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Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Hasselquist, E. M., Kuglerová, L., Sjögren, J., Hjältén, J., Ring, E., Sponseller, R. A., . . . Laudon, H. (2021). Moving towards multi-layered, mixed-species forests in riparian buffers will enhance their long-term function in boreal landscapes. Forest Ecology and Management, 493, Article ID 119254.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving towards multi-layered, mixed-species forests in riparian buffers will enhance their long-term function in boreal landscapes
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2021 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 493, article id 119254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Riparian buffers are the primary tool in forest management for protecting the habitat structure and function of streams. They help protect against biogeochemical perturbation, filter sediments and nutrients, prevent erosion, contribute food to aquatic organisms, regulate light and hence water temperature, contribute deadwood, and preserve biodiversity. However, in production forests of Sweden and Finland, many headwater streams have been straightened, ditched, and/or channelized, resulting in altered hydrology and reduced natural disturbance by floods, which in turn affects important riparian functions. Furthermore, in even-aged management systems as practiced in much of Fennoscandia, understory trees have usually been cleared right up to the stream’s edge during thinning operations, especially around small, headwater streams. Fire suppression has further favored succession towards shade tolerant species. In the regions within Fennoscandia that have experienced this combination of intensive management and lack of natural disturbance, riparian zones are now dominated by single-storied, native Norway spruce. When the adjacent forest is cut, thin (5 - 15m) conifer-dominated riparian buffers are typically left. These buffers do not provide the protection and subsidies, in terms of leaf litter quality, needed to maintain water quality or support riparian or aquatic biodiversity. Based on a literature review, we found compelling evidence that the ecological benefits of multi-layered, mixed-species riparian forest with a large component of broadleaved species are higher than what is now commonly found in the managed stands of Fennoscandia. To improve the functionality of riparian zones, and hence the protection of streams in managed forest landscapes, we present some basic principles that could be used to enhance the ecological function of these interfaces. These management actions should be prioritized on streams and streamside stands that have been affected by simplification either through forest management or hydrological modification. Key to these principles is the planning and managing of buffer zones as early as possible in the rotation to ensure improved function throughout the rotation cycle and not only at final felling. This is well in line with EU and national legislation which can be interpreted as requiring landscape planning at all forest ages to meet biodiversity and other environmental goals. However, it is still rare that planning for conservation is done other than at the final felling stage. Implementing this new strategy is likely to have long-term positive effects and improve the protection of surface waters from negative forestry effects and a history of fire suppression. By following these suggested management principles, there will be a longer time period with high function and greater future management flexibility in addition to the benefits provided by leaving riparian buffers at the final felling stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
boreal, broadleaf, continuous cover forestry, deciduous, forest planning, retention forestry, uneven-aged forestry
National Category
Ecology Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182832 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2021.119254 (DOI)000651205800008 ()2-s2.0-85105699426 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-00723
Available from: 2021-05-06 Created: 2021-05-06 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Kuglerova, L., Botkova, K. & Jansson, R. (2017). Responses of riparian plants to habitat changes following restoration of channelized streams. Ecohydrology, 10(1), Article ID e1798.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responses of riparian plants to habitat changes following restoration of channelized streams
2017 (English)In: Ecohydrology, ISSN 1936-0584, E-ISSN 1936-0592, Vol. 10, no 1, article id e1798Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ecological effects of stream restoration were evaluated by comparing riparian vegetation, flooding, and habitat properties between channelized and two types of restored streams in northern Sweden. Channelized streams were straightened and cleared of in-stream boulders and wood >50 years ago to facilitate timber floating. Basic restoration (performed 8-10 years ago) returned cleared material back to the channels, and enhanced restoration (3 years ago) added large structural elements (boulders and downed trees) to previously basic-restored streams. Riparian inundation duration increased only after enhanced restoration. Similarly, enhanced-restored reaches had the highest amount of substrate available for plant establishment compared to channelized and basic-restored streams. In contrast, soil biochemical properties (pH and C:N ratio) did not improve following either restoration effort. Riparian plant cover was higher at both restored types than channelized reaches. Plant species richness was higher at plot-scale level (0.25 m(2)) at both restored types in the most species-rich elevation levels compared to channelized reaches, whereas at the reach-scale (>700 m(2) of riparian area), species richness did not differ among stream types. Similarly, species composition segregated between channelized and restored reaches only at the plot scale. We found no significant differences in riparian vegetation between the two restored types. The lack of positive responses of vegetation to enhanced restoration and to variables that changed immediately after restoration (inundation, habitat area) implies that responses were either slower than expected or the changes in hydrology and substrate availability were not as important for riparian flora as believed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
channelization, flooding, habitat quality and quantity, riparian vegetation, stream restoration, vascular plants
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132835 (URN)10.1002/eco.1798 (DOI)000393870100024 ()2-s2.0-85009250290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-05 Created: 2017-04-05 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Kuglerová, L., Dynesius, M., Laudon, H. & Jansson, R. (2016). Relationships between plant assemblages and water flow across a boreal forest landscape: a comparison of liverworts, mosses, and vascular plants. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 19(1), 170-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between plant assemblages and water flow across a boreal forest landscape: a comparison of liverworts, mosses, and vascular plants
2016 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 170-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The distribution of water across landscapes affects the diversity and composition of ecological communities, as demonstrated by studies on variation in vascular plant communities along river networks and in relation to groundwater. However, nonvascular plants have been neglected in this regard. Bryophytes are dominant components of boreal flora, performing many ecosystem functions and affecting ecosystem processes, but how their diversity and species composition vary across catchments is poorly known. We asked how terrestrial assemblages of mosses and liverworts respond to variation in (i) catchment size, going from upland-forest to riparian settings along increasingly large streams and (ii) groundwater discharge conditions. We compared the patterns found for liverworts and mosses to vascular plants in the same set of study plots. Species richness of vascular plants and mosses increased with catchment size, whereas liverworts peaked along streams of intermediate size. All three taxonomic groups responded to groundwater discharge in riparian zones by maintaining high species richness further from the stream channel. Groundwater discharge thus provided riparian-like habitat further away from the streams and also in upland-forest sites compared to the non-discharge counterparts. In addition, soil chemistry (C:N ratio, pH) and light availability were important predictors of vascular plant species richness. Mosses and liverworts responded to the availability of specific substrates (stones and topographic hollows), but were also affected by soil C: N. Overall, assemblages of mosses and vascular plants exhibited many similarities in how they responded to hydrological gradients, whereas the patterns of liverworts differed from the other two groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2016
Keywords
catchment size, groundwater discharge, liverworts, mosses, riparian zones, river network, species richness, vascular plants
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
biology, Environmental Science; Ecological Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100213 (URN)10.1007/s10021-015-9927-0 (DOI)000373017800013 ()2-s2.0-84955646751 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Kuglerová, L. (2015). Grow with the flow: Hydrological controls of riparian vegetation in boreal stream networks. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå Univeristy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grow with the flow: Hydrological controls of riparian vegetation in boreal stream networks
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

What drives species diversity across landscapes is one of the most fundamental questions in ecology. Further, understanding the mechanisms underlying species diversity patterns is important not only for forming and challenging ecological theories but also essential for appropriate landscape management and effective nature conservation. This thesis focuses on patterns of vascular plant, moss and liverwort species richness and composition in relation to water flow in boreal-forest catchments, focusing mostly on riparian zones (RZs), that is terrestrial areas bordering streams and rivers. I addressed some of the most essential questions related to the ecology of riparian vegetation including the role of stream network position, groundwater (GW) flow paths, substrate availability, upland perturbations, and stream restoration. I also investigated how riparian soil processes and habitat properties relate to these factors in order to provide a holistic understanding of riparian dynamics. The results showed that the species richness and composition of riparian vascular plants, mosses and liverworts are strongly influenced by position along the stream network, GW discharge, presence of variable substrates in RZs, and by stream restoration. Generally, more species were found downstream in the network, at sites with inputs of upland GW, sites with high diversity of substrates (e.g., open mineral soil, rocks, stones, wood and bark), and along streams restored after channelization. This thesis also describes how riparian habitat properties responded to position in the landscape and human impacts, thus providing mechanistic links between plant species diversity and riparian processes across spatial scales. These ecological insights are further implemented into numerous recommendations for freshwater and upland management in boreal Sweden. Given that streams and rivers connect landscape elements both longitudinally and laterally I argue that management plans should be designed for entire catchments instead of individual river segments. Ignoring the connectivity of streams as well as the high connectivity of riparian areas to uplands via GW flows may result in failure of restoration, mitigation and/or protection actions. Further, during forestry operations more emphasis should be placed on GW discharge areas along streams and rivers, because they represent important ecological and biogeochemical hotspots in the landscape. The riparian buffers left along streams in boreal catchments affected by forestry are presently insufficiently wide and often uniform in width. This threatens the assemblages of species in GW discharge hotspots and the ecosystem services they provide. Overall, this thesis describes a holistic picture of riparian diversity patterns and riparian processes in boreal landscapes, acknowledges and elaborates on current ecological theories, presenting new patterns in biodiversity, and offers management guidelines. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Univeristy, 2015. p. 27
Keywords
boreal forest, channelization, groundwater, Krycklan catchment, liverworts, mosses, riparian buffers, riparian vegetation, river restoration, species richness, stream network, stream size, vascular plants
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100217 (URN)978-91-7601-212-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-03-26, Björken, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Skogsmarksgränd 901 83, Umeå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2015-03-05 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kuglerová, L., Jansson, R., Sponseller, R., Laudon, H. & Malm-Renöfält, B. (2015). Local and regional processes determine plant species richness in a river-network metacommunity. Ecology, 96(2), 381-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local and regional processes determine plant species richness in a river-network metacommunity
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2015 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 381-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

River systems form dendritic ecological networks that influence the spatial structure of riverine communities. Few empirical studies have evaluated how regional, dispersal-related processes and local habitat factors interact to govern network patterns of species composition. We explore such interactions in a boreal watershed and show that riparian plant species richness increases strongly with drainage size, i.e., with downstream position in the network. Assemblage composition was nested, with new species successively added downstream. These spatial patterns in species composition were related to a combination of local and regional processes. Breadth in local habitat conditions increased downstream in the network, resulting in higher habitat heterogeneity and reduced niche overlap among species, which together with similar trends in disturbance, allows more species to coexist. Riparian edaphic conditions were also increasingly favorable to more species within the regional pool along larger streams, with greater nitrogen availability (manifested as lower C:N) and more rapid mineralization of C and N (as indicated by ratios of stable isotopes) observed with downstream position in the network. The number of species with capacity for water dispersal increased with stream size providing a mechanistic link between plant traits and the downstream accumulation of species as more propagules arrive from upstream sites. Similarity in species composition between sites was related to both geographical and environmental distance. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that position in the river network drives spatial patterns in riparian plant diversity and composition by the joint influence of local (disturbance, habitat conditions, and breadth) and regional (dispersal) forces.

Keywords
boreal, connectivity, dispersal, disturbance, hydrochory, riparian, river network, soil conditions, spatial organization, vascular plants
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Research subject
biology, Environmental Science; Ecological Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100211 (URN)10.1890/14-0552.1 (DOI)000350484600010 ()2-s2.0-84927914847 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Kuglerova, L., Jansson, R., Ågren, A., Laudon, H. & Malm-Renöfält, B. (2014). Groundwater discharge creates hotspots of riparian plant species richness in a boreal forest stream network. Ecology, 95(3), 715-725
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Groundwater discharge creates hotspots of riparian plant species richness in a boreal forest stream network
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2014 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 95, no 3, p. 715-725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Riparian vegetation research has traditionally focused on channel-related processes because riparian areas are situated on the edge of aquatic ecosystems and are therefore greatly affected by the flow regime of streams and rivers. However, due to their low topographic position in the landscape, riparian areas receive significant inputs of water and nutrients from uplands. These inputs may be important for riparian vegetation, but their role for riparian plant diversity is poorly known. We studied the relationship between the influx of groundwater (GW) from upland areas and riparian plant diversity and composition along a stream size gradient, ranging from small basins lacking permanent streams to a seventh-order river in northern Sweden. We selected riparian sites with and without GW discharge using a hydrological model describing GW flow accumulation to test the hypothesis that riparian sites with GW discharge harbor plant communities with higher species richness. We further investigated several environmental factors to detect habitat differences between sites differing in GW discharge conditions. Vascular plant species richness was between 15% and 20% higher, depending on the spatial scale sampled, at riparian sites with GW discharge in comparison to non-discharge sites, a pattern that was consistent across all stream sizes. The elevated species richness was best explained by higher soil pH and higher nitrogen availability (manifested as lower soil C/N ratio), conditions which were positively correlated with GW discharge. Base cations and possibly nitrogen transported by groundwater may therefore act as a terrestrial subsidy of riparian vegetation. The stable isotopes N-15 and C-13 were depleted in soils from GW discharge compared to non-discharge sites, suggesting that GW inputs might also affect nitrogen and carbon dynamics in riparian soils. Despite the fact that many flows of water and nutrients reaching streams are filtered through riparian zones, the importance of these flows for riparian vegetation has not been appreciated. Our results demonstrated strong relationships between GW discharge, plant species richness and environmental conditions across the entire stream size gradient, suggesting that both river hydrology and upland inputs should be considered to fully understand riparian vegetation dynamics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ecological Society of America, 2014
Keywords
boreal forest, groundwater discharge, Krycklan catchment, riparian zone, soil nitrogen, soil pH, species richness, terrestrial subsidy, vascular plants
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88681 (URN)10.1890/13-0363.1 (DOI)000332823100019 ()2-s2.0-84901638544 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-05-16 Created: 2014-05-12 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Kuglerová, L., Ågren, A., Jansson, R. & Laudon, H. (2014). Towards optimizing riparian buffer zones: Ecological and biogeochemical implications for forest management. Forest Ecology and Management, 334, 74-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards optimizing riparian buffer zones: Ecological and biogeochemical implications for forest management
2014 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 334, p. 74-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Riparian forests (RFs) along streams and rivers in forested landscapes provide many ecosystem functions that are important for the biodiversity and biogeochemistry of both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In riverine landscapes, many of these ecological and biogeochemical functions have been found to be maximized in riparian areas with discharge of upland-originating groundwater (GW). This ecological significance, and the fact that riparian areas with GW discharge are important sources of many chemical elements in streams and rivers, makes these places important hotspots in the landscape. The natural functioning of RFs is however threatened by poorly designed management practices, with forestry being one of the most important examples in timber producing regions. Logging operations in riparian, but also in adjoining upland forests, threaten to alter many riparian functions. This effect is accelerated in GW discharge hotspots because of their sensitive soils and the high connectivity with uphill areas. We thus argue that forestry practices should give higher consideration to riparian GW discharge areas, and we demonstrate how improved riparian buffer zone management can be incorporated into every-day forestry planning. We offer a practical tool for more optimized site-specific riparian buffer design by using model-derived high resolution maps with detailed information about wetness and soil–water flow paths within RFs. We describe how such site-specific riparian buffer management differs from fixed-width buffers, which are generally applied in today’s forestry, and address some risks connected to fixed-width buffer management. We conclude that site-specific riparian management, allowing wider buffers at GW discharge areas and more narrow buffers on sites of lower ecological significance (i.e. riparian sites without GW flow paths), would benefit a variety of ecosystem services, mitigate negative effects caused by forestry and create more variable and heterogeneous riparian corridors. Finally, we show examples of how the new forestry planning can be applied.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Ecosystem functioning, Forestry management, Groundwater discharge, Wetness mapping, Riparian buffers, Riparian hotspots
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97967 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2014.08.033 (DOI)000347739700008 ()2-s2.0-84907783830 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-01-11 Created: 2015-01-11 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, C., Jansson, R., Kuglerova, L., Lind, L. & Ström, L. (2013). Boreal riparian vegetation under climate change. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 16(3), 401-410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boreal riparian vegetation under climate change
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2013 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 401-410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Riparian zones in boreal areas such as humid landscapes on minerogenic soils are characterized by diverse, productive, and dynamic vegetation which will rapidly react to climate change. Climate-change models predict that in most parts of the boreal region these zones will be affected by various combinations of increased temperature, less seasonal variation in runoff, increased average discharge, changes in groundwater supply, and a more dynamic ice regime. Increasing temperatures will favor invasion of exotic species whereas species losses are likely to be minor. The hydrologic changes will cause a narrowing of the riparian zone and, therefore, locally reduce species richness whereas effects on primary production are more difficult to predict. More shifts between freezing and thawing during winter will lead to increased dynamics of ice formation and ice disturbance, potentially fostering a more dynamic and species-rich riparian vegetation. Restoration measures that increase water retention and shade, and that reduce habitats for exotic plant species adjacent to rivers can be applied especially in streams and rivers that have been channelized or deprived of their riparian forest to reduce the effects of climate change on riparian ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: Springer-Verlag New York, 2013
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-73585 (URN)10.1007/s10021-012-9622-3 (DOI)000318999000003 ()2-s2.0-84876328265 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-06-25 Created: 2013-06-25 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Schelker, J., Kuglerová, L., Eklöf, K., Bishop, K. & Laudon, H. (2013). Hydrological effects of clear-cutting in a boreal forest: snowpack dynamics, snowmelt and streamflow responses. Journal of Hydrology, 484, 105-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrological effects of clear-cutting in a boreal forest: snowpack dynamics, snowmelt and streamflow responses
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 484, p. 105-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the effects of forest clear-cutting on snow accumulation, melt dynamics and associated stream responses in a paired catchment experiment in northern Sweden. Two boreal first-order streams, of which one was clear-cut harvested in 2006, were compared during the 2005-2011 study period. Clear-cutting increased snow accumulation expressed as snow water equivalents (SWEs) on average by 29 mm (27%). Further snow melt occurred earlier in the clear-cut resulting in more rapid stream responses of the harvested catchment during some, but not all years (2008, 2009 and 2010). Snowmelt runoff increased by 39% and 27% in the clear-cut (reference = 144 mm and 121 mm) during 2008 and 2009, respectively, whereas no significant difference in runoff was observed during spring 2010 and 2011. The results indicate that stream responses to snowmelt, primarily governed by sensible heat transfer through air temperature, radiation and turbulent heat fluxes, are controlled by three main processes: (i) interception in the forest canopy, reducing SWE; (ii) sublimation directly from the snowpack; and (iii) additional losses of melt water as, for example, evaporation during the melt. The year-to-year variation in these processes determines the stream response to clear-cutting during snowmelt. Overall this study underlines the large inter-annual variation in spring snowmelt responses of managed boreal catchments, which may have hydrological and biochemical implications for downstream locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Snow melt, Variability, Clear-cutting, Forest hydrology, Paired catchment, 277 Balsjö
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71101 (URN)10.1016/j.jhydrol.2013.01.015 (DOI)000317453200011 ()2-s2.0-84875402466 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-06-12 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Kuglerová, L., Botková, K. & Jansson, R.Responses of riparian plants to increases in habitat quantity and quality following restoration of channelized streams.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responses of riparian plants to increases in habitat quantity and quality following restoration of channelized streams
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We evaluated the ecological effects of stream restoration by comparing riparian vascular plant diversity and riparian habitat properties between channelized stream reaches and reaches restored with two different techniques in northern Sweden. Channelized streams were modified >50 years ago to facilitate timber floating which implied straightening and clearing channels from in-stream boulders and wood, which were deposited in riparian areas. Traditionally restored reaches underwent restoration efforts 8-10 years ago when material from the riparian zones was returned back to the channels. Some reaches were re-restored 3 years before our study by bringing large structural elements (boulders and downed trees) to the previously traditionally restored streams. These three restoration types (i.e., channelized, traditionally restored, and re-restored) represent a gradient in habitat complexity and we tested whether they also represent a gradient in plant diversity, and habitat quantity and quality. Riparian plant cover was higher at both restored types than channelized reaches. Responses of riparian plant diversity to restoration were scale dependent, with higher species richness at both restored types than channelized reaches at plot scale level (0.25 m2), whereas at the reach (>700 m2 of riparian area) and transect scales, plant species richness did not differ among the three restoration types. Differences in plots scale richness were largest in the most dynamic and species-rich part of riparian zones, i.e., at 20 and 40 cm elevations above the low summer water levels. We found no systematic differences in plant cover and species richness between the two restored types. Species composition did not differ among the restoration types at the reach scale, but at the plot scale species composition segregated between channelized and restored reaches but with small compositional differences between the traditionally restored and re-restored types. Aspects of both riparian habitat quantity and quality for vascular plants increased after restoration. Riparian zones along re-restored reaches had the highest amount of soils available for plant establishment in comparison to traditionally restored and channelized streams. In contrast, soil quality was more favorable to plants along channelized reaches, with higher soil pH and lower C:N ratio at some riparian levels. The magnitude of floods did not differ between the three types of streams, but inundation duration significantly increased following restoration with the longest inundation events at re-restored reaches. Thus, given that inundation is positively associated with plant species richness in riparian zones, habitat quality may have improved following restoration. We conclude that restoration of channelized streams has improved the abundance and diversity of riparian vascular plants. Given that we observed several positive trajectories in biotic and habitat recovery (although statistically insignificant in some cases) and that the new re-restoration technique is predicted to enhance riparian habitat conditions more effectively than traditional methods, we suggest that with time, further recovery of riparian vegetation may occur.

Keywords
channelization, habitat quality and quantity, riparian vegetation, stream restoration, vascular plants
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
biology, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100216 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3896-8466

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