Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Thomassen, J. A. K., Lundholm, E. & Malmberg, G. (2024). Who stays in their birthplace? The role of multigenerational local ties in young adults' staying behaviour. Population, Space and Place, 30(3), Article ID e2710.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who stays in their birthplace? The role of multigenerational local ties in young adults' staying behaviour
2024 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 30, no 3, article id e2710Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We explore staying and migration behaviour using a multigenerational perspective on local ties. Based on Swedish register data, we take a shared birthplace between young adults and one or more of their parents and grandparents as a proxy for multigenerational local ties in the young adult's birthplace. Our aim is to investigate whether the presence of this type of longstanding, multigenerational local ties in the birthplace increases one's propensity to stay or return there during young adulthood. Using multinomial logistic regressions, we model the residential trajectories between ages 18 and 30 of individuals born in 1981, 1982, and 1983 who lived in their birthplace at age 18 (i.e., stayed in, moved from, or returned to the birthplace by age 30; N = 185,897). We find that the propensity for staying in one's birthplace increases with each additional parent or grandparent with whom the birthplace is shared. Overall, differences between ties shared with parent(s) and grandparent(s) are surprisingly similar, except ties that are shared with both parents. These have a particularly strong and positive effect. Although men seem to be tied more strongly than women to their fathers and paternal grandparents, we found no differences between men and women in their ties to mothers and maternal grandparents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
grandparents, internal migration, local ties, place of birth, staying, young adulthood
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215368 (URN)10.1002/psp.2710 (DOI)001074478200001 ()2-s2.0-85173435975 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020‐02542EU, Horizon 2020, 740113
Note

Special Issue: Moving and Staying in the Context of the Family

Available from: 2023-10-31 Created: 2023-10-31 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Sandow, E. & Lundholm, E. (2023). Leaving the city: counterurbanisation and internal return migration in Sweden. European Journal of Population, 39(1), Article ID 7.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaving the city: counterurbanisation and internal return migration in Sweden
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 39, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines counterurban migration among young families with children in Sweden and the extent to which these moves reflect return migration, recognising the role of family members and family roots at the destination from a life course perspective. Drawing on register data for all young families with children leaving the Swedish metropolitan areas during the years 2003–2013, we analyse the pattern of counterurban moves and explore how the families’ socioeconomic characteristics, childhood origins, and links to family networks are associated with becoming a counterurban mover and choice of destination. The results show that four out of ten counterurban movers are former urban movers who choose to return to their home region. Among them, almost all have family at the destination, indicating that family ties are important for counterurban migration. In general, urban residents with a background outside metropolitan areas are much more likely to become counterurban movers. Families’ previous residential experiences during childhood, particularly in rural areas, are found to be associated with the residential environment they choose to resettle in when leaving the big city. Counterurban movers making a return move are similar to other counterurban movers in relation to employment status, but tend to be better off economically and move longer distances than other counterurban movers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Counterurbanisation, Return migration, Family migration, Intergenerational networks, Competing risk
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205656 (URN)10.1007/s10680-023-09649-4 (DOI)000945808700002 ()2-s2.0-85150153849 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00290
Available from: 2023-03-13 Created: 2023-03-13 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D., Rentoft, M., Dahlin, A. M., Lundholm, E., Olason, P. I., Sjödin, A., . . . Johansson, E. (2020). A whole-genome sequenced control population in northern Sweden reveals subregional genetic differences. PLOS ONE, 15(9), Article ID e0237721.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A whole-genome sequenced control population in northern Sweden reveals subregional genetic differences
Show others...
2020 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 9, article id e0237721Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The number of national reference populations that are whole-genome sequenced are rapidly increasing. Partly driving this development is the fact that genetic disease studies benefit from knowing the genetic variation typical for the geographical area of interest. A whole-genome sequenced Swedish national reference population (n = 1000) has been recently published but with few samples from northern Sweden. In the present study we have whole-genome sequenced a control population (n = 300) (ACpop) from Västerbotten County, a sparsely populated region in northern Sweden previously shown to be genetically different from southern Sweden. The aggregated variant frequencies within ACpop are publicly available (DOI 10.17044/NBIS/G000005) to function as a basic resource in clinical genetics and for genetic studies. Our analysis of ACpop, representing approximately 0.11% of the population in Västerbotten, indicates the presence of a genetic substructure within the county. Furthermore, a demographic analysis showed that the population from which samples were drawn was to a large extent geographically stationary, a finding that was corroborated in the genetic analysis down to the level of municipalities. Including ACpop in the reference population when imputing unknown variants in a Västerbotten cohort resulted in a strong increase in the number of high-confidence imputed variants (up to 81% for variants with minor allele frequency < 5%). ACpop was initially designed for cancer disease studies, but the genetic structure within the cohort will be of general interest for all genetic disease studies in northern Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library Science, 2020
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175837 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0237721 (DOI)000571887500123 ()32915809 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85090917774 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-16 Created: 2020-10-16 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Barban, N., de Luna, X., Lundholm, E., Svensson, I. & Billari, F. C. (2020). Causal Effects of the Timing of Life-course Events: Age at Retirement and Subsequent Health. Sociological Methods & Research, 49(1), 216-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Causal Effects of the Timing of Life-course Events: Age at Retirement and Subsequent Health
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Sociological Methods & Research, ISSN 0049-1241, E-ISSN 1552-8294, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 216-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we combine the extensive literature on the analysis of life-course trajectories as sequences with the literature on causal inference and propose a new matching approach to investigate the causal effect of the timing of life-course events on subsequent outcomes. Our matching approach takes into account pre-event confounders that are both time-independent and time-dependent as well as life-course trajectories. After matching, treated and control individuals can be compared using standard statistical tests or regression models. We apply our approach to the study of the consequences of the age at retirement on subsequent health outcomes, using a unique data set from Swedish administrative registers. Once selectivity in the timing of retirement is taken into account, effects on hospitalization are small, while early retirement has negative effects on survival. Our approach also allows for heterogeneous treatment effects. We show that the effects of early retirement differ according to preretirement income, with higher income individuals tending to benefit from early retirement, while the opposite is true for individuals with lower income.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
life-course analysis, matching, propensity score, retirement, register data, sequence analysis
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Research subject
Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142215 (URN)10.1177/0049124117729697 (DOI)000506537700008 ()2-s2.0-85062404612 (Scopus ID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-11-26 Created: 2017-11-26 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Lundholm, E., Sandow, E. & Malmberg, G. (2020). Income distribution in family networks by gender and proximity. Population, Space and Place, 26(7), Article ID e2373.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Income distribution in family networks by gender and proximity
2020 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 26, no 7, article id e2373Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whereas the significance of family networks for support and well‐being has been shown in previous research, few studies have analysed the income distribution within family networks. The aim of this study is to examine income distribution within family networks and how they have changed over time for women and men in different parts of the income distribution and if the incomes are more similar in the geographically proximate family network. The analysis is based on register data and by use of ordinary least squares (OLS) and quantile regressions. The results indicate that men in the lowest income group tend to have become more similar to their family network over time. Gender differences have decreased, possibly as an effect of women's higher labour market participation rate leading to decreased income disparity. This paper contributes by highlighting how the uneven distribution of economic resources in family networks adds to individual's own resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
family networks, income distribution, proximity, gender, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173958 (URN)10.1002/psp.2373 (DOI)000554417100001 ()2-s2.0-85088840017 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-10 Created: 2020-08-10 Last updated: 2021-01-07Bibliographically approved
Sandow, E. & Lundholm, E. (2020). Which families move out from metropolitan areas?: Counterurban migration and professions in Sweden. European Urban and Regional Studies, 27(3), 276-289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Which families move out from metropolitan areas?: Counterurban migration and professions in Sweden
2020 (English)In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 276-289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper seeks to contribute to the ongoing revitalisation of the counterurbanisation research within population geography by nuancing counterurban migration beyond the rural–urban dichotomy, including all moves downwards in the urban hierarchy. The focus is to explore counterurban migration patterns among families with children leaving Swedish metropolitan areas, and whether some groups of skilled professions are more likely to make a counterurban move than others. Using register data on all families moving out from metropolitan areas in Sweden during the period 2003–2013, we found a small but steady outflow of families, mainly to medium-sized or small towns. The highly educated are overrepresented among these families, thus providing potential for an inflow of competence to the receiving areas. Contrary to expected, the assumed flexibility in time and space among knowledge sector professionals does not seem to enable them more than others to pursue counterurban moves. Instead, public sector professionals characterise families making a counterurban move to all destination regions, while men with a profession within arts and crafts to a higher extent move with their family to more rural areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Competing risk, counterurban migration, counterurbanisation, event-history analysis, families, profession
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography; Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166868 (URN)10.1177/0969776419893017 (DOI)000503922000001 ()2-s2.0-85077193486 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00290
Available from: 2020-01-06 Created: 2020-01-06 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Mulder, C. H., Lundholm, E. & Malmberg, G. (2020). Young Adults’ Migration to Cities in Sweden: Do Siblings Pave the Way?. Demography, 57, 2221-2244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young Adults’ Migration to Cities in Sweden: Do Siblings Pave the Way?
2020 (English)In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 57, p. 2221-2244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Young adult internal migration forms a large share of the influx of people into largecities in the developed world. We investigate the role of the residential locations ofsiblings for young adults’ migration to large cities, using the case of Sweden and itsfour largest cities: Stockholm, Gothenburg, Malmö/Lund, and Uppsala. We use registerdata for the full Swedish-born population of young adults aged 18–28 living in Swedenin the years 2007–2013 and multinomial logistic regression analyses of migrating toeach of the four cities or migrating elsewhere versus not migrating. Our point ofdeparture is the paving-the-way hypothesis, which posits that young adults who havea sibling living at a migration destination are particularly likely to move to thatdestination, more so than to other destinations. Additional hypotheses are related tohaving more than one sibling in the city and to the gender of siblings living at thedestination. We find support for the paving-the-way hypothesis and an additional effectfor having more than one sibling in the city. Having a sibling of the same gender in acity matters more for moving there than having a sibling of the opposite gender.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Internal migration, Young adults, Siblings, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-177519 (URN)10.1007/s13524-020-00934-z (DOI)000595459300001 ()33258080 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85096994504 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-11 Created: 2020-12-11 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Mulder, C. H., Lundholm, E. & Malmberg, G. (2020). Young adults' return migration from large cities in Sweden: The role of siblings and parents. Population, Space and Place, 26(7), Article ID e2354.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young adults' return migration from large cities in Sweden: The role of siblings and parents
2020 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 26, no 7, article id e2354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Living in cities affects young adults' access to education and work. With the use of register data for 2000-2013, we examined the role of having siblings and parents living close by and having siblings and parents living in the area of origin, in young adults' return migration from the four largest cities in Sweden. We found that young adults were less likely to return, and also less likely to migrate elsewhere, if they had siblings or parents living in the city of residence than if this was not the case. If the parents no longer lived in the region of origin, the young adults were very unlikely to return. Young adults were more likely to return if they had siblings living in that region than if they had no siblings or the siblings lived elsewhere. Adverse circumstances such as dropping out of tertiary education, low income, and unemployment were associated with a greater likelihood of return migration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
parents, return migration, siblings, Sweden, young adults
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173677 (URN)10.1002/psp.2354 (DOI)000545833200001 ()2-s2.0-85087295264 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-07-23 Created: 2020-07-23 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, A. S. & Lundholm, E. (2018). "De som är 65 tror att pensionärsföreningarna är för gamlingar". Äldre i centrum (2), 64-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"De som är 65 tror att pensionärsföreningarna är för gamlingar"
2018 (Swedish)In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 2, p. 4p. 64-67Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stiftelsen Stockholms läns Äldrecentrum, 2018. p. 4
National Category
Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148303 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

Temanummer: Att vara eller inte vara pensionär

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Kulu, H., Lundholm, E. & Malmberg, G. (2018). Is spatial mobility on the rise or in decline?: An order-specific analysis of the migration of young adults in Sweden. Population Studies, 72(3), 323-337
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is spatial mobility on the rise or in decline?: An order-specific analysis of the migration of young adults in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 323-337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to investigate spatial mobility over time. Research on 'new mobilities' suggests increasing movement of individuals, technology, and information. By contrast, studies of internal migration report declining spatial mobility in recent decades. Using longitudinal register data from Sweden, we calculate annual order-specific migration rates to investigate the spatial mobility of young adults over the last three decades. We standardize mobility rates for educational enrolment, educational level, family status, and place of residence to determine how much changes in individuals' life domains explain changes in mobility. Young adults' migration rates increased significantly in the 1990s; although all order-specific migration rates increased, first migration rates increased the most. Changes in population composition, particularly increased enrolment in higher education, accounted for much of the elevated spatial mobility in the 1990s. The analysis supports neither ever increasing mobility nor a long-term rise in rootedness among young adults in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
migration, mobility, life course, young adults, standardization, order-specific analysis, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Human Geography
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148405 (URN)10.1080/00324728.2018.1451554 (DOI)000456729900003 ()29663847 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045449598 (Scopus ID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2024-02-21Bibliographically approved
Projects
Family networks, lifestyle and health [P11-1058:1_RJ]; Umeå University; Publications
Lundholm, E., Sandow, E. & Malmberg, G. (2020). Income distribution in family networks by gender and proximity. Population, Space and Place, 26(7), Article ID e2373.
A good life outside the city? Relocation as a strategy for families in search of a socially sustainable everyday life outside the metropolitan areas [2018-01257_VR]; Umeå UniversityRelocation as a strategy for families in search of a sustainable everyday life outside the metropolitan areas [P18-0396:1_RJ]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2014-7179

Search in DiVA

Show all publications