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Malmberg Gavelin, HannaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3256-9018
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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Barbera, M., Lehtisalo, J., Perera, D., Aspö, M., Cross, M., De Jager Loots, C. A., . . . Kivipelto, M. (2024). A multimodal precision-prevention approach combining lifestyle intervention with metformin repurposing to prevent cognitive impairment and disability: the MET-FINGER randomised controlled trial protocol. Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, 16(1), Article ID 23.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multimodal precision-prevention approach combining lifestyle intervention with metformin repurposing to prevent cognitive impairment and disability: the MET-FINGER randomised controlled trial protocol
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2024 (English)In: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, E-ISSN 1758-9193, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Combining multimodal lifestyle interventions and disease-modifying drugs (novel or repurposed) could provide novel precision approaches to prevent cognitive impairment. Metformin is a promising candidate in view of the well-established link between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's Disease and emerging evidence of its potential neuro-protective effects (e.g. vascular, metabolic, anti-senescence). MET-FINGER aims to test a FINGER 2.0 multimodal intervention, combining an updated FINGER multidomain lifestyle intervention with metformin, where appropriate, in an APOE ε4-enriched population of older adults (60–79 years) at increased risk of dementia.

Methods: MET-FINGER is an international randomised, controlled, parallel-group, phase-IIb proof-of-concept clinical trial, where metformin is included through a trial-within-trial design. 600 participants will be recruited at three sites (UK, Finland, Sweden). Participants at increased risk of dementia based on vascular risk factors and cognitive screening, will be first randomised to the FINGER 2.0 intervention (lifestyle + metformin if eligible; active arm) or to receive regular health advice (control arm). Participants allocated to the FINGER 2.0 intervention group at risk indicators of T2D will be additionally randomised to receive metformin (2000 mg/day or 1000 mg/day) or placebo. The study duration is 2 years. The changes in global cognition (primary outcome, using a Neuropsychological Test Battery), memory, executive function, and processing speed cognitive domains; functional status; lifestyle, vascular, metabolic, and other dementia-related risk factors (secondary outcomes), will be compared between the FINGER 2.0 intervention and the control arm. The feasibility, potential interaction (between-groups differences in healthy lifestyle changes), and disease-modifying effects of the lifestyle-metformin combination will be exploratory outcomes. The lifestyle intervention is adapted from the original FINGER trial (diet, physical activity, cognitive training, monitoring of cardiovascular/metabolic risk factors, social interaction) to be consistently delivered in three countries. Metformin is administered as Glucophage®XR/SR 500, (500 mg oral tablets). The metformin/placebo treatment will be double blinded.

Conclusion: MET-FINGER is the first trial combining a multimodal lifestyle intervention with a putative repurposed disease-modifying drug for cognitive impairment prevention. Although preliminary, its findings will provide crucial information for innovative precision prevention strategies and form the basis for a larger phase-III trial design and future research in this field.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT05109169).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Alzheimer's, APOE, Cognitive impairment, Dementia prevention, Drug repurposing, Lifestyle intervention, Lifestyle-drug combination therapy, Metformin, World-Wide FINGERS
National Category
Neurology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220751 (URN)10.1186/s13195-023-01355-x (DOI)001154328500002 ()38297399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183664343 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Karolinska InstituteAlzheimerfondenRegion StockholmEU, European Research Council, 804371EU, Horizon 2020Swedish Research CouncilStiftelsen Stockholms SjukhemForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Swedish Brain FoundationAcademy of FinlandNIH (National Institutes of Health), K24AG045334
Available from: 2024-02-12 Created: 2024-02-12 Last updated: 2024-02-12Bibliographically approved
Bäcklund, C., Eriksson Sörman, D., Malmberg Gavelin, H., Király, O., Demetrovics, Z. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2024). Comparing psychopathological symptoms, life satisfaction, and personality traits between the WHO and APA frameworks of gaming disorder symptoms: a psychometric investigation. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing psychopathological symptoms, life satisfaction, and personality traits between the WHO and APA frameworks of gaming disorder symptoms: a psychometric investigation
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2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The inclusion of Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) in the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) by the American Psychiatric Association and Gaming Disorder in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) by the World Health Organization requires consistent psychological measures for reliable estimates. The current study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the Gaming Disorder Test (GDT), the Ten-Item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10), and the Five-Item Gaming Disorder Test (GDT-5) and to compare the WHO and the APA frameworks of gaming disorder symptoms in terms of psychopathological symptoms, life satisfaction, and personality traits.

Methods: A sample of 723 Swedish gamers was recruited (29.8% women, 68.3% men, 1.9% other, Mage = 29.50 years, SD = 8.91).

Results: The results indicated notable differences regarding the estimated possible risk groups between the two frameworks. However, the association between gaming disorder symptoms and personality traits, life satisfaction, and psychopathological symptoms appeared consistent across the two frameworks. The results showed excellent psychometric properties in support of the one-factor model of the GDT, IGDT-10, and GDT-5, including good reliability estimates (McDonald's omega) and evidence of construct validity. Additionally, the results demonstrated full gender and age measurement invariance of the GDT, IGDT-10, and GDT-5, indicating that gaming disorder symptoms are measured equally across the subgroups.

Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that the IGDT-10, GDT-5, and GDT are appropriate measures for assessing gaming disorder symptoms and facilitating future research in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
assessment, Gaming disorder, internet gaming disorder, item response theory, measurement invariance
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222581 (URN)10.1111/sjop.13010 (DOI)001183589300001 ()38475668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85187468250 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2021–02361Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020–01111
Available from: 2024-04-08 Created: 2024-04-08 Last updated: 2024-04-25
Elbe, P., Bäcklund, C., Vega-Mendoza, M., Sörman, D., Malmberg Gavelin, H., Nyberg, L. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2023). Computerized cognitive interventions for adults with ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Neuropsychology, 37(5), 519-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized cognitive interventions for adults with ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2023 (English)In: Neuropsychology, ISSN 0894-4105, E-ISSN 1931-1559, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 519-530Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Treatments for adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are understudied, compared to children and adolescents with the same condition. In this systematic review and random-effects meta-analysis, we aim to evaluate the outcomes of computerized cognitive training (CCT) interventions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including adults with ADHD.

Method: Cognitive outcomes and ADHD symptom severity were analyzed separately. In addition, the Cattell–Horn–Carroll (CHC) theory of cognitive abilities was used to categorize outcome variables into subdomains, which were analyzed separately in a subsequent analysis.

Results: The results revealed a small positive change in overall cognitive functioning, a measure of all cognitive outcomes in each study, for individuals who took part in CCT compared to controls (k = 9, Hedge’s g = 0.235, 95% CI [0.002, 0.467], p = 0.048, τ2 = 0.000, I2 = 0.000). However, neither symptom severity nor specific cognitive outcomes (executive functioning, cognitive speed, or working memory) showed a significant improvement.

Conclusions: We analyzed the risk of bias in the chosen studies and discuss the findings in terms of effect size. It is concluded that CCT has a small positive effect in adults with ADHD. Due to the lack of heterogeneity in intervention designs across the included studies, increased heterogeneity in future studies could help inform clinicians about the aspects of CCT, such as training type and length, that are most beneficial for this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2023
Keywords
attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, computerized cognitive training, meta-analysis, systematic review, executive functions
National Category
Neurosciences Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-206344 (URN)10.1037/neu0000890 (DOI)000946153700001 ()36892894 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150836585 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Vinnova, 2021-02361
Available from: 2023-04-27 Created: 2023-04-27 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
M. Gavelin, H., Stigsdotter Neely, A., Aronsson, I., Josefsson, M. & Andersson, L. (2023). Mental fatigue, cognitive performance and autonomic response following sustained mental activity in clinical burnout. Biological Psychology, 183, Article ID 108661.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental fatigue, cognitive performance and autonomic response following sustained mental activity in clinical burnout
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2023 (English)In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, Vol. 183, article id 108661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the effects of sustained mental activity on perceptions of mental fatigue, cognitive performance, and autonomic response in patients with clinical burnout as compared to a healthy control group.

Methods: Patients with clinical burnout (n = 30) and healthy control participants (n = 30) completed a 3-hour test session, in which they were administered a set of cognitive tests before and after an effortful cognitive task with concurrent sound exposure. Perceptions of mental fatigue and task demands (mental effort and concentration difficulties) were assessed repeatedly over the course of the test session. Heart rate variability was recorded to index autonomic response.

Results: In comparison with controls, perceived mental fatigue increased earlier in the session for the clinical burnout group and did not recover following a short rest period. Throughout the session, patients rated the tasks as more demanding and showed less improvement on measures of attention and processing speed, inhibition and working memory. While autonomic responses were initially comparable, there was a unique decrease in high-frequency heart rate variability in the clinical burnout group after extended testing and exposure.

Conclusion: Patients with clinical burnout are affected differently than healthy controls by sustained mental activity, as reflected by ratings of perceived mental fatigue, aspects of cognitive performance and autonomic response. Further investigation into the role of autonomic regulation in relation to cognitive symptoms in clinical burnout is warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Burnout, Cognition, Exhaustion disorder, Heart rate variability, Mental fatigue
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214032 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsycho.2023.108661 (DOI)001067177400001 ()37598882 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168840567 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01111
Available from: 2023-09-07 Created: 2023-09-07 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Nelson, A., Malmberg Gavelin, H., Andersson, M., Josefsson, M., Eskilsson, T., Slunga-Järvholm, L., . . . Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2023). Subjective cognitive complaints and its associations to response inhibition and neural activation in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder. Stress, 26(1), Article ID 2188092.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective cognitive complaints and its associations to response inhibition and neural activation in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder
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2023 (English)In: Stress, ISSN 1025-3890, E-ISSN 1607-8888, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 2188092Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stress-related exhaustion is associated with cognitive deficits, measured subjectively using questionnaires targeting everyday slips and failures or more objectively as performance on cognitive tests. Yet, only weak associations between subjective and objective cognitive measures in this group has been presented, theorized to reflect recruitment of compensational resources during cognitive testing. This explorative study investigated how subjectively reported symptoms of cognitive functioning and burnout levels relate to performance as well as neural activation during a response inhibition task. To this end, 56 patients diagnosed with stress-related exhaustion disorder (ED; ICD-10 code F43.8A) completed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a Flanker paradigm. In order to investigate associations between neural activity and subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) and burnout, respectively, scores on the Prospective and retrospective memory questionnaire (PRMQ) and the Shirom-Melamed burnout questionnaire (SMBQ) were added as covariates of interest to a general linear model at the whole-brain level. In agreement with previous research, the results showed that SCCs and burnout levels were largely unrelated to task performance. Moreover, we did not see any correlations between these self-report measures and altered neural activity in frontal brain regions. Instead, we observed an association between the PRMQ and increased neural activity in an occipitally situated cluster. We propose that this finding may reflect compensational processes at the level of basic visual attention which may go unnoticed in cognitive testing but are reflected in the experience of deficits in everyday cognitive functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Neurosciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205760 (URN)10.1080/10253890.2023.2188092 (DOI)000953639900001 ()36883330 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150665693 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0772Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01111)Region VästerbottenAFA InsuranceRiksbankens JubileumsfondThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2023-03-17 Created: 2023-03-17 Last updated: 2023-04-28Bibliographically approved
Sabates, J., Chiu, W.-H., Loi, S., Lampit, A., M. Gavelin, H., Chong, T., . . . Bahar-Fuchs, A. (2023). The associations between neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognition in people with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Neuropsychology Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The associations between neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognition in people with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2023 (English)In: Neuropsychology Review, ISSN 1040-7308, E-ISSN 1573-6660Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Most people with dementia experience neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), including anxiety, depression or disinhibition. There is growing interest in the relationship between NPS and cognitive impairment, but data is still limited. This study aimed to investigate the specific associations between NPS and cognition in people with dementia. MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO were searched for published, peer-reviewed studies of associations between at least one NPS and one cognitive ability in people with dementia. The quality of the studies was assessed with the NIH National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s quality assessment tools. A meta-analysis was conducted using Robumeta package for R. Ninety studies were included. We found significant associations between NPS, global cognition and cognitive domains, e.g. apathy was associated with global cognitive and memory impairment; dysphoria was associated with worse attention; delusions with executive dysfunction. Increased NPS in people with dementia are associated with worse cognitive performance. There were few studies looking at associations between some neuropsychiatric clusters and cognitive abilities, and there was little research on causal relationships. Our review was limited by the inclusion of studies that reported associations in specific formats, and most included people with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, given the large number of studies, this is unlikely to have biased results. More research is needed that includes diverse people with different dementia syndromes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Cognition, Dementia, Neuropsychiatric symptoms
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212510 (URN)10.1007/s11065-023-09608-0 (DOI)001032098600001 ()37477839 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165301057 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-31 Created: 2023-07-31 Last updated: 2023-12-20
M. Gavelin, H., Domellöf, M. E., Åström, E., Nelson, A., Launder, N. H., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Lampit, A. (2022). Cognitive function in clinical burnout: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Work & Stress, 36(1), 86-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive function in clinical burnout: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2022 (English)In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 86-104Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical burnout has been associated with impaired cognitive functioning; however, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the pattern and magnitude of cognitive deficits. The aim of this systematic review and multivariate meta-analysis was to assess cognitive function in clinical burnout as compared to healthy controls and identify the pattern and severity of cognitive dysfunction across cognitive domains. We identified 17 studies encompassing 730 patients with clinical burnout and 649 healthy controls. Clinical burnout was associated with impaired performance in episodic memory (g = −0.36, 95% CI −0.57 to −0.15), short-term and working memory (g = −0.36, 95% CI −0.52 to −0.20), executive function (g = −0.39, 95% CI −0.55 to −0.23), attention and processing speed (g = −0.43, 95% CI −0.57 to −0.29) and fluency (g = −0.53, 95% CI −1.04 to −0.03). There were no differences between patients and controls in crystallized (k = 6 studies) and visuospatial abilities (k = 4). Our findings suggest that clinical burnout is associated with cognitive impairment across multiple cognitive domains. Cognitive dysfunction needs to be considered in the clinical and occupational health management of burnout to optimise rehabilitation and support return-to-work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Burnout, cognition, meta-analysis, systematic review
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190615 (URN)10.1080/02678373.2021.2002972 (DOI)000725944400001 ()2-s2.0-85120985253 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01111
Available from: 2021-12-20 Created: 2021-12-20 Last updated: 2022-07-07Bibliographically approved
M. Gavelin, H., Domellöf, M. E., Leung, I., Neely, A. S., Launder, N. H., Nategh, L., . . . Lampit, A. (2022). Computerized cognitive training in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Ageing Research Reviews, 80, Article ID 101671.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized cognitive training in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis
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2022 (English)In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 80, article id 101671Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive impairment is a central non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD), and there are no established treatments. Computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a safe and efficacious strategy but its efficacy in PD is unclear. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of CCT on cognitive, psychosocial and daily function, and assess potential effect moderators in people with PD without dementia. Randomized controlled trials of CCT were included in multivariate meta-analyses and meta-regressions. Seventeen studies (16 trials) encompassing 679 participants were included. The pooled effect of CCT relative to control was small and statistically significant for overall cognitive function (g=0.16; 95% CI 0.02–0.29). There was robust evidence for benefit on clinical measures of global cognition across 10 trials (g=0.33; 95% CI 0.19–0.48), especially in PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), as well as on individual cognitive domains. Greater CCT dose and PD-MCI population were associated with larger effect sizes, but no statistically significant differences were found between subgroups. There was no significant difference in the efficacy of home-based compared to supervised training. Our findings suggest that CCT is associated with cognitive benefits in PD, including when delivered remotely. Larger, well-powered trials are warranted to examine what specific CCT regimens are most likely to promote cognitive and everyday functioning in the long-term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Cognitive training, Meta-analysis, Parkinson's disease, Systematic review
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-198218 (URN)10.1016/j.arr.2022.101671 (DOI)000841188700002 ()35714854 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85133739803 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014–01654Swedish Research Council, 2017–02371
Available from: 2022-07-22 Created: 2022-07-22 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Lampit, A., Launder, N. H., Minkov, R., Rollini, A., Davey, C. G., Finke, C., . . . Malmberg Gavelin, H. (2022). Computerized cognitive training in people with depression: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. Systematic Reviews, 11(1), Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized cognitive training in people with depression: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2022 (English)In: Systematic Reviews, E-ISSN 2046-4053, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: People with depression often present with concurrent cognitive impairment. Computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a safe and efficacious strategy to maintain or enhance cognitive performance in a range of clinical populations. However, its efficacy in people with depression and how it varies across populations and design factors are currently unclear.

Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from inception to 13 July 2021 for randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy of CCT vs any control condition on cognitive, mood, psychiatric symptoms, psychosocial, and daily functioning in adults with depression. Eligible samples include studies specifically targeting people with major depressive disorder as well as those with other diagnoses where at least 50% of the sample meets the clinical criteria for depression, with the exception of major psychiatric disorders or dementia. The primary outcome is change in the overall cognitive performance. Multivariate analyses will be used to examine the effect sizes on each outcome category as well as possible effect modifiers and correlations between categories. The risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool version 2.

Discussion: To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first systematic review and meta-analysis of narrowly defined CCT across clinical populations with depression. We aim to investigate not only whether CCT is efficacious for cognition, but also how such effects vary across design factors, what other clinically relevant outcomes might respond to CCT, and the extent to which they differ across populations.

Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42020204209

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Computerised cognitive training, Depression, Major depressive disorder, Meta-analysis
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191392 (URN)10.1186/s13643-021-01872-6 (DOI)000739965800001 ()34991698 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122402531 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-17 Created: 2022-01-17 Last updated: 2022-01-17Bibliographically approved
Bäcklund, C., Elbe, P., Gavelin, H. M., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2022). Gaming motivations and gaming disorder symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 11(3), 667-688
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaming motivations and gaming disorder symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 667-688Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize the available literature on the relationship between gaming motivations and gaming disorder symptoms. Specifically, to (1) explore what gaming motivation questionnaires and classifications are used in studies on gaming disorder symptoms and (2) investigate the relationship between motivational factors and symptoms of gaming disorder.

Method: An electronic database search was conducted via EBSCO (MEDLINE and PsycINFO) and the Web of Science Core Collection. All studies using validated measurements on gaming disorder symptoms and gaming motivations and available correlation coefficients of the relationship between gaming disorder and gaming motivations were included. The meta-analyses were conducted using a random-effects model.

Results: In total, 49 studies (k = 58 independent sub-samples), including 51,440 participants, out of which 46 studies (k = 55 sub-samples, n = 49,192 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis. The synthesis identified fourteen different gaming motivation instruments, seven unique motivation models, and 26 motivational factors. The meta-analysis showed statistically significant associations between gaming disorder symptoms and 23 out of 26 motivational factors, with the majority of the pooled mean effect sizes ranging from small to moderate. Moreover, large heterogeneity was observed, and the calculated prediction intervals indicated substantial variation in effects across populations and settings. Motivations related to emotional escape were robustly associated with gaming disorder symptoms.

Discussion and conclusions: The present meta-analysis reinforces the importance of motivational factors in understanding problematic gaming behavior. The analysis showed significant heterogeneity in most outcomes, warranting further investigation.

Registration detail: PROSPERO (CRD42020220050).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Akademiai Kiado, 2022
Keywords
addiction, gaming disorder, meta-analysis, motivation, problematic gaming, systematic review
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200548 (URN)10.1556/2006.2022.00053 (DOI)000864860900004 ()36094861 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139853140 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2021-02361Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2021-0103Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01111
Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3256-9018

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