now, however, even everyday experience seems to challenge this perspective on technology as strictly submissive tools as we find that what music to listen to next, books to read, movies to watch or products to purchase seem to have been all but already selected for us by the apps and services we use. Indeed, 'becoming part of' is probably a more accurate description than 'using'. 

In order to explore the implications of these changes while also highlighting persistent elements of our collective technological imaginary, we here examine a few classic examples within philosophy of technology through this lens. Playfully reimagining examples such as the hammer, the cane or the clock, what happens if we instead start from the assumption that things possess agencies and intentionalities as important or influential as our own? What if we consider ourselves extensions of the tools we use, rather than the other way around? Here, we aim to sketch the contours of a new kind of philosophical imaginary that might be more relevant for our current sociotechnical reality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Society for Philosophy and Technology, 2021
Keywords
design, digital, philosophy of technology, philosophical imaginaries
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186627 (URN)
Conference
The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference, June 28-30, 2021, Virtual Conference
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2021-08-16 Created: 2021-08-16 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0976-670X

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