Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Lindbergh, Kent
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Zarin, R., True, N., Papworth, N., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2013). Be Green: Implementing an Interactive, Cylindrical Display in the Real World. In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays: . Paper presented at PerDis '13, Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, Mountain View, California, June 4-5, 2013 (pp. 55-60). New York, NY: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Be Green: Implementing an Interactive, Cylindrical Display in the Real World
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013, p. 55-60Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many studies in Human-Computer Interaction and related fields, such as pervasive displays, have historically centered around user evaluation and knowledge production, focusing on usability issues and on creating a more efficient user experience. As the trajectory of HCI moves toward the so-called ‘third wave’, new values are being emphasized and explored. These include concepts such as embodiment and engagement, complementing usability as the primary metric of evaluation. This paper explores the ideation, iteration, design, and real-world deployment of such a ‘third wave’ interactive pervasive installation in the form of an interactive, large cylindrical display. The purpose was to display the air quality data in a manner that would inspire elevated environmental consciousness and discussion among Umeå citizens, especially with regard to the environmental impact of different methods of transportation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013
Keywords
Design-oriented HCI, Public installation, Pervasive display, Cylindrical display
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81667 (URN)10.1145/2491568.2491581 (DOI)978-1-4503-2096-2 (ISBN)
Conference
PerDis '13, Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, Mountain View, California, June 4-5, 2013
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., True, N., Papworth, N., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2013). Be Green: implementing an Interactive,Cylindrical Display in the Real World. In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays (PerDis '13): . Paper presented at PerDis '13, June 04 - 05 2013, Mountain View, California, USA (pp. 55-60). ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Be Green: implementing an Interactive,Cylindrical Display in the Real World
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays (PerDis '13): , ACM Press, 2013, p. 55-60Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many studies in Human-Computer Interaction and related fields,such as pervasive displays, have historically centered around userevaluation and knowledge production, focusing on usability issuesand on creating a more efficient user experience. As the trajectoryof HCI moves toward the so-called ‘third wave’, new values arebeing emphasized and explored. These include concepts such asembodiment and engagement, complementing usability as theprimary metric of evaluation. This paper explores the ideation,iteration, design, and real-world deployment of such a ‘thirdwave’ interactive pervasive installation in the form of aninteractive, large cylindrical display. The purpose was to displaythe air quality data in a manner that would inspire elevatedenvironmental consciousness and discussion among Umeåcitizens, especially with regard to the environmental impact ofdifferent methods of transportation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2013
Keywords
Design-Oriented HCI, Public installation, Pervasive Display, Cylindrical Display
National Category
Interaction Technologies Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110253 (URN)978-1-4503-2096-2 (ISBN)
Conference
PerDis '13, June 04 - 05 2013, Mountain View, California, USA
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
True, N., Papworth, N., Zarin, R., Peeters, J., Nilbrink, F., Lindbergh, K., . . . Lind, A. (2013). The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Installation. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts: . Paper presented at 13th Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Paris, France — April 27 - May 02, 2013 (pp. 3003-3006). New York, NY: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Installation
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013, p. 3003-3006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Voice Harvester is an exploratory interactive installation that embodies human voice in physical materials. Sound input is processed, amplified and transmitted through audio drivers connected to a thin, flexible membrane that agitates the material on it. The title “Voice Harvester” is derived from the original design brief, which called for an object able to elicit non-linguistic, expressive, and naturalistic human vocal sounds to explore the full range of capability of the human voice through use of a novel, playful, and embodied interaction. This paper describes the intention, design process, construction, technical details, interaction, and planned/potential uses of this design exploration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013
Keywords
Design, Interaction Design, Design Exploration
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81664 (URN)10.1145/2468356.2479595 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034762437 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-1952-2 (ISBN)
Conference
13th Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Paris, France — April 27 - May 02, 2013
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2012). Stop Motion Animation as a Tool for Sketching in Architecture. In: Proceeding of the 2012 Design Research Society International Conference: . Paper presented at DRS 2012, The 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, (July 1-4, 2012, Bangkok, Thailand).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stop Motion Animation as a Tool for Sketching in Architecture
2012 (English)In: Proceeding of the 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Widely acknowledged as an archetypal design activity, sketching is typically carried out using little more than pen and paper. Today’s designed artifacts however, are often given qualities that are hard to capture with traditional means of sketching. While pen and paper sketching catches the character of a building, it may not equally well capture how that building changes with the seasons, how people pass through it, how the light moves in between its rooms from sunrise to dawn, and how its façade subtly decays over centuries. Yet, it is often exactly these dynamic and interactive aspects that are emphasized in contemporary design work. So is there a way for designers to be able to sketch also these dynamic processes? Over several years and in different design disciplines, we have been exploring the potential of stop motion animation (SMA) to serve this purpose. SMA is a basic form of animation typically applied to make physical objects appear to be alive. The animator moves objects in small increments between individually photographed frames. When the photographs are combined and played back in continuous sequence, the illusion of movement is created. Although SMA has a long history in filmmaking, the animation technique has received scarce attention in most design fields including product design, architecture, and interaction design. This paper brings SMA into the area of sketching in architecture by reporting on the planning, conduct, result, and evaluation of a workshop course carried out with a group of 50 students at Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University, Sweden.

Keywords
Sketching; Stop Motion Animation; Design; Architecture; Technique; Workshop; Course
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110269 (URN)
Conference
DRS 2012, The 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, (July 1-4, 2012, Bangkok, Thailand)
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2012). Using Stop Motion Animation to Sketch in Architecture: A Practical Approach. Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, 7(3), 78-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Stop Motion Animation to Sketch in Architecture: A Practical Approach
2012 (English)In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Widely acknowledged as an archetypal design activity,sketching is typically carried out using little more than penand paper. Today’s designed artifacts however, are oftengiven qualities that are hard to capture with traditionalmeans of sketching. While pen and paper sketchingcatches the character of a building, it may not equally wellcapture how that building changes with the seasons, howpeople pass through it, how the light moves in betweenits rooms from sunrise to dawn, and how its façade subtlydecays over centuries. Yet, it is often exactly these dynamicand interactive aspects that are emphasised incontemporary design work. So is there a way for designersto be able to sketch also these dynamic processes?Over several years and in different design disciplines, wehave been exploring the potential of stop motionanimation (SMA) to serve this purpose. SMA is a basicform of animation typically applied to make physicalobjects appear to be alive. The animator moves objects insmall increments between individually photographedframes. When the photographs are combined and playedback in continuous sequence, the illusion of movement iscreated. Although SMA has a long history in filmmaking,the animation technique has received scarce attention inmost design fields including product design, architecture,and interaction design. This paper brings SMA into thearea of sketching in architecture by reporting on theplanning, conduct, result, and evaluation of a workshopcourse carried out with a group of 50 students at Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University, Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Design and Technology Association, 2012
Keywords
sketching, stop motion animation, design, architecture, Technique, workshop, course
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81663 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications