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Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Rydberg, J., Lindborg, T., Lidman, F., Tröjbom, M., Berglund, S., Lindborg, E., . . . Laudon, H. (2023). Biogeochemical cycling in a periglacial environment: a multi-element mass-balance budget for a catchment in West Greenland. Catena (Cremlingen. Print), 231, Article ID 107311.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biogeochemical cycling in a periglacial environment: a multi-element mass-balance budget for a catchment in West Greenland
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2023 (English)In: Catena (Cremlingen. Print), ISSN 0341-8162, E-ISSN 1872-6887, Vol. 231, article id 107311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is an increased awareness that the biogeochemical cycling at high latitudes will be affected by a changing climate. However, because biogeochemical studies most often focus on a limited number of elements (i.e., C, P and N) we lack baseline conditions for many elements. In this work, we present a 42-element mass-balance budget for lake dominated catchment in West Greenland. By combining site specific concentration data from various catchment compartments (precipitation, active layer soils, groundwater, permafrost, lake water, lake sediments and biota) with catchment geometries and hydrological fluxes from a distributed hydrological model we have assessed present-day mobilization, transport and accumulation of a whole suite of elements with different biogeochemical behavior. Our study shows that, under the cold and dry conditions that prevails close to the inland ice-sheet: i) eolian processes are important for the transport of elements associated with mineral particles (e.g., Al, Ti, Si), and that these elements tend to accumulate in the lake sediment, ii) that even if weathering rates are slowed down by the dry and cold climate, weathering in terrestrial soils is an important source for many elements (e.g., lanthanides), iii) that the cold and dry conditions results in an accumulation of elements supplied by wet deposition (e.g., halogens) in both terrestrial soils and the lake-water column, and iv) that lead and sulfur from legacy pollution are currently being released from the terrestrial system. All these processes are affected by the climate, and we can therefore expect that the cycling of the majority of the 42 studied elements will change in the future. However, it is not always possible to predict the direction of this change, which shows that more multi-element biogeochemical studies are needed to increase our understanding of the consequences of a changing climate for the Arctic environment.

Keywords
Aquatic, Dry periglacial landscape, Mass-balance budget, Multi element, Terrestrial, Whole catchment
National Category
Climate Research Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-211791 (URN)10.1016/j.catena.2023.107311 (DOI)2-s2.0-85162995365 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-12 Created: 2023-07-12 Last updated: 2023-07-12Bibliographically approved
Capo, E., Giguet-Covex, C., Rouillard, A., Nota, K., Heintzman, P. D., Vuillemin, A., . . . Parducci, L. (2021). Lake sedimentary dna research on past terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity: Overview and recommendations. Quaternary, 4(1), Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake sedimentary dna research on past terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity: Overview and recommendations
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2021 (English)In: Quaternary, E-ISSN 2571-550X, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 6Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of lake sedimentary DNA to track the long-term changes in both terrestrial and aquatic biota is a rapidly advancing field in paleoecological research. Although largely applied nowadays, knowledge gaps remain in this field and there is therefore still research to be conducted to ensure the reliability of the sedimentary DNA signal. Building on the most recent literature and seven original case studies, we synthesize the state-of-the-art analytical procedures for effective sampling, extraction, amplification, quantification and/or generation of DNA inventories from sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) via high-throughput sequencing technologies. We provide recommendations based on current knowledge and best practises.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Biodiversity, Lake sediments, Metabarcoding, Metagenomics, Paleoecology, Paleogenetics, Paleogenomics, Paleolimnology, Sedimentary ancient DNA, Sedimentary DNA
National Category
Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182945 (URN)10.3390/quat4010006 (DOI)000633093700001 ()2-s2.0-85104594727 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-11 Created: 2021-05-11 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Capo, E., Ninnes, S., Domaizon, I., Bigler, C., Wang, X.-R., Bindler, R. & Rydberg, J. (2021). Landscape setting drives the microbial eukaryotic community structure in four Swedish mountain lakes over the holocene. Microorganisms, 9(2), Article ID 355.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Landscape setting drives the microbial eukaryotic community structure in four Swedish mountain lakes over the holocene
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2021 (English)In: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

On the annual and interannual scales, lake microbial communities are known to be heavily influenced by environmental conditions both in the lake and in its terrestrial surroundings. How-ever, the influence of landscape setting and environmental change on shaping these communities over a longer (millennial) timescale is rarely studied. Here, we applied an 18S metabarcoding approach to DNA preserved in Holocene sediment records from two pairs of co‐located Swedish mountain lakes. Our data revealed that the microbial eukaryotic communities were strongly influenced by catchment characteristics rather than location. More precisely, the microbial communities from the two bedrock lakes were largely dominated by unclassified Alveolata, while the peatland lakes showed a more diverse microbial community, with Ciliophora, Chlorophyta and Chytrids among the more predominant groups. Furthermore, for the two bedrock‐dominated lakes—where the oldest DNA samples are dated to only a few hundred years after the lake formation—certain Alveolata, Chlorophytes, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria taxa were found prevalent throughout all the sediment profiles. Our work highlights the importance of species sorting due to landscape setting and the persistence of microbial eukaryotic diversity over millennial timescales in shaping modern lake microbial communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
18S metabarcoding, Holocene, Lakes, Microbial eukaryotes, Sedimentary DNA
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180793 (URN)10.3390/microorganisms9020355 (DOI)000622825300001 ()2-s2.0-85100648541 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-25 Created: 2021-02-25 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Lindborg, T., Rydberg, J., Andersson, E., Lofgren, A., Lindborg, E., Saetre, P., . . . Laudon, H. (2020). A carbon mass-balance budget for a periglacial catchment in West Greenland: Linking the terrestrial and aquatic systems. Science of the Total Environment, 711, Article ID 134561.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A carbon mass-balance budget for a periglacial catchment in West Greenland: Linking the terrestrial and aquatic systems
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2020 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 711, article id 134561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is predicted to have far reaching consequences for the mobility of carbon in arctic landscapes. On a regional scale, carbon cycling is highly dependent on interactions between terrestrial and aquatic parts of a catchment. Despite this, studies that integrate the terrestrial and aquatic systems and study entire catchments using site-specific data are rare. In this work, we use data partly published by Lindborg et al. (2016a) to calculate a whole-catchment carbon mass-balance budget for a periglacial catchment in West Greenland. Our budget shows that terrestrial net primary production is the main input of carbon (99% of input), and that most carbon leaves the system through soil respiration (90% of total export/storage). The largest carbon pools are active layer soils (53% of total carbon stock or 13 kg C m (2)), permafrost soils (30% of total carbon stock or 7.6 kg C m (2)) and lake sediments (13% of total carbon stock or 10 kg C m (2)). Hydrological transport of carbon from the terrestrial to aquatic system is lower than in wetter climates, but the annual input of 4100 kg C yr (1) (or 3.5 g C m (2) yr (1)) that enters the lake via runoff is still three times larger than the eolian input of terrestrial carbon. Due to the dry conditions, the hydrological export of carbon from the catchment is limited (5% of aquatic export/storage or 0.1% of total export/storage). Instead, CO2 evasion from the lake surface and sediment burial accounts for 57% and 38% of aquatic export/storage, respectively (or 0.8% and 0.5% of total export/storage), and Two-Boat Lake acts as a net source of carbon to the atmosphere. The limited export of carbon to downstream water bodies make our study system different from wetter arctic environments, where hydrological transport is an important export pathway for carbon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Carbon-budget, Whole catchment, Dry periglacial landscape, Terrestrial, Aquatic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168804 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.134561 (DOI)000509344700003 ()31818588 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076609804 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Rydberg, J., Cooke, C. A., Tolu, J., Wolfe, A. P. & Vinebrooke, R. D. (2020). An assessment of chlorophyll preservation in lake sediments using multiple analytical techniques applied to the annually laminated lake sediments of Nylandssjön. Journal of Paleolimnology, 64(4), 379-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An assessment of chlorophyll preservation in lake sediments using multiple analytical techniques applied to the annually laminated lake sediments of Nylandssjön
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 379-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chlorophyll is frequently used as a proxy for autochthonous production in lakes. This use of chlorophyll concentrations in sediments to infer historical changes in lake primary production relies heavily on the assumption that preservation is sufficient to reflect the productivity in a meaningful way. In this study, we use a series of freeze cores from a lake with annually laminated sediments to assess how reliable down-core trends in chlorophyll are, and to what extent chlorophyll is degraded in the sediment. A striking consistency in the down-core chlorophyll trends in four sediment cores collected in different years (1983, 1992, 2002 and 2010) shows that the sediment preserves a consistent chlorophyll signal over longer timescales. However, there are also clear signs that diagenetic processes within the sediment affect the chlorophyll concentration in sediment layers younger than 10-15 years. This implies that care is needed when interpreting chlorophyll trends in recent sediments. Further, our data show that high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and visible reflectance spectroscopy (VRS) detect similar chlorophyll concentrations for recently dried samples. A third analytical technique, pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, which provides semi-quantitative values for chlorophyll, also produce a temporal trend that is highly correlated with data from the two quantitative techniques. For samples that have been stored dried at room temperature for several years there is, however, a large discrepancy between the two quantitative techniques. The VRS method is more robust with regards to degradation during storage, while HPLC results demonstrate clear storage effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Sedimentary pigments, Chlorophyll, Degradation, Visible reflectance spectroscopy (VRS), HPLC, Pyrolysis-GC, MS, Nylandssjön
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-176542 (URN)10.1007/s10933-020-00143-z (DOI)000576820500004 ()2-s2.0-85092275160 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-11 Created: 2020-11-11 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Kylander, M. E., Soderlindh, J., Schenk, F., Gyllencreutz, R., Rydberg, J., Bindler, R., . . . Skelton, A. (2020). It's in your glass: a history of sea level and storminess from the Laphroaig bog, Islay (southwestern Scotland). Boreas, 49(1), 152-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It's in your glass: a history of sea level and storminess from the Laphroaig bog, Islay (southwestern Scotland)
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2020 (English)In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 152-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Severe winter windstorms have become an increasingly common occurrence over recent decades in northwestern Europe. Although there exists considerable uncertainty, storminess is projected to increase in the future. On centennial to millennial time scales in particular, the mechanisms forcing storminess remain unsettled. We contribute to available palaeostorm records by reconstructing changes over the last 6670 years using a coastal peat sequence retrieved from the ombrotrophic Laphroaig bog on Islay, southwestern Scotland. We use a combination of ash content, grain size and elemental chemistry to identify periods of greater storminess, which are dated to 6605, 6290-6225, 5315-5085, 4505, 3900-3635, 3310-3130, 2920-2380, 2275-2190, 2005-1860, 1305-1090, 805-435 and 275 cal. a BP. Storm signals in the first half of the record up to similar to 3000 cal. a BP are mainly apparent in the grain-size changes. Samples from this time period also have a different elemental signature than those later in the record. We speculate that this is due to receding sea levels and the consequent establishment of a new sand source in the form of dunes, which are still present today. The most significant events and strongest winds are found during the Iron Ages Cold Epoch (2645 cal. a BP), the transition into, and in the middle of, the Roman Ages Warm Period (2235 and 1965 cal. a BP) and early in the Little Ice Age (545 cal. a BP). The Laphroaig record generally agrees with regionally relevant peat palaeostorm records from Wales and the Outer Hebrides, although the relative importance of the different storm periods is not the same. In general, stormier periods are coeval with cold periods in the region as evidenced by parallels with increased ice-rafted debris in the North Atlantic, highlighting that sea-ice conditions could impact future storminess and storm track position.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166590 (URN)10.1111/bor.12409 (DOI)000484313400001 ()2-s2.0-85071378089 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-19 Created: 2019-12-19 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Sjöström, J. K., Martínez Cortizas, A., Hansson, S. V., Silva Sánchez, N., Bindler, R., Rydberg, J., . . . Kylander, M. E. (2020). Paleodust deposition and peat accumulation rates: bog size matters. Chemical Geology, 554, Article ID 119795.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paleodust deposition and peat accumulation rates: bog size matters
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2020 (English)In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 554, article id 119795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a high-resolution peat paleodust and accumulation rate record spanning the last 8300 years from Draftinge Mosse (400 ha), southern Sweden (57 degrees 06'27.6 '' N 13 degrees 42'54.1 '' E). The record was analysed for peat accumulation rates (PAR), elemental concentrations, mineralogy, and plant macrofossil content. Five periods of increased mineral deposition were recorded. The first event occurred between similar to 6280 and similar to 5570 cal BP, during the fen to bog transition. This is followed by four atmospheric mineral dust events (DE) which were recorded in the ombrotrophic section of the sequence at (cal BP): similar to 2200; similar to 1385-1150; similar to 830-590, and from similar to 420 to the present. Statistical analysis and elemental ratios indicated that both the mineralogy and grain size shifted when the system transitioned from fen into bog, showing that the governing transport process shifted with the peat-land succession stages. This highlights the importance of identifying peatland succession stages within peat paleodust studies. Following all four DE, increases in PAR were observed, implying a coupling to dust deposition. Comparison of DE and PAR with a paleodust record from Store Mosse, a 20 times larger bog located ca 18 km away (Kylander et al. 2016), showed that both PAR and dust deposition are largely represented by single-core reconstructions, indicating that they are driven by a common climate forcing mechanism. However, higher PAR and dust deposition rates were observed in the more moderately sized Draftinge Mosse, suggesting that the size of the bog is important to consider in peat paleodust studies. Furthermore, the smaller bog responded more rapidly to hydrological changes, indicating that the size of the bog affects its' buffering capacity. Authigenic carbonates, observed here during episodes of rapid peat growth, coincide with changes in REE ratios, indicating that authigenic peat processes potentially cause REE fractionation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Peat paleodust, Atmospheric deposition, Peat accumulation rate, Geochemistry, Rare earth elements, Mineralogy
National Category
Geochemistry Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-176477 (URN)10.1016/j.chemgeo.2020.119795 (DOI)000580659800003 ()2-s2.0-85092232217 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-13 Created: 2020-11-13 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Myrstener, E., Biester, H., Bigler, C., Lidberg, W., Meyer-Jacob, C., Rydberg, J. & Bindler, R. (2019). Environmental footprint of small-scale, historical mining and metallurgy in the Swedish boreal forest landscape: The Moshyttan blast furnace as microcosm. The Holocene, 29(4), 578-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental footprint of small-scale, historical mining and metallurgy in the Swedish boreal forest landscape: The Moshyttan blast furnace as microcosm
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2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 578-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The history of mining and smelting and the associated pollution have been documented using lake sediments for decades, but the broader ecological implications are not well studied. We analyzed sediment profiles covering the past similar to 10,000 years from three lakes associated with an iron blast furnace in central Sweden, as an example of the many small-scale furnaces with historical roots in the medieval period. With a focus on long-term lake-water quality, we analyzed multiple proxies including geochemistry, pollen and charcoal, diatom composition and inferred pH, biogenic silica (bSi), visible near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIRS)-inferred lake-water total organic carbon (LW-TOC), and VNIRS-inferred sediment chlorophyll (sed-Chl). All three lakes had stable conditions during the middle Holocene (similar to 5000 BCE to 1110 CE) typical of oligo-dystrophic lakes: pH 5.4-5.6, LW-TOC 15-18 mg L-1. The most important diatom taxa include, for example, Aulacoseira scalaris, Brachysira neoexilis, and Frustulia saxonica. From similar to 1150 CE, decreases in LW-TOC, bSi, and sed-Chl in all three lakes coincide with a suite of proxies indicating disturbance associated with local, small-scale agriculture, and the more widespread use of the landscape in the past (e.g. forest grazing, charcoal production). Most important was a decline in LW-TOC by 30-50% in the three lakes prior to the 20th century. In addition, the one lake (Fickeln) downstream of the smelter and main areas of cultivation experienced a shift in diatom composition (mainly increasing Asterionella formosa) and a 0.6 pH increase coinciding with increasing cereal pollen and signs of blast furnace activity. The pH did not change in the other two lakes in response to disturbance; however, these lakes show a slight increase (0.3-0.5 pH units) because of modern liming. LW-TOC has returned to background levels in the downstream lake and remains lower in the other two.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
diatoms, environmental change, geochemistry, human impacts, lake-water carbon, sediment, total organic carbon
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158734 (URN)10.1177/0959683618824741 (DOI)000463639500004 ()2-s2.0-85061205652 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Capo, E., Rydberg, J., Tolu, J., Domaizon, I., Debroas, D., Bindler, R. & Bigler, C. (2019). How Does Environmental Inter-annual Variability Shape Aquatic Microbial Communities?: A 40-Year Annual Record of Sedimentary DNA From a Boreal Lake (Nylandssjon, Sweden). Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, Article ID 245.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Does Environmental Inter-annual Variability Shape Aquatic Microbial Communities?: A 40-Year Annual Record of Sedimentary DNA From a Boreal Lake (Nylandssjon, Sweden)
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, article id 245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To assess the sensitivity of lakes to anthropogenically-driven environmental changes (e.g., nutrient supply, climate change), it is necessary to first isolate the effects of between-year variability in weather conditions. This variability can strongly impact a lake's biological community especially in boreal and arctic areas where snow phenology play an important role in controlling the input of terrestrial matter to the lake. Identifying the importance of this inherent variability is difficult without time series that span at least several decades. Here, we applied a molecular approach (metabarcoding on eukaryotic 18S rRNA genes and qPCR on cyanobacterial 16S rRNA genes) to sedimentary DNA (sed-DNA) to unravel the annual variability of microbial community in 40 years' sediment record from the boreal lake Nylandssjon which preserve annually-laminated sediments. Our comparison between seasonal meteorological data, sediment inorganic geochemistry (X-ray fluorescence analyses) and organic biomarkers (pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses), demonstrated that inter-annual variability strongly influence the sediment composition in Nylandssjon. Spring temperature, snow and ice phenology (e.g., the percentage of snow loss in spring, the timing of lake ice-off) were identified as important drivers for the inputs of terrestrial material to the lake, and were therefore also important for shaping the aquatic biological community. Main changes were detected in the late-80s/mid-90s and mid-2000s associated with increases in algal productivity, in total richness of the protistan community and in relative abundances of Chlorophyta, Dinophyceae as well as Cyanobacteria abundance. These changes could be linked to a decline in terrestrial inputs to the lake during the snow melt and run-off period, which in turn was driven by warmer winter temperatures. Even if our data shows that meteorological factors do affect the sediment composition and microbial communities, they only explain part of the variability. This is most likely a consequence of the high inter-annual variability in abiotic and biotic parameters highlighting the difficulty to draw firm conclusions concerning drivers of biological changes at an annual or sub-annual resolution even with the 40-year varved sediment record from Nylandssjon. Hence, it is necessary to have an even longer time perspective in order to reveal the full implications of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
varved sediment record, sedimentary DNA, protists, metabarcoding, meteorological data, inorganic geochemistry, organic proxies, paleolimnology
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161823 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2019.00245 (DOI)000474916200001 ()2-s2.0-85088859861 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Olajos, F., Bokma, F., Bartels, P., Myrstener, E., Rydberg, J., Öhlund, G., . . . Englund, G. (2018). Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 9(3), 535-543
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment
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2018 (English)In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]
  1. Detection of DNA in lake sediments holds promise as a tool to study processes like extinction, colonization, adaptation and evolutionary divergence. However, low concentrations make sediment DNA difficult to detect, leading to high false negative rates. Additionally, contamination could potentially lead to high false positive rates. Careful laboratory procedures can reduce false positive and negative rates, but should not be assumed to completely eliminate them. Therefore, methods are needed that identify potential false positive and negative results, and use this information to judge the plausibility of different interpretations of DNA data from natural archives.
  2. We developed a Bayesian algorithm to infer the colonization history of a species using records of DNA from lake-sediment cores, explicitly labelling some observations as false positive or false negative. We illustrate the method by analysing DNA of whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) from sediment cores covering the past 10,000 years from two central Swedish lakes. We provide the algorithm as an R-script, and the data from this study as example input files.
  3. In one lake, Stora Lögdasjön, where connectivity with the proto-Baltic Sea and the degree of whitefish ecotype differentiation suggested colonization immediately after deglaciation, DNA was indeed successfully recovered and amplified throughout the post-glacial sediment. For this lake, we found no loss of detection probability over time, but a high false negative rate. In the other lake, Hotagen, where connectivity and ecotype differentiation suggested colonization long after deglaciation, DNA was amplified only in the upper part of the sediment, and colonization was estimated at 2,200 bp based on the assumption that successful amplicons represent whitefish presence. Here the earliest amplification represents a false positive with a posterior probability of 41%, which increases the uncertainty in the estimated time of colonization.
  4. Complementing careful laboratory procedures aimed at preventing contamination, our method estimates contamination rates from the data. By combining these results with estimates of false negative rates, our models facilitate unbiased interpretation of data from natural DNA archives.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Ecological Society, 2018
Keywords
ancient DNA, colonization, Coregonus lavaretus, detection probability, divergence, environmental DNA, lake sediment, population age
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143248 (URN)10.1111/2041-210X.12890 (DOI)000426867600010 ()2-s2.0-85030156606 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5110
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2024-05-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6856-6965

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