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Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Lundström, A., Wiklund, U., Winbo, A., Eliasson, H., Karlsson, M. & Rydberg, A. (2023). Cardiac response to water activities in children with Long QT syndrome type 1. PLOS ONE, 18(12), Article ID e0295431.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiac response to water activities in children with Long QT syndrome type 1
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2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 12, article id e0295431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Swimming is a genotype-specific trigger in long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1).

OBJECTIVE: To examine the autonomic response to water activities in children and adolescents with LQT1.

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, LQT1 patients were age and sex matched to one healthy control subject. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded during face immersion (FI), swimming, diving, and whole-body submersion (WBS). Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) was measured. The high frequency (HF) component of HRV was interpreted to reflect parasympathetic activity, while the low frequency (LF) component was interpreted as reflecting the combined influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity on autonomic nervous modulation of the heart.

RESULTS: Fifteen LQT1 patients (aged 7-19 years, all on beta-blocker therapy) and fifteen age and sex matched non-medicated controls were included. No significant ventricular arrhythmias were observed in the LQT1 population during the water activities. Out of these 15 matched pairs, 12 pairs managed to complete FI and WBS for more than 10 seconds and were subsequently included in HR and HRV analyses. In response to FI, the LQT1 group experienced a drop in HR of 48 bpm, compared to 67 bpm in the control group (p = 0.006). In response to WBS, HR decreased by 48 bpm in the LQT1 group and 70 bpm in the control group (p = 0.007). A significantly lower PTOT (p < 0.001) and HF (p = 0.011) component was observed before, during and after FI in LQT1 patients compared with the controls. Before, during and after WBS, a significantly lower total power (p < 0.001), LF (p = 0.002) and HF (p = 0.006) component was observed in the LQT1 patients.

CONCLUSION: A significantly lower HR decrease in response to water activities was observed in LQT1 subjects on beta-blocker therapy, compared to matched non-medicated controls. The data suggests an impaired parasympathetic response in LQT1 children and adolescents. An aberrant autonomic nervous system (ANS) response may cause an autonomic imbalance in this patient group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2023
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218679 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0295431 (DOI)38060596 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85179900660 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-27 Created: 2023-12-27 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Kaizer, A. M., Winbo, A., Clur, S.-A. B., Etheridge, S. P., Ackerman, M. J., Horigome, H., . . . Cuneo, B. F. (2023). Effects of cohort, genotype, variant, and maternal β-blocker treatment on foetal heart rate predictors of inherited long QT syndrome. Europace, 25(11), Article ID euad319.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of cohort, genotype, variant, and maternal β-blocker treatment on foetal heart rate predictors of inherited long QT syndrome
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2023 (English)In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 25, no 11, article id euad319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: In long QT syndrome (LQTS), primary prevention improves outcome; thus, early identification is key. The most common LQTS phenotype is a foetal heart rate (FHR) < 3rd percentile for gestational age (GA) but the effects of cohort, genotype, variant, and maternal β-blocker therapy on FHR are unknown. We assessed the influence of these factors on FHR in pregnancies with familial LQTS and developed a FHR/GA threshold for LQTS.

METHODS AND RESULTS: In an international cohort of pregnancies in which one parent had LQTS, LQTS genotype, familial variant, and maternal β-blocker effects on FHR were assessed. We developed a testing algorithm for LQTS using FHR and GA as continuous predictors. Data included 1966 FHRs at 7-42 weeks' GA from 267 pregnancies/164 LQTS families [220 LQTS type 1 (LQT1), 35 LQTS type 2 (LQT2), and 12 LQTS type 3 (LQT3)]. The FHRs were significantly lower in LQT1 and LQT2 but not LQT3 or LQTS negative. The LQT1 variants with non-nonsense and severe function loss (current density or β-adrenergic response) had lower FHR. Maternal β-blockers potentiated bradycardia in LQT1 and LQT2 but did not affect FHR in LQTS negative. A FHR/GA threshold predicted LQT1 and LQT2 with 74.9% accuracy, 71% sensitivity, and 81% specificity.

CONCLUSION: Genotype, LQT1 variant, and maternal β-blocker therapy affect FHR. A predictive threshold of FHR/GA significantly improves the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for LQT1 and LQT2, above the infant's a priori 50% probability. We speculate this model may be useful in screening for LQTS in perinatal subjects without a known LQTS family history.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Bradycardia, Channelopathy, Foetal arrhythmia, Foetus, Inherited arrhythmias, Long QT syndrome, Potassium currents, Stillbirth, Sudden death
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217540 (URN)10.1093/europace/euad319 (DOI)001107634900003 ()37975542 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85177987474 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-13 Created: 2023-12-13 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Winbo, A., Diamant, U.-B., Persson, J., Jensen, S. M. & Rydberg, A. (2022). To Modify or Not to Modify: Allele-Specific Effects of 3’UTR-KCNQ1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Clinical Phenotype in a Long QT 1 Founder Population Segregating a Dominant-Negative Mutation. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, 11(18), Article ID e025981.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Modify or Not to Modify: Allele-Specific Effects of 3’UTR-KCNQ1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Clinical Phenotype in a Long QT 1 Founder Population Segregating a Dominant-Negative Mutation
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2022 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 11, no 18, article id e025981Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There are conflicting reports with regard to the allele-specific gene suppression effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3’untranslated region (3’UTR) of the KCNQ1 gene in long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) populations. Here we assess the allele-specific effects of 3 previously published 3’UTR-KCNQ1’s SNPs in a LQT1 founder population segregating a dominant-negative mutation.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Bidirectional sequencing of the KCNQ1’s 3’UTR was performed in the p.Y111C founder population (n=232, 147 genotype positive), with a minor allele frequency of 0.1 for SNP1 (rs2519184) and 0.6 for linked SNP2 (rs8234) and SNP3 (rs107980). Allelic phase was assessed in trios aided by haplotype data, revealing a high prevalence of derived SNP2/3 in cis with p.Y111C (89%). Allele-specific association analyses, corrected using a relatedness matrix, were performed between 3’UTR-KCNQ1 SNP genotypes and clinical phenotypes. SNP1 in trans was associated with a significantly higher proportion of symptomatic phenotype compared with no derived SNP1 allele in trans (58% versus 32%, corrected P=0.027). SNP2/3 in cis was associated with a significantly lower proportion of symptomatic phenotype compared with no derived SNP2/3 allele in cis (32% versus 69%, corrected P=0.010).

CONCLUSIONS: Allele-specific modifying effects on symptomatic phenotype of 3’UTR-KCNQ1 SNPs rs2519184, rs8234, and rs107980 were seen in a LQT1 founder population segregating a dominant-negative mutation. The high prevalence of sup-pressive 3’UTR-KCNQ1 SNPs segregating with the founder mutation could contribute to the previously documented low incidence of cardiac events in heterozygous carriers of the p.Y111C KCNQ1 mutation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Heart Association, 2022
Keywords
arrhythmia and electrophysiology, molecular cardiology
National Category
Medical Genetics Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199893 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.122.025981 (DOI)000858504900049 ()36102229 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138386692 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2022-10-03 Created: 2022-10-03 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Winbo, A., Ramanan, S., Eugster, E., Rydberg, A., Jovinge, S., Skinner, J. R. & Montgomery, J. M. (2021). Functional hyperactivity in long OT syndrome type 1 pluripotent stem cell-derived sympathetic neurons. American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 321(1), H217-H227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional hyperactivity in long OT syndrome type 1 pluripotent stem cell-derived sympathetic neurons
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2021 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 321, no 1, p. H217-H227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sympathetic activation is an established trigger of life-threatening cardiac events in long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1). KCNQ1 loss-of-function variants, which underlie LQT1, have been associated with both cardiac arrhythmia and neuronal hyperactivity pathologies. However, the LQT1 sympathetic neuronal phenotype is unknown. Here, we aimed to study human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived sympathetic neurons (SNs) to evaluate neuronal functional phenotype in LQT1. We generated hiPSC-SNs from two patients with LQT1 with a history of sympathetically triggered arrhythmia and KCNQ1 loss-of-function genotypes (c.781_782delinsTC and p.S349W/p.R518X). Characterization of hiPSC-SNs was performed using immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology, and functional LQT1 hiPSC-SN phenotypes compared with healthy control (WT) hiPSC-SNs. hiPSC-SNs stained positive for tyrosine hydroxylase, peripherin, KCNQ1, and secreted norepinephrine. hiPSC-SNs at 60 +/- 2.2 days in vitro had healthy resting membrane potentials (-60 +/- 1.3 mV), and fired rapid action potentials with mature kinetics in response to stimulation. Significant hyperactivity in LQT1 hiPSC-SNs was evident via increased norepinephrine release, increased spontaneous action potential frequency, increased total inward current density, and reduced afterhyperpolarization, compared with age-matched WT hiPSC-SNs. A significantly higher action potential frequency upon current injection and larger synaptic current amplitudes in compound heterozygous p.S349W/p.R518X hiPSC-SNs compared with heterozygous c.781_782delinsTC hiPSC-SNs was also observed, suggesting a potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Together, our data reveal increased neurotransmission and excitability in heterozygous and compound heterozygous patient-derived LQT1 sympathetic neurons, suggesting that the cellular arrhythmogenic potential in LQT1 is not restricted to cardiomyocytes. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Here, we present the first study of patient-derived LQT1 sympathetic neurons that are norepinephrine secreting, and electrophysiologically functional, in vitro. Our data reveal a novel LQT1 sympathetic neuronal phenotype of increased neurotransmission and excitability. The identified sympathetic neuronal hyperactivity phenotype is of particular relevance as it could contribute to the mechanisms underlying sympathetically triggered arrhythmia in LQT1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological Society, 2021
Keywords
arrhythmia mechanisms, human induced pluripotent stem cells, long QT syndrome, sympathetic hyperactivity, sympathetic neurons
National Category
Neurosciences Cell and Molecular Biology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187200 (URN)10.1152/ajpheart.01002.2020 (DOI)000674982700017 ()34142889 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85111137398 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-06 Created: 2021-09-06 Last updated: 2022-10-03Bibliographically approved
Diamant, U.-B., Winbo, A., Marcus, K., Edvinsson, S. & Annika, R. (2021). LQTS founder population in Northern Sweden – the natural history of a potentially fatal inherited cardiac disorder. Biodemography and Social Biology, 66(3-4), 191-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LQTS founder population in Northern Sweden – the natural history of a potentially fatal inherited cardiac disorder
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2021 (English)In: Biodemography and Social Biology, ISSN 1948-5565, E-ISSN 1948-5573, Vol. 66, no 3-4, p. 191-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is an autosomal dominant inherited cardiac disorder associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. In northern Sweden, a LQTS founder mutation (p.Y111C, KCNQ1 gene) was verified by genetic haplotype analysis and genealogical studies, and a common ancestor couple was identified. Clinical studies of this population revealed an apparent mild phenotype. However, due to early commencement of prophylactic treatment, the natural history of this disorder cannot be properly assessed based only on clinical data. By using the family tree mortality ratio method (FTMR), we assessed the natural history of the untreated LQTS founder population. The principle of FTMR is to compare the age-specific mortality rates in a historic population harboring an inherited disorder with the corresponding mortality rates in an unaffected control population.

Initially, we used the general Swedish population during the same period for comparison and observed an apparent increased longevity in the p.Y111C study population. However, when using a control population born in the same area, we observed no differences regarding overall mortality. Moreover, patterns suggesting age- and sex-stratified excess mortality, in accordance with previous LQTS studies, were evident.

This study shows the importance of being aware of historical demographic patterns to avoid misinterpreting when comparing historical data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189842 (URN)10.1080/19485565.2021.1999788 (DOI)000717366500001 ()34761968 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119139494 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20120244
Available from: 2021-11-23 Created: 2021-11-23 Last updated: 2022-10-03Bibliographically approved
Cuneo, B., Clur, S. A., Swan, H., Ackerman, M., Herberg, U., Etheridge, S., . . . Schwartz, P. (2018). Fetal heart rate and arrhythmia profile predicts long QT syndrome (LQTS) genotype: Results of an 8-center international study. Paper presented at 38th Annual Meeting and Pregnancy Meeting of the Society-for-Maternal-Fetal-Medicine, JAN 29-FEB 03, 2018, Dallas, TX. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 218(1), S93-S93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fetal heart rate and arrhythmia profile predicts long QT syndrome (LQTS) genotype: Results of an 8-center international study
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 218, no 1, p. S93-S93Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: 1. Determine if fetal heart rate (FHR) predicts LQTS across gestational ages (GA). 2. Ascertain genotype specific effects on FHR and rhythm.

Study Design: FHR and rhythm data were ascertained from fetuses with maternal or paternal LQTS1, LQTS2 or LQTS3 genotype at 8 international centers. We reviewed obstetrical history including maternal beta blocker (BB) use. At each obstetrical visit, FHRs were calculated from an average of 3 heart beats (ultrasound) or 3 10-second periods of FHR auscultation (Doppler monitor) measured during fetal quiescence. Postnatal genetic testing was performed by commercial laboratories. We compared FHR in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimesters between fetuses with (LQTS+) and without (LQTS-) the family mutation by t-test. Differences in FHR between LQTS genotypes were compared by ANOVA. Log FHR was analyzed by a linear mixed effect model with GA as the continuous variable and adjusting for maternal BB use. The predictive ability of FHR to discriminate LQTS+ from LQTS- was addressed by ROC analysis, evaluating the magnitude of FHR (intercept) and change in FHR (slope) across GA.

Results: Data were available on 51 LQTS+ and 27 LQTS-. Mean FHR differed between LQTS+ and LQTS- fetuses in 2nd and 3rd but not in the 1st trimesters (Table). The magnitude of FHR change in 2nd and 3rd trimesters discriminated LQTS + from LQTS- (both, p<0.05); with AUC of 0.81. FHR effect was most pronounced for LQTS1 and differed significantly between genotypes. LQTS3 did not exhibit a FHR effect at any GA. Only LQTS2 had signature LQTS arrhythmias (2◦ AV block and/or torsade de pointes). Maternal BB had no significant effect on FHR.

Conclusion: In this study with a preponderance of LQTS1, FHR discriminated LQTS+ from LQTS- fetuses in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters. LQTS genotype appears to affect the fetal presentation of LQTS. These findings provide insight into the natural history of LQTS before birth and may facilitate early detection of LQTS1 and LQTS2 fetuses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2018
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144959 (URN)10.1016/j.ajog.2017.10.107 (DOI)000422946900131 ()
Conference
38th Annual Meeting and Pregnancy Meeting of the Society-for-Maternal-Fetal-Medicine, JAN 29-FEB 03, 2018, Dallas, TX
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2022-10-03Bibliographically approved
Winbo, A. & Rydberg, A. (2018). Fetal heart rate reflects mutation burden and clinical outcome in twin probands with KCNQ1 mutations. HeartRhythm case reports, 4(6), 237-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fetal heart rate reflects mutation burden and clinical outcome in twin probands with KCNQ1 mutations
2018 (English)In: HeartRhythm case reports, ISSN 2214-0271, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 237-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present the case of a twin pregnancy of heterozygous andhomozygous long QT syndrome (LQTS) type 1 (LQT1)genotype, referred because of in utero bradycardia in thehomozygous twin at 19 weeks of gestation, with follow-upuntil.12 months of age. Fetal heart rate may predict bothgenotype and disease severity, as previously shown in2 LQTS founder populations.1This unique case report is acomparison of fetal heart rate and clinical outcome in twinprobands of heterozygous and homozygous genotype, in afamily without prior diagnosis of LQTS. In this setting, wediscuss the early management of LQTS and Jervell andLange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) detected in utero.

Keywords
Early detection, Fetal heart rate, In utero bradycardia, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Presymptomatic risk stratification
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158921 (URN)10.1016/j.hrcr.2018.02.008 (DOI)29922582 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046129302 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Winbo, A., Stattin, E.-L., Westin, I. M., Norberg, A., Persson, J., Jensen, S. M. & Rydberg, A. (2017). Sex is a moderator of the association between NOS1AP sequence variants and QTc in two long QT syndrome founder populations: a pedigree-based measured genotype association analysis. BMC Medical Genetics, 18, Article ID 74.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex is a moderator of the association between NOS1AP sequence variants and QTc in two long QT syndrome founder populations: a pedigree-based measured genotype association analysis
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2017 (English)In: BMC Medical Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 18, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sequence variants in the NOS1AP gene have repeatedly been reported to influence QTc, albeit with moderate effect sizes. In the long QT syndrome (LQTS), this may contribute to the substantial QTc variance seen among carriers of identical pathogenic sequence variants. Here we assess three non-coding NOS1APsequence variants, chosen for their previously reported strong association with QTc in normal and LQTS populations, for association with QTc in two Swedish LQT1 founder populations.

Methods: This study included 312 individuals (58% females) from two LQT1 founder populations, whereof 227 genotype positive segregating either Y111C (n = 148) or R518* (n = 79) pathogenic sequence variants in the KCNQ1 gene, and 85 genotype negatives. All were genotyped for NOS1AP sequence variants rs12143842, rs16847548 and rs4657139, and tested for association with QTc length (effect size presented as mean difference between derived and wildtype, in ms), using a pedigree-based measured genotype association analysis. Mean QTc was obtained by repeated manual measurement (preferably in lead II) by one observer using coded 50 mm/s standard 12-lead ECGs.

Results: A substantial variance in mean QTc was seen in genotype positives 476 ± 36 ms (Y111C 483 ± 34 ms; R518* 462 ± 34 ms) and genotype negatives 433 ± 24 ms. Female sex was significantly associated with QTc prolongation in all genotype groups (p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis including the entire study population and adjusted for KCNQ1 genotype, sex and age, NOS1AP sequence variants rs12143842 and rs16847548 (but not rs4657139) were significantly associated with QT prolongation, +18 ms (p = 0.0007) and +17 ms (p = 0.006), respectively. Significant sex-interactions were detected for both sequent variants (interaction term r = 0.892, p < 0.001 and r = 0.944, p < 0.001, respectively). Notably, across the genotype groups, when stratified by sex neither rs12143842 nor rs16847548 were significantly associated with QTc in females (both p = 0.16) while in males, a prolongation of +19 ms and +8 ms (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02) was seen in multivariable analysis, explaining up to 23% of QTc variance in all males.

Conclusions: Sex was identified as a moderator of the association between NOS1AP sequence variants and QTc in two LQT1 founder populations. This finding may contribute to QTc sex differences and affect the usefulness of NOS1AP as a marker for clinical risk stratification in LQTS.

Keywords
Long QT syndrome, Sequence variants, Sex, Risk stratification, Modifier genes, QT prolongation, xsequence-variant interaction, Genotype-phenotype interactions, Founder populations
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138033 (URN)10.1186/s12881-017-0435-2 (DOI)000405695100001 ()2-s2.0-85024845650 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mann, S. A., Imtiaz, M., Winbo, A., Rydberg, A., Perry, M. D., Couderc, J.-P., . . . Vandenberg, J. I. (2016). Convergence of models of human ventricular myocyte electrophysiology after global optimization to recapitulate clinical long QT phenotypes. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 100, 25-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convergence of models of human ventricular myocyte electrophysiology after global optimization to recapitulate clinical long QT phenotypes
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, ISSN 0022-2828, E-ISSN 1095-8584, Vol. 100, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In-silico models of human cardiac electrophysiology are now being considered for prediction of cardiotoxicity as part of the preclinical assessment phase of all new drugs. We ask the question whether any of the available models are actually fit for this purpose. We tested three models of the human ventricular action potential, the O'hara-Rudy (ORD11), the Grandi-Bers (GB10) and the Ten Tusscher (TT06) models. We extracted clinical QT data for LQTS1 and LQTS2 patients with nonsense mutations that would be predicted to cause 50% loss of function in I-Ks and I-Kr respectively. We also obtained clinical QT data for LQTS3 patients. We then used a global optimization approach to improve the existing in silico models so that they reproduced all three clinical data sets more closely. We also examined the effects of adrenergic stimulation in the different LQTS subsets. All models, in their original form, produce markedly different and unrealistic predictions of QT prolongation for LQTS1, 2 and 3. After global optimization of the maximum conductances for membrane channels, all models have similar current densities during the action potential, despite differences in kinetic properties of the channels in the different models, and more closely reproduce the prolongation of repolarization seen in all LQTS subtypes. In-silico models of cardiac electrophysiology have the potential to be tremendously useful in complementing traditional preclinical drug testing studies. However, our results demonstrate they should be carefully validated and optimized to clinical data before they can be used for this purpose.

Keywords
Repolarization, Long QT syndrome, In-silico models, Adrenergic regulation, Global optimization, computational cardiology
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130249 (URN)10.1016/j.yjmcc.2016.09.011 (DOI)000390288500004 ()27663173 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84989179778 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-14 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Winbo, A., Fosdal, I., Lindh, M., Diamant, U.-B., Persson, J., Wettrell, G. & Rydberg, A. (2015). Third Trimester Fetal Heart Rate Predicts Phenotype and Mutation Burden in the Type 1 Long QT Syndrome. Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 8(4), 806-814
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Third Trimester Fetal Heart Rate Predicts Phenotype and Mutation Burden in the Type 1 Long QT Syndrome
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2015 (English)In: Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, ISSN 1941-3149, E-ISSN 1941-3084, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 806-814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background—Early diagnosis and risk stratification is of clinical importance in the long QT syndrome (LQTS), however, little genotype-specific data are available regarding fetal LQTS. We investigate third trimester fetal heart rate, routinely recorded within public maternal health care, as a possible marker for LQT1 genotype and phenotype.

Methods and Results—This retrospective study includes 184 fetuses from 2 LQT1 founder populations segregating p.Y111C and p.R518X (74 noncarriers and 110KCNQ1 mutation carriers, whereof 13 double mutation carriers). Pedigree-based measured genotype analysis revealed significant associations between fetal heart rate, genotype, and phenotype; mean third trimester prelabor fetal heart rates obtained from obstetric records (gestational week 29–41) were lower per added mutation (no mutation, 143±5 beats per minute; single mutation, 134±8 beats per minute; double mutations, 111±6 beats per minute; P<0.0001), and lower in symptomatic versus asymptomatic mutation carriers (122±10 versus 137±9 beats per minute; P<0.0001). Strong correlations between fetal heart rate and neonatal heart rate (r=0.700; P<0.001), and postnatal QTc (r=−0.762; P<0.001) were found. In a multivariable model, fetal genotype explained the majority of variance in fetal heart rate (−10 beats per minute per added mutation; P<1.0×10–23). Arrhythmia symptoms and intrauterine β-blocker exposure each predicted −7 beats per minute, P<0.0001.

Conclusions—In this study including 184 fetuses from 2 LQT1 founder populations, third trimester fetal heart rate discriminated between fetal genotypes and correlated with severity of postnatal cardiac phenotype. This finding strengthens the role of fetal heart rate in the early detection and risk stratification of LQTS, particularly for fetuses with double mutations, at high risk of early life-threatening arrhythmias.

Keywords
arrhythmias, cardiac, genotype, genetic association studies, heart rate, long QT syndrome
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108470 (URN)10.1161/CIRCEP.114.002552 (DOI)000359740500011 ()26019114 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84939786820 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9323-3166

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