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Broström, Göran
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Publications (10 of 62) Show all publications
Broström, G. & Bengtsson, T. (2023). A hazards approach to the biometric analysis of infant mortality. Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A hazards approach to the biometric analysis of infant mortality
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A variation of the Bourgeois-Pichat biometric analysis of infant mortality is suggested. In the original model, cumulative mortality in the last eleven months of infancy is assumed to follow a uniform distribution given a log-cube transformation of age. Instead, we assume an exponential distribution. The difference is that while the denominator is constant in the Bourgeois-Pichat model, equal to the number of births, in our model, the denominator is the current population at risk. We argue that our assumption is more satisfactory from a theoretical point of view, since it focus on the conditional probability of dying. Our model gives different estimates of endogenous and exogenous mortality and, in addition, the model fit is slightly better, especially in cases with higher levels of infant mortality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2023. p. 15
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2023:27
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
demography; demometry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-213674 (URN)
Available from: 2023-08-26 Created: 2023-08-26 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Broström, G. (2021). Event history analysis with R (2ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Event history analysis with R
2021 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With an emphasis on social science applications, Event History Analysis with R, Second Edition, presents an introduction to survival and event history analysis using real-life examples. Since publication of the first edition, focus in the field has gradually shifted towards the analysis of large and complex datasets. This has led to new ways of tabulating and analysing tabulated data with the same precision and power as that of an analysis of the full data set. Tabulation also makes it possible to share sensitive data with others without violating integrity.

The new edition extends on the content of the first by both improving on already given methods and introducing new methods. There are two new chapters, Explanatory Variables and Regression, and Register- Based Survival Data Models. The book has been restructured to improve the flow, and there are significant updates to the computing in the supporting R package.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2021. p. 304 Edition: 2
Series
Chapman & Hall/CRC The R Series
Keywords
Survival analysis, Mortality, Fertility, Register based research, Computing
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Research subject
Mathematical Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190434 (URN)10.1201/9780429503764 (DOI)978-1-138-58771-7 (ISBN)978-1-032-12320-2 (ISBN)978-0-429-50376-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-12-15 Created: 2021-12-15 Last updated: 2021-12-29Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S. & Broström, G. (2020). Is high social class always beneficial for survival?: a study of northern Sweden 1801-2013. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is high social class always beneficial for survival?: a study of northern Sweden 1801-2013
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Focusing on two regions in northern Sweden 1801–2013, we challenge common notions of the assumed advantage in survival of belonging to a high social class. The issue is analysed according to gender and age group (adults and elderly) and in relation to the development of economic inequality. The results show that high social class is not always favourable for survival. Men in the elite category, particularly in working age, had higher mortality compared to others during a large part of the studied period; a male mortality class reversal appears at a surprisingly late date, while the social gradient among women conforms to the expected pattern. We suggest that health-related behaviour is decisive not only in later but earlier phases of the mortality transition as well. The results implicate that the association between social class and health is more complex than is assumed in many of the dominant theories in demography and epidemiology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2020. p. 33
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2020:2
Keywords
Class reversal in mortality; Gender differences; Inverse probability weighting; Mortality transition; Restricted mean survival time.
National Category
History
Research subject
Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174805 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-892
Available from: 2020-09-08 Created: 2020-09-08 Last updated: 2020-09-21Bibliographically approved
Broström, G., Edvinsson, S., Dribe, M. & Eriksson, B. (2019). Social class and sex-specific adult mortality during 200 years in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at The Annual Meeting of the Social Science and History Association, Chicago, November 21-24, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social class and sex-specific adult mortality during 200 years in Sweden
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent regional studies on adult mortality and socio-economic status inSweden are merged and also completed with analyses from country-widecensuses in strategic time periods, with the purpose to find out whetherthe locally drawn conclusions about a changing social gradient in mortalitystill holds.The answer is firmly positive: While the upper classes have definiteadvantage in modern time (after, say, the 1960s), the reverse situationholds during the nineteenth and early twentieth century for men. Women, onthe other hand, seem to follow the expected pattern of a positive socialgradient through the last 200 years.

Keywords
Adult mortality; Gender differences; Social gradient; Survival analysis
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-172625 (URN)
Conference
The Annual Meeting of the Social Science and History Association, Chicago, November 21-24, 2019
Available from: 2020-06-22 Created: 2020-06-22 Last updated: 2024-07-05Bibliographically approved
Broström, G. (2019). The semi-supercentenarian mortality plateau in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at The 21st Nordic Demographic Symposium, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 13-15, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The semi-supercentenarian mortality plateau in Sweden
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Two research questions are answered: (i) Is human life unlimited?, and (ii) Are there any differences in survival at extreme age between women and men, or between different socioeconomic groups? Mortality above the age of 105 years is studied. The answer to the first question is Yes, and to the second question the answer is No.

National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-172631 (URN)
Conference
The 21st Nordic Demographic Symposium, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 13-15, 2019
Available from: 2020-06-22 Created: 2020-06-22 Last updated: 2020-06-23Bibliographically approved
Broström, G. (2018). The effect of socioeconomic status on marital fertility during the demographic transition, northern Sweden 1821--1950: Efficient data analysis with process point of view. In: : . Paper presented at 41st Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America: Denver, April 26-28, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of socioeconomic status on marital fertility during the demographic transition, northern Sweden 1821--1950: Efficient data analysis with process point of view
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The impact of the family's socioeconomic status at marriage on later child births during the demographic transition (1821--1950) is studied. It is found that the fertility decline starts in the upper classes in the decades prior to 1900. The farmers are characterized by relatively high fertility in high ages even in the end of the study period. A stopping behavior seems to dominate a spacing one, especially along cohorts. The effect of declining infant mortality over time is minor. We show how efficient statistical modeling leads to easy and fast estimation of rather complicated data. The tools are statistical sufficiency and data reduction combined with models for fertility behavior, stopping and spacing.

National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173128 (URN)
Conference
41st Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America: Denver, April 26-28, 2018
Available from: 2020-06-29 Created: 2020-06-29 Last updated: 2020-06-30Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S. & Broström, G. (2017). Life course and long-term perspectives of social inequality in mortality among elderly and adults in Northern Sweden 1801–2013. In: : . Paper presented at IUSSP XXVIII, 2017 International Population Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 29 October – 4 November 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life course and long-term perspectives of social inequality in mortality among elderly and adults in Northern Sweden 1801–2013
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We investigate the development of social inequality in Swedish mortality over the life course in the elderly and adult population during the mortality transition. The study focuses on two main questions, the first relate to the long-term change in social differences in mortality. The second question is whether socio-economic position have less impact on the elderly population compared to population in working age and if the age pattern of social inequalities has changed from the 19th century to the present. Furthermore, in this study we consider possible gender-specific patterns in this process. The development of mortality in different social classes is analysed according to both total mortality and major cause-of-death categories. For the later periods, we also compare the results from the class-based analysis with other measures of social position, in this case income and education. Focus is on mortality in the Skellefteå and Umeå regions in northern Sweden 1851-2013. The study is based on the historical population data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University and modern population register data from Statistics Sweden.

Keywords
Adult mortality, old age mortality, social inequality, northern Sweden
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Population studies; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141173 (URN)
Conference
IUSSP XXVIII, 2017 International Population Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 29 October – 4 November 2017
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2008-6592Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-892
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2021-05-11Bibliographically approved
Broström, G. (2016). The effect of socioeconomic status on marital fertility during the demographic transition, northern Sweden 1821–1950. In: : . Paper presented at 41st Annual Meeting of the Social Science History Association: Chicago, November 17–20, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of socioeconomic status on marital fertility during the demographic transition, northern Sweden 1821–1950
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The impact of the family’s socioeconomic status at marriage on later child births during thedemographic transition (1821–1950) is studied. It is found that the fertility decline starts inthe upper classes in the decades prior to 1900. The farmers are characterized by relativelyhigh fertility in high ages even in the end of the study period.A stopping behavior seems to dominate a spacing one, especially along cohorts. The effectof declining infant mortality over time is minor.

National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173134 (URN)
Conference
41st Annual Meeting of the Social Science History Association: Chicago, November 17–20, 2016
Available from: 2020-06-29 Created: 2020-06-29 Last updated: 2020-06-30Bibliographically approved
Norberg, M., Malmberg, G., Ng, N. & Broström, G. (2015). Use of moist smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of development of alcohol dependence: a cohort study in a middle-aged population in Sweden.. Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 149, 151-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of moist smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of development of alcohol dependence: a cohort study in a middle-aged population in Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 149, p. 151-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Convincing evidence shows that smoking is associated with alcohol dependence (AD) and a positive correlation between snus and alcohol consumption was previously shown in cross-sectional studies. We performed a longitudinal evaluation of the risk of snus users to develop AD.

METHODS: A cohort study in Västerbotten County, Sweden, linked individual data on socioeconomic situation and health survey data from 21,037 men and women (46.5% men). AD was defined by the CAGE questionnaire and evaluated at baseline 1991-1997 and again after 10 years. The risk of developing AD was assessed using logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching.

RESULTS: 2370 men and 430 women used snus and were without AD at baseline. Over the 10-year period, 499 men and 257 women developed AD, among whom 191 and 26, respectively, were baseline snus users. The crude relative risks of AD for male and female snus users compared to non-users were 1.8 with 95% CI (1.5, 2.2) and 2.9 (2.0, 4.3), respectively. Adjusted logistic regression showed a positive dose-response relationship between snus use and risk of AD. Analyses involving propensity score matching revealed 33 and 17 new cases of AD in men and women, respectively, after 10 years given 1000 men and 1000 women without AD had been baseline snus users rather than non-users. Results for current, previous and never smokers were similar.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of snus is prospectively associated with an increased risk of AD with a dose-response relationship that is independent of smoking status.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101164 (URN)10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.01.042 (DOI)000351799200021 ()25707707 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84926204185 (Scopus ID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Broström, G. (2012). Event history analysis with R (1ed.). Boca Raton: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Event history analysis with R
2012 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With an emphasis on social science applications, Event History Analysis with R presents an introduction to survival and event history analysis using real-life examples. Keeping mathematical details to a minimum, the book covers key topics, including both discrete and continuous time data, parametric proportional hazards, and accelerated failure times.

Features:

  • Introduces parametric proportional hazards models with baseline distributions like the Weibull, Gompertz, Lognormal, and Piecewise constant hazard distributions, in addition to traditional Cox regression
  • Presents mathematical details as well as technical material in an appendix
  • Includes real examples with applications in demography, econometrics, and epidemiology
  • Provides a dedicated R package, eha, containing special treatments, including making cuts in the Lexis diagram, creating communal covariates, and creating period statistics

A much-needed primer, Event History Analysis with R is a didactically excellent resource for students and practitioners of applied event history and survival analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2012. p. 216 Edition: 1
Series
Chapman & Hall/CRC The R Series
Keywords
Event history analysis, survival analysis
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Research subject
Mathematical Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55467 (URN)10.1201/9781315373942 (DOI)2-s2.0-85146403647 (Scopus ID)9781439831649 (ISBN)9781439831670 (ISBN)9781315373942 (ISBN)
Note

eBook published 2016.

Available from: 2012-05-16 Created: 2012-05-16 Last updated: 2023-01-30Bibliographically approved
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