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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Olofsson, J., Fors Connolly, F., Malmberg, G., Josefsson, M. & Stattin, M. (2023). Sociodemographic factors and adjustment of daily activities during the COVID-19 pandemic – findings from the SHARE Corona Survey. Journal of Aging & Social Policy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sociodemographic factors and adjustment of daily activities during the COVID-19 pandemic – findings from the SHARE Corona Survey
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Aging & Social Policy, ISSN 0895-9420, E-ISSN 1545-0821Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, older people across Europe have adjusted their daily activities as personal risk avoidance and as an amendment to policy recommendations and restrictions. In this study, we use multilevel logistic regressions to examine to what extent sociodemographic factors are associated with activity reduction among the older population (50+) in Europe and whether these associations are moderated by governmental policy responses to COVID-19. By combining data for~35,000 respondents from the SHARE Corona Survey on reported changes in daily activities and stringency of restrictions at the national level, we find that older age, poorer health and being female versus male were (consistently) associated with greater activity reduction across all activities both in countries with weak and in those with strong restrictions. Associations between education, employment and living situation, on the one hand, and activity reduction, on the other, were weaker and less consistent. We conclude that differences between sociodemographic groups are rather similar for countries with weak and those with strong restrictions and hence argue that group-specific policy recommendation are relevant independent of stringency recommendations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Activity adjustment, COVID-19, cross-national comparisons, daily activities, Europe, government response stringency, SHARE Corona Survey
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-202459 (URN)10.1080/08959420.2023.2206077 (DOI)000979698800001 ()37125862 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85158868645 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 676536EU, Horizon 2020, 101015924
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2024-07-02
Brydsten, A., Hasselgren, C., Stattin, M. & Larsson, D. (2023). The road to retirement: A life course perspective on labor market trajectories and retirement behaviors. Work, Aging and Retirement
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The road to retirement: A life course perspective on labor market trajectories and retirement behaviors
2023 (English)In: Work, Aging and Retirement, ISSN 2054-4642, E-ISSN 2054-4650Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

While a prolonged working life has been mainly feasible for people with the most advantageous working careers, knowledge about the barriersfor those with vulnerable occupational paths is still scarce. This study explores the conditions for prolonged working life from a perspective onlabor market trajectories. Drawing from a gendered life course perspective and that (dis)advantageous tends to accumulate over time, we investigatethe opportunity structure for the most disadvantaged workers and which characteristics of labor market trajectories can explain thedecision to work longer. To this end, a Swedish longitudinal survey and register data from the Panel Survey of Ageing and the Elderly (PSAE)were used, following people across a substantial part of their working life. With sequence analysis, we identified 5 trajectories that representtypical labor market trajectories from mid-life until retirement age. Our findings showed that labor market precarity in mid-life remained a keycharacteristic until the expected retirement age, showing both early signs of early labor market exit and a precarity trap into a prolonged workinglife. These findings emphasize the need to identify at-risk groups early in their careers and that mid-life interventions are needed to prevent involuntarylabor market exits and to ensure a sustainable working life. In particular, the need to protect older workers with turbulent or precariouslabor market trajectories against labor market risks and retirement schemes that could inadvertently contribute to increased social and economicinequality in later life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
careers, retirement, gender, inequality, longitudinal data analysis
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214639 (URN)10.1093/workar/waad024 (DOI)
Projects
Strategier för ett hållbart arbetsliv ur ett arbetsgivar- och medarbetarperspektiv
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2021-01566
Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2023-11-30
Stattin, M. & Bengs, C. (2022). Leaving early or staying on?: Retirement preferences and motives among older health-care professionals. Ageing & Society, 42(12), 2805-2831
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaving early or staying on?: Retirement preferences and motives among older health-care professionals
2022 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2805-2831Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for improved knowledge about how workplace conditions and organisational factors may obstruct or facilitate work in late life. By means of both quantitative and qualitative data, this study aims to explore retirement preferences among employees (aged 55 and older) in a large Swedish health-care organisation and to identify work-related motives influencing their retirement preferences. The quantitative analysis showed large variation in retirement preferences in the organisation. The qualitative results were  summarised into two overarching types of motives for late and early retirement preferences, general and group-specific. The general motives were shared by the early and late preferencegroups, and included recognition, flexibility, health and work motivation. The groupspecificmotives were exclusively related to either an early or a late retirement preference. Criticism towards the organisation and strenuous working conditions were specific motives for an early retirement preference, while positive accounts of work and a wish to utilise one’s own competencies as well as being financially dependent on work was stated as specific motives for wanting to retire late. The results illustrate the need to improve organisational practices and routines, as well as working conditions, in order to make an extended working life accessible for more than already-privileged groups of employees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2022
Keywords
retirement preferences, timing of retirement, older workers, health care, extended working life
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181758 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X2100026X (DOI)000742523800001 ()2-s2.0-85102928807 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-04557Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2056
Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Fors Connolly, F., Olofsson, J., Malmberg, G. & Stattin, M. (2021). Adjustment of daily activities to restrictions and reported spread of the COVID-19 pandemic across Europe.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adjustment of daily activities to restrictions and reported spread of the COVID-19 pandemic across Europe
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses adjustments of daily activities in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic among people aged 50 years and older in Europe, and investigates the extent to which such adjustments are associated with the stringency of governmental restrictions and the overall spread of COVID-19. We use data from the SHARE Corona Survey collected during summer2020, published data on government response stringency, and reported country-specific prevalence and mortality of COVID-19. Our analyses show that older Europeans across the continent have reduced their daily activities quite substantially during the pandemic. However, we observe variation across countries and demographic groups, which may be important to highlight for policymakers. Our explanatory analysis replicates previous studies using mobility data, showing that both restrictions and infections predict a reduction in mobility. Thus, policymakers could potentially rely on both restrictions and voluntary adjustments in order to decrease the spread of the virus. However, it is noteworthy that we find relatively weaker associations with restrictions compared to previous studies using mobility data. One explanation for this discrepancy could be that our study focuses on older people, who face a higher risk of becoming severely ill and therefore have stronger incentives to adjust their behaviours independent of governmental regulations.

Publisher
p. 15
Series
SHARE Working Papers ; 62-2021
Keywords
daily activities, activity adjustment, COVID-19, government response stringency, reported COVID -19 cases, cross-national comparisons, SHARE
National Category
Social Sciences Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Human Geography
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181612 (URN)10.17617/2.3292885 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-03-18 Created: 2021-03-18 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Nordlund, M., Larsson, D. & Stattin, M. (2021). Disability benefits and work reconsidered: is work really good for people with disabilities?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability benefits and work reconsidered: is work really good for people with disabilities?
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: In this study we ask if employment is beneficial for people with disabilities (psychiatric respectively musculoskeletal diagnoses). We set out two hypotheses: 1) Disabled people with an employment report better health than those without employment. 2) Work conditions affect the extent to whichwork benefits the health.

METHODS: We used longitudinal data, the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions 2002/03 and 2010/11. The number of respondents were 1925 including both people with diagnoses and a control group without any diagnosis. Linear Probability Models were regressed to identify variations between disability groups, as regards the correlation between paid work and self-reported health.

RESULTS: People with diagnoses seemed to benefit from employment, and this was particularly evident for people with psychiatric diagnoses. The effect was also stronger in subjects with severe symptoms from their diagnosis. This may be because people with severe symptoms are more affected by their illnesses, and therefore gain more from participation in everyday activities. Having a job can work as an important source to fulfill various psychosocial needs. Further, experiences of poorer work environments tended to be associated with lower levels of health. This result is important given the trend that policies might result in that disabled people are forced to engage in work activities in order to receive benefits, irrespective of their work preferences.

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the policy aim to involve the disabled in paid work is appropriate for improving health but policies should be more flexible in relation to individual needs of the disabled.

Publisher
p. 19
Series
CEDAR Working Papers ; 2021:16
Keywords
Employment, psychiatric, musculoskeletal, diagnosis, work environment, disability policy, working conditions
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186381 (URN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125
Available from: 2021-07-26 Created: 2021-07-26 Last updated: 2021-07-26Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, M., Stattin, M., Robroek, S. J., Burdorf, A. & Järvholm, B. (2021). Industry mobility and disability benefits in heavy manual jobs: A cohort study of swedish construction workers. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 47(3), 217-223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industry mobility and disability benefits in heavy manual jobs: A cohort study of swedish construction workers
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2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate whether change from the construction industry to work in other industries at age 45–55 years lowered risks of disability benefits (DB) later in life (60–64 years of age). We hypothesized that risks would be lowered the most among those changing from the heaviest occupations.

Methods: The study included men employed in the construction industry during 1971–1993. We selected workers from the largest occupational groups in heavy (concrete workers and painters) and less heavy (drivers, electricians and foremen) occupations. The occurrence of DB in 1990–2015 was retrieved from national registers. Regression analyses were used to calculate relative risks (RR) of DB at 60–64 years, comparing those working in other industries to those still in the construction industry at the age of 45, 50 and 55 years.

Results: Mobility away from the construction industry was related to lowered DB risks at 60–64 years in all selected occupations. Effects were most pronounced among those who, at 55 years of age, worked in an industry other than construction, with significantly reduced RR for DB among concrete workers [RR 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51–0.77], electricians (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47–0.77) and foremen (RR 0.78, 95% 0.63–0.96).

Conclusions: Risks for DB at 60–64 years of age were reduced among those who changed from construction work to other industries. Notable reductions were observed among workers originating from both heavy and less heavy occupations, and future studies should explore other factors, in addition to heavy workload, as motivators for leaving the construction industry.

Keywords
Construction industry, Heavy work, Sweden, Work ability
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186216 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3932 (DOI)000636639200007 ()33165622 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85103683973 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-01532
Available from: 2021-07-16 Created: 2021-07-16 Last updated: 2022-04-29Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, R., Hasselgren, C., Dellve, L., Seldén, D., Larsson, D. & Stattin, M. (2021). Matching the Pieces: The Presence of IdiosyncraticDeals and Their Impact on Retirement PreferencesAmong Older Workers. Work, Aging and Retirement, 7(3), 240-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Matching the Pieces: The Presence of IdiosyncraticDeals and Their Impact on Retirement PreferencesAmong Older Workers
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2021 (English)In: Work, Aging and Retirement, ISSN 2054-4642, E-ISSN 2054-4650, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 240-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite working life prolongation having been at the center of the policy agenda in Europe for the last two decades,organizations’ engagement in formal age-management activities intended to strengthen older workers’ motivationand work ability appears limited. Given policies to extend working lives, negotiated individualized work arrange-ments—often called idiosyncratic deals (I-deals)—can be an informal and complementary approach to formal-ized age-management practices, improving the person–job fit and helping older workers extend their working lives.Nevertheless, research on I-deals and retirement preferences remains scarce in the Nordic context, where collectiveagreements regulate conditions of employment and the employer–employee relationship. Using confirmatory factoranalysis and structural equation modeling, this study examines five areas of I-deals (i.e., Task and Work Responsibilities,Workload Reduction, Schedule Flexibility, Location Flexibility, and Financial Incentives) and their relationships with re-tirement preferences among Swedish public-sector employees aged 55 years or older (n = 4,499). Findings show thatI-deals are generally less prevalent among women and older employees, as well as among those with poor health, inlower socioeconomic positions, and with shorter organizational tenure. Regarding retirement preferences, we foundTask and Work Responsibilities to be related to later preferred retirement age, while, surprisingly, the opposite was ob-served for Workload Reduction, probably because individuals who received workload reductions also reported poorerhealth. Comparatively, factors such as matching employees’ competence, experience, and growth opportunities seemto be the most important for public-sector employees’ retirement preferences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186288 (URN)10.1093/workar/waab003 (DOI)000745658400006 ()2-s2.0-85130369271 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Organisatoriska satsningar och individuella överenskommelser: hur motivera äldre till ett förlängt arbetsliv?
Funder
AFA Insurance, 190281
Available from: 2021-07-20 Created: 2021-07-20 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sandström, G., Namatovu, F., Ineland, J., Larsson, D., Ng, N. & Stattin, M. (2021). The Persistence of High Levels of Living Alone Among Adults with Disabilities in Sweden, 1993–2011. Population: Research and Policy Review, 40(2), 163-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Persistence of High Levels of Living Alone Among Adults with Disabilities in Sweden, 1993–2011
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2021 (English)In: Population: Research and Policy Review, ISSN 0167-5923, E-ISSN 1573-7829, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 163-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how the probability to live alone has developed among working age individuals with and without disabilities in Sweden during the period 1993–2011 when extensive political reforms to improve the integration of disabled individuals in society were implemented. The results show that individuals with disabilities are approximately twice as likely to be living alone when compared to individuals without disabilities. People with disabilities were also more likely to report low life satisfaction, and this was especially true among individuals with disabilities living alone. Men and women with disabilities also tend to experience longer periods of living as a one-person household than non-disabled people. Over time we find no indications of reduced differences in family outcomes between disabled and non-disabled individuals but rather evidence to the contrary. These differences are interpreted as being the result of the disadvantage disabled individual’s experience in the partner market and that people with disabilities are less successful in forming partnerships that can lead to cohabitation and family formation. The results thus show how disabled individuals still face societal barriers that limit their possibilities to find and sustain relationships that result in stable cohabitation despite increased efforts to improve their inclusion in Swedish society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Sweden, Disability, Living arrangements, One-person households, Disability legislation
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167923 (URN)10.1007/s11113-020-09570-2 (DOI)000515863100001 ()2-s2.0-85079501680 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DISMAW
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0141
Available from: 2020-02-06 Created: 2020-02-06 Last updated: 2021-07-13Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, M., Mannelqvist, R., Järvholm, B., Schiöler, L. & Stattin, M. (2020). Impact of changes in welfare legislation on the incidence of disability pension. A cohort study of construction workers. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 48(4), 405-411
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of changes in welfare legislation on the incidence of disability pension. A cohort study of construction workers
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2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: Study objectives were to investigate how changes in social insurance legislation influenced the incidence of disability pension.

METHODS: The study included 295,636 male construction workers who attended health examinations between 1971 and 1993, aged 20-60 years and without previous disability pension. Via the Swedish National Insurance Agency national register we identified 66,046 subjects who were granted disability pension up until 2010. The incidence rates were calculated and stratified according to age and diagnosis.

RESULTS: The incidence rate of disability pension was fairly stable until the 1990s when large variations occurred, followed by a strong decreasing trend from the early 2000s to 2010. Trends in incidence rates, stratified by age and diagnosis, showed a consistent decrease in cardiovascular disease for all age groups. In subjects aged 30-49 years there was a high peak around 2003 for musculoskeletal diseases and psychiatric diseases. For the age group 50-59 years, musculoskeletal diagnosis, the most common cause of disability pension, had a sharp peak around 1993 and then a decreasing trend. In the 60-64 age group, the incidence rate for psychiatric diagnosis was stable, while incidence rates for musculoskeletal diagnosis varied during the 1990s.

CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable variations in the incidence rate of disability pension over time, with different patterns depending on age and diagnosis. Changes in social insurance legislation, as well as in administration processes, seem to influence the variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Disability pension, construction workers, social insurance legislation, time trends
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144283 (URN)10.1177/1403494818754747 (DOI)000536910400007 ()29366393 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85085616564 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, M., Schiöler, L., Stattin, M., Burdorf, A. & Järvholm, B. (2020). Mortality in persons with disability pension due to common mental disorders: A cohort study of Swedish construction workers. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health (8), 832-838
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality in persons with disability pension due to common mental disorders: A cohort study of Swedish construction workers
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2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, no 8, p. 832-838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study investigated mortality in disability pensions due to common mental disorder, and variation over time after first receiving disability pension. Methods: Objectives were explored in 301,863 construction workers (97.2% men) recruited through healthcare examinations from 1971-1993. By linking with the Swedish National Insurance Agency registers, disability pensions until 2014 were identified. Common mental disorder was defined as disability pension diagnosis due to anxiety, stress-related disorders or moderate depression. Mortality was calculated in all-psychiatric diagnosis and diagnostic sub-groups, and compared to persons without disability pensions, using Poisson regression. Additional analyses were stratified by age at follow-up. Results: In total 6030 subjects received disability pensions based on psychiatric diagnoses, and 2624 constituted common mental disorder. Analyses in an all-psychiatric diagnosis displayed increased mortality risks in men (relative risk 3.6; 95% confidence interval 3.3-3.9) and women (relative risk 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.6-2.6). Common mental disorder was associated with mortality, especially in men (relative risk 2.5; 95% confidence interval 2.2-2.8). Increased relative risks in alcohol and substance abuse were also observed. Results in analyses stratified by age at follow-up displayed persistent high relative risks for mortality in older ages (75-89 years) in men in all-psychiatric disability pensions diagnosis (relative risk 2.8; 95% confidence interval 2.1-3.7) and common mental disorder diagnosis (relative risk 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.8-3.6), compared to men without disability pensions. Similar results were found in women, but few cases lowered the precision of estimates. Conclusions: This study shows that disability pension based on common mental disorders, often regarded as a 'lighter' psychiatric diagnosis, is a risk for early mortality in construction workers, even several years after first receiving disability pension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Disability pension, common mental disorders, construction workers, mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166527 (URN)10.1177/1403494819884440 (DOI)000501951900001 ()31820671 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077368042 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Projects
Ageing: Keys to a longer work career. Individual and organizational perspectives [2014-04557_Forte]; Umeå UniversityExtending working life - an international perspective [2015-01383_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0817-0576

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