Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Sundvall, S. & Junkka, J. (2024). Better off in the city? Economic outcomes of rural out‐migration in Sweden: sibling study of cohorts 1960–1984. Population, Space and Place
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Better off in the city? Economic outcomes of rural out‐migration in Sweden: sibling study of cohorts 1960–1984
2024 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines disparities in income levels and employment status between individuals who migrate from rural areas and their siblings who remained in rural settings in Sweden for cohorts born 1960–1984. Utilizing comprehensive Swedish register data, we track the economic outcomes at age 35 or rural residents who migrated between ages 15 and 25, comparing them to non-migrating siblings. Our analysis, employing binomial logit and log-linear models for employment odds and income levels, respectively, reveals that while rural out-migration generally leads to higher income, it does not significantly impact employment status. The study underscores the role of individual and family-specific factors—such as gender and education—and broader time- and place-dependent structures in mediating migration's effects. We find that income disparity between migrants and non-migrants has increased since the 1990s and that the differences increase with the urbanization level of the destination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
life course, rural migration, siblings, Sweden
National Category
History Economic Geography
Research subject
Population studies; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222610 (URN)10.1002/psp.2765 (DOI)2-s2.0-85189031646 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-22 Created: 2024-03-22 Last updated: 2024-05-06
Junkka, J. & Hiltunen, M. (2024). Temperature- and seasonality-related infectious disease mortality among infants: a retrospective time-series study of Sweden, 1868–1892. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, 22, 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temperature- and seasonality-related infectious disease mortality among infants: a retrospective time-series study of Sweden, 1868–1892
2024 (English)In: Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, ISSN 1728-4414, E-ISSN 1728-5305, Vol. 22, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate conditions, such as ambient temperatures, play a crucial role in infants' vulnerability to infectious diseases. However, little is known about how climate conditions, such as temperatures and seasonality, affect infectious disease mortality among infants in high mortality settings. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between cause-specific infant mortality and ambient temperatures and seasonality. We applied a retrospective study design using parish register data from Sweden covering the 1868–1892 period in combination with daily temperature data. Mortality due to water- and foodborne diseases, airborne infectious diseases and other causes was modelled as a function of temperature exposure in the previous 14 days using distributed lagged non-linear models. We found that airborne infectious diseasemortality was not related to cold temperatures, but rather to seasonality. The summer peaks in mortality due to water- and foodborne infections were associated with high temperatures, and not with seasonality. The increased vulnerability of infants to infectious diseases at high temperatures is a significant future risk, given that global temperatures are projected to rise in the coming decades.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Verlag, 2024
Keywords
Temperature, Seasonality, Infectious disease, Infant mortality, Retrospective study
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Infectious Medicine
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222621 (URN)10.1553/p-33g4-pgab (DOI)
Note

ISBN: 978-3-7001-9476-7 (Print Edition) 

ISBN: 978-3-7001-9477-4 (Online Edition)

Available from: 2024-03-22 Created: 2024-03-22 Last updated: 2024-03-26Bibliographically approved
Junkka, J. & Hiltunen, M. (2022). Infectious disease mortality among infants, seasonality and ambient temperature in Sweden, 1868-1892. Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infectious disease mortality among infants, seasonality and ambient temperature in Sweden, 1868-1892
2022 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Climate variability, such as ambient temperature, is crucial for infants' vulnerability to infectious diseases. However, little is known about how climate variability affects infectious disease mortality among infants in high mortality settings. We investigate the association between ambient temperature, seasonality and cause-specific infant mortality. Parish register data from the Sundsvall region in Northern Sweden covering the period 1868-1892 were used in combination with daily temperature data from Härnösand. Mortality due to water- and food-born diseases, airborne infectious diseases, and other causes were modelled as a function of temperature exposure in the previous 14 days using time-series analysis. We found that airborne infectious disease mortality was not related to cold temperatures but rather to seasonality, and that the summer mortality peak due to water- and foodborne infections were associated with high temperatures and not with seasonality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå University, 2022. p. 32
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2022:23
National Category
History Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193107 (URN)
Available from: 2022-03-15 Created: 2022-03-15 Last updated: 2022-03-15Bibliographically approved
Liselotte, E., Junkka, J., Sandström, G. & Vikström, L. (2022). Supply or demand? Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–59. History of Psychiatry, 33(2), 180-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply or demand? Institutionalization of the mentally ill in the emerging Swedish welfare state, 1900–59
2022 (English)In: History of Psychiatry, ISSN 0957-154X, E-ISSN 1740-2360, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 180-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historical studies on the institutionalization of the mentally ill have primarily relied on data for institutionalized patients rather than the population at risk. Consequently, the underlying factors of institutionalization are unclear. Using Swedish longitudinal microdata from 1900–59 reporting mental disorders, we examine whether supply factors, such as distance to institutions and number of asylum beds, influenced the risk of institutionalization, in addition to demand factors such as access to family. Institutionalization risks were associated with the supply of beds and proximity to an asylum, but also dependent on families’ unmet demand for care of relatives. As the supply of mental care met this family-driven demand in the 1930s, the relative risk of institutionalization increased among those lacking family networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Asylum, confinement, institutionalization, mental illness, Sweden, 20th century
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Historical Demography; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-195005 (URN)10.1177/0957154x221084976 (DOI)000798273900004 ()2-s2.0-85130323789 (Scopus ID)
Projects
MAW 2019.0003 / Risks and Loads from Disabilities and Later Life Outcomes
Available from: 2022-05-19 Created: 2022-05-19 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Vikström, L., Junkka, J. & Karhina, K. (2022). Two centuries of disability disadvantages in Swedish partnerships. Disability & Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two centuries of disability disadvantages in Swedish partnerships
2022 (English)In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Partnership signifies a key transition for social recognition in society. This study identifies long-term trends of disability and partnership in Sweden evidenced by the chances to marry or cohabit during two centuries (1800s–2010s). We compare results from studies within one comprehensive disability project, making use of quantitative life-course analysis and population records. Our findings uncover a remarkably persistent trend from the 1800s until the 2010s. Disability impeded both men and women’s partnership chances significantly (by about 60%), with some variations across disability types, genders, and periods. That disabled people did not enjoy greater access to a partner relative to others while Sweden moved from a poor country to a wealthy welfare state, suggests that disability persistently affords fewer possibilities to participate in social life and society. Our study is exceptional by combining disability with partnership and comparing recent results with the past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Disability, inequality, life course, marriage, partnership, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204477 (URN)10.1080/09687599.2022.2160924 (DOI)000916093000001 ()2-s2.0-85147004235 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2023-02-17 Created: 2023-02-17 Last updated: 2023-09-05
Vikström, L., Karhina, K. & Junkka, J. (2022). Two centuries of inequalities: disability and partnership in Sweden. In: Magda Nico; Gary Pollock (Ed.), The Routledge handbook of contemporary inequalities and the life course: (pp. 136-151). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two centuries of inequalities: disability and partnership in Sweden
2022 (English)In: The Routledge handbook of contemporary inequalities and the life course / [ed] Magda Nico; Gary Pollock, London: Routledge, 2022, p. 136-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study brings together a unique selection of results that reveal how disabilities shaped the marriage/cohabitation chances in Swedish populations from the 1800s until recent decades. Using longitudinal population registers and a life course approach, multivariate statistical analysis helps to estimate the impact of disability on partnership relative to other individual-level attributes in different temporal contexts of Swedish society. While there were some differences by type of disability and gender, the overall finding is that disabilities kept weakening people’s partnership chances to a similarly high extent (with about 60% or even more), as Sweden moved from being a poor country in the 1800s to a modern welfare state. We discuss the findings from social inequalities perspectives arguing that disabled people’s partnership chances not only represent how potential partners perceive disability; these chances also reflect general attitudes in society towards disability that work to compromise disabled people’s participation in social life and society. Our long-term results uncover a remarkable persistence in the relationship between disability and partnership in turn suggesting that social inequalities persist being associated with disability in spite of profound structural changes and extensive welfare measures in Sweden to create a more equal society for all.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2022
National Category
History
Research subject
Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192532 (URN)10.4324/9780429470059-14 (DOI)978-1-138-60150-5 (ISBN)978-1-032-16351-2 (ISBN)978-0-429-47005-9 (ISBN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2022-02-16Bibliographically approved
Vikström, L., Junkka, J., Namatovu, F., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Karhina, K. (2021). A longitudinal study of how disability affects mortality in Swedish Populations from the 1800s, 1900s and 2000s. Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of how disability affects mortality in Swedish Populations from the 1800s, 1900s and 2000s
Show others...
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Studies from across the world show that disability limits people’s health and social wellbeing in present-day populations. This disadvantage can lead to premature death, but there is dearth knowledge about the relationship between disability and mortality and changes over time.   

OBJECTIVES: Unique access to longitudinal micro data on comprehensive Swedish populations enabled us to examine how disability affects premature death in men and women from the 1800s until 2010. 

METHODS: Cox proportional regressions were used to estimate mortality hazards by disability status, gender and socio-economic indicators in three study populations from the 1800s, 1900s and 2000s. We followed all adults having disability from age 25 to compare their premature death risks (< age 43) relative to non-disabled groups.

RESULTS: Irrespective of gender and century studied, the adjusted hazard ratios show that adults with disabilities had a significantly higher premature death risk relative to adults without disabilities, and it increased over time. In the 1800s, disability about doubled this risk (HR: 2.31, CI: 1.65–3.22) and it tripled from 1900–1959 (HR 3.01, CI 2.60– 3.48). At the turn of the 21th century, the mortality risk was almost ten-folded (HR 9.90, CI 8.03–10.5). 

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first comprehensive estimates on how disability increased mortality in Swedish populations from the 1800s until the 2000s. Across three centuries, disability was associated with a profoundly higher relative death risk in adults aged 25–42. This risk grew when the general survival in Sweden improved and it was the highest in the 1990–2010 period. Fundamental societal changes and extensive welfare provisions promoting equality in gender, health and social wellbeing of all citizens have not come to include younger generations with disabilities. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2021. p. 34
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 18
Keywords
Death, Disability, Health, Life course, Mortality, Sweden
National Category
History Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Historical Demography; Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186866 (URN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2021-08-24 Created: 2021-08-24 Last updated: 2021-08-27Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, L., Junkka, J., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2021). Ambient temperature and stillbirth risks in northern Sweden, 1880–1950. Environmental Epidemiology, 5(6), Article ID e176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambient temperature and stillbirth risks in northern Sweden, 1880–1950
2021 (English)In: Environmental Epidemiology, ISSN 2474-7882, Vol. 5, no 6, article id e176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Climate vulnerability of the unborn can contribute to adverse birth outcomes, in particular, but it is still not well under-stood. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and stillbirth risk among a historical population in northern Sweden (1880–1950).

Methods: We used digitized parish records and daily temperature data from the study region covering coastal and inland communi-ties some 600 km north of Stockholm, Sweden. The data included 141,880 births, and 3,217 stillbirths, corresponding to a stillbirth rate of 22.7 (1880–1950). The association between lagged temperature (0–7 days before birth) and stillbirths was estimated using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Incidence risk ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals were computed, and stratified by season and sex.

Results: We observed that the stillbirth risk increased both at low and high temperatures during the extended summer season (April to September), at −10°C, and the IRR was 2.3 (CI 1.28, 4.00) compared to the minimum mortality temperature of +15°C. No clear effect of temperature during the extended winter season (October to March) was found. Climate vulnerability was greater among the male fetus compared to the female counterparts.

Conclusion: In this subarctic setting before and during industrialization, both heat and cold during the warmer season increased the stillbirth risk. Urbanization and socio-economic development might have contributed to an uneven decline in climate vulnerability of the unborn.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2021
Keywords
Stillbirth, Ambient temperature, Seasonality, Environment, Climate vulnerability, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Epidemiology; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-189202 (URN)10.1097/EE9.0000000000000176 (DOI)000784743400005 ()34909556 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144816445 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2021-11-08 Created: 2021-11-08 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Junkka, J., Lena, K., Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2021). Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880–1950. Environmental Research, 192, Article ID 110400.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880–1950
2021 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 192, article id 110400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high.Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomicfactors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatalmortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.

Methods: Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Vasterbotten, ¨ Sweden, between 1880 and 1950were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjustingfor age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function wasapplied with a cut point at 14.5 ◦C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800–1899, 1900–1929,and 1930–1950).

Results: Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 ◦C, ranging from − 40.9 ◦Cto +28.8 ◦C. At − 20 ◦C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30–1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 ◦C.Among girls, the OR of mortality at − 20 ◦C was 1.17 (0.88–1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53–2.45). Atemperature increase from +14.5 to +20 ◦C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25,CI 1.04–1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.

Conclusions: In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time andwas particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complexand highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants ofvulnerability. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Climate vulnerability, Ambient temperature, Neonatal mortality, Sweden, Demographic transition
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-177264 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2020.110400 (DOI)000599687100009 ()3129863 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85094559994 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-03 Created: 2020-12-03 Last updated: 2021-05-10Bibliographically approved
Junkka, J., Vikström, L. & Häggström Lundevaller, E. (2021). Healthy migrant perspectives on disability and mobility in a nineteenth-century population.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy migrant perspectives on disability and mobility in a nineteenth-century population
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The strong association between weak health and immobility suggests why there is insufficient knowledge on how disability affects human migration, historically and today. Swedish parish registers digitized by the Demographic Data Base (DDB), Umeå University, enable this study to investigate a 19th-century population of more than 35,000 including a group long hidden in research and society because of disability. First, rates and regressions demonstrate that disability impeded the migration of both men and women albeit with variations by disability type and over time. During industrialisation the overall migration risk was increasing, but not in case of disability. Second, spatial analysis shows that disability limited the distance migrants crossed, especially in the pre-industrial period and among women. During industrial time, migrants’ distance and destinations became less determined by disability. We address healthy migrant perspectives and lock-in mechanisms to discuss the disability differences in migration.

Publisher
p. 31
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2021:19
Keywords
Disability, healthy migrant, life course, migration, mobility, nineteenth-century, Sweden
National Category
History
Research subject
Historical Demography; Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186973 (URN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2021-08-27 Created: 2021-08-27 Last updated: 2021-08-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1527-279x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications