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Hasslöf, Pamela
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Lif Holgerson, P., Hasslöf, P., Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Domellöf, M., West, C. E. & Johansson, I. (2023). Genetic preference for sweet taste in mothers associates with mother-child preference and intake. Nutrients, 15(11), Article ID 2565.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic preference for sweet taste in mothers associates with mother-child preference and intake
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2023 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 15, no 11, article id 2565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taste perception is a well-documented driving force in food selection, with variations in, e.g., taste receptor encoding and glucose transporter genes conferring differences in taste sensitivity and food intake. We explored the impact of maternal innate driving forces on sweet taste preference and intake and assessed whether their children differed in their intake of sweet foods or traits related to sweet intake. A total of 133 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes reported to associate with eating preferences were sequenced from saliva-DNA from 187 mother-and-child pairs. Preference and intake of sweet-, bitter-, sour-, and umami-tasting foods were estimated from questionnaires. A total of 32 SNP variants associated with a preference for sweet taste or intake at a p-value < 0.05 in additive, dominant major, or dominant minor allele models, with two passing corrections for multiple testing (q < 0.05). These were rs7513755 in the TAS1R2 gene and rs34162196 in the OR10G3 gene. Having the T allele of rs34162196 was associated with higher sweet intake in mothers and their children, along with a higher BMI in mothers. Having the G allele of rs7513755 was associated with a higher preference for sweets in the mothers. The rs34162196 might be a candidate for a genetic score for sweet intake to complement self-reported intakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
NorthPop cohort, mothers with child, single nucleotide polymorphisms, sweet intake, sweet preference, taste
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209775 (URN)10.3390/nu15112565 (DOI)001004952500001 ()37299528 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161404366 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2023-06-13 Created: 2023-06-13 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, P., Granqvist, L., Stecksén-Blicks, C. & Twetman, S. (2022). Prevention of Recurrent Childhood Caries with Probiotic Supplements: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up. Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins, 14, 384-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevention of Recurrent Childhood Caries with Probiotic Supplements: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up
2022 (English)In: Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins, ISSN 1867-1306, E-ISSN 1867-1314, Vol. 14, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of drops containing probiotic bacteria on the recurrence of dental caries in preschool children. The study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded design with two parallel arms. 38 preschool children were enrolled after comprehensive restorative treatment under general anesthesia or conscious sedation (baseline), and they were followed up after 6 and 12 months. Parents of children in the test group were instructed to give 5 daily drops containing two strains of Limosilactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289) at bedtime. The placebo drops were identically composed but lacked bacteria. The duration of the intervention was 12 months. The primary endpoint was recurrence of new caries lesions on subject level (yes/no), and secondary endpoints were presence of dental plaque and gingivitis. We found high rate of recurrent moderate and extensive lesions after 12 months (67%) but there were no significant differences between the groups. We observed no beneficial effects on dental plaque or gingival inflammation. The findings were however uncertain and inconclusive due to lack of power, a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. ClinTrials.gov Identifier: (NCT04929340), June 18, 2021; retrospectively registered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Dental caries, Limosilactobacillus, Preschool children, Probiotic drops
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-192241 (URN)10.1007/s12602-022-09913-9 (DOI)000747078100001 ()35083729 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123592219 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-22 Created: 2022-04-22 Last updated: 2022-04-22Bibliographically approved
Esberg, A., Eriksson, L., Hasslöf, P., Haworth, S., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2021). Using Oral Microbiota Data to Design a Short Sucrose Intake Index. Nutrients, 13(5), Article ID 1400.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Oral Microbiota Data to Design a Short Sucrose Intake Index
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2021 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 1400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Excessive sucrose consumption is associated with numerous health problems, including dental caries, and is considered to play a critical role in shaping the human microbiota. Here, we aimed to confirm the association between sucrose exposure and oral microbiota profile, develop a short food-based index capturing variation among sucrose consumers and validate it against oral microbiota and dental caries in a derivation cohort with 16- to 79-year-old participants (n = 427). Intake and food preferences were recorded by questionnaires and saliva microbiota by 16S rDNA sequencing. Taxonomic similarities clustered participants into five clusters, where one stood out with highest sucrose intake and predicted sugar related metabolic pathways but lowest species diversity in the microbiota. Multivariate modelling of food intake and preferences revealed foods suitable for a sucrose index. This, similarly to sucrose intake, was related to bacterial pattern and caries status. The validity of the sucrose index was replicated in the population-based Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Dental Endpoints (GLIDE, n = 105,520 Swedish adults) cohort. This suggested that the index captured clinically relevant variation in sucrose intake and that FFQ derived information may be suitable for screening of sucrose intake in the clinic and epidemiological studies, although adjustments to local consumption habits are needed.

Keywords
caries, saliva microbiota, sucrose, sucrose index
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182675 (URN)10.3390/nu13051400 (DOI)000662387600001 ()33919427 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85104437409 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-03372Swedish Research Council, 2015-02597Region Västerbotten
Available from: 2021-05-01 Created: 2021-05-01 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Hasslöf, P., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2020). Oral Microbiota Profile Associates with Sugar Intake and Taste Preference Genes. Nutrients, 12(3), Article ID 681.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral Microbiota Profile Associates with Sugar Intake and Taste Preference Genes
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2020 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 681Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oral microbiota ecology is influenced by environmental and host conditions, but few studies have evaluated associations between untargeted measures of the entire oral microbiome and potentially relevant environmental and host factors. This study aimed to identify salivary microbiota cluster groups using hierarchical cluster analyses (Wards method) based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, and identify lifestyle and host factors which were associated with these groups. Group members (n = 175) were distinctly separated by microbiota profiles and differed in reported sucrose intake and allelic variation in the taste-preference-associated genes TAS1R1 (rs731024) and GNAT3 (rs2074673). Groups with higher sucrose intake were either characterized by a wide panel of species or phylotypes with fewer aciduric species, or by a narrower profile that included documented aciduric- and caries-associated species. The inferred functional profiles of the latter type were dominated by metabolic pathways associated with the carbohydrate metabolism with enrichment of glycosidase functions. In conclusion, this study supported in vivo associations between sugar intake and oral microbiota ecology, but it also found evidence for a variable microbiota response to sugar, highlighting the importance of modifying host factors and microbes beyond the commonly targeted acidogenic and acid-tolerant species. The results should be confirmed under controlled settings with comprehensive phenotypic and genotypic data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
16S rDNA sequencing, genes, microbiota, saliva, sugar, taste
National Category
Dentistry Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168730 (URN)10.3390/nu12030681 (DOI)000531831000090 ()32138214 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85081028094 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, P. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2020). Probiotic bacteria and dental caries. In: Zohoori F.V., Duckworth R.M. (Ed.), The Impact of Nutrition and Diet on Oral Health: (pp. 99-107). Basel: S. Karger (28)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotic bacteria and dental caries
2020 (English)In: The Impact of Nutrition and Diet on Oral Health / [ed] Zohoori F.V., Duckworth R.M., Basel: S. Karger, 2020, no 28, p. 99-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The World Health Organization has defined probiotics as “Live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host.” Traditionally, probiotic microorganisms (mainly Lactobacillus ssp. and Bifidobacterium ssp.) have been used to prevent or treat diseases in the gastrointestinal tract. In the past 20 years, there has been an increased interest in possible oral health effects of probiotics. In vitro studies have shown promising results with growth inhibition of mutans streptococci (MS) and Candida albicans. There are only a few clinical studies with caries development as the primary outcome while more studies have been focusing on control of caries risk factors or so-called surrogate outcomes. Several studies have evaluated the effects of probiotic bacteria on MS in saliva and/or plaque, and a number of probiotic strains show ability to reduce the number of MS. Probiotic bacteria have not been shown to permanently colonize the oral cavity; in early-in-life interventions or in subjects with a mature microbiota. To date investigated strains are transiently present in saliva during and shortly after an intervention. There are eight randomized controlled clinical trials with dental caries as outcome and probiotic strains, administration, duration of the intervention, and target group varied. In a majority of the studies (75%), the interventions resulted in caries reduction in the treatment groups. Although a majority of these studies suggest a caries-preventive effect of probiotic bacteria, more long-term clinical studies are needed in this field before probiotics could be recommended for preventing or treating dental caries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2020
Series
Monographs in Oral Science ; 28
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166374 (URN)10.1159/000455377 (DOI)2-s2.0-85074966485 (Scopus ID)978-3-318-06516-9 (ISBN)978-3-318-06517-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, P., Karlsson Videhult, F., Silfverdal, S. A., West, C. E. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2017). Vitamin D Insufficiency among Women Post-Partum in Northern Sweden: A Public Health Concern. Food and Nutrition Sciences (8), 99-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vitamin D Insufficiency among Women Post-Partum in Northern Sweden: A Public Health Concern
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2017 (English)In: Food and Nutrition Sciences, ISSN 2157-944X, E-ISSN 2157-9458, no 8, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pregnancy and post-partum represent a period of susceptibility for vitamin D insufficiency. This study investigated S-25 [OH] D levels in women in northern Sweden 4 weeks post-partum and its association with selected background factors. Blood from 100 healthy women were analyzed for iron status and serum levels of S-25[OH] D using ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS). <50 nmol/L was categorized as insufficiency and <25 nmol/L as deficiency. Maternal BMI, dietary habits, fungal infections during pregnancy, and infant birth characteristics were collected using questionnaires and medical charts. 58% were vitamin D insufficient whereas 10% had deficiency. Insufficiency was most common during winter (OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.1-6.96) and women with deficiency reported lower milk consumption; 11.3 ± 22.8 intakes per months vs. 34.0 ± 28.9 for those above 25 nmol/L (p < 0.05). Vitamin D-insufficient women had lower serum ferritin levels (p < 0.01) and higher serum transferrin levels (p < 0.05). A history of vaginal fungal infection during pregnancy was associated with insufficiency (OR = 5.10; 95% CI = 1.01-25.73), however, the confidence interval of the estimate was wide, resulting in uncertainty. It is concluded that vitamin D insufficiency 4 weeks post-partum was common in women living at 63°49'N. The odds of being insufficient were increased during winter whereas milk consumption was negatively associated with deficiency. The low vitamin D-levels particularly during winter is a public health concern. From a public health perspective it has to be considered whether dietary advices alone should be modified or if supplementation with vitamin D during pregnancy and the post-partum period also is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2017
Keywords
Vitamin D Insufficiency, Fungal Infection, Postpartum, Public Health, Season
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130490 (URN)10.4236/fns.2017.81007 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stecksen-Blicks, C., Hasslöf, P., Kieri, C. & Widman, K. (2014). Caries and background factors in Swedish 4-year-old children with special reference to immigrant status. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 72(8), 852-858
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caries and background factors in Swedish 4-year-old children with special reference to immigrant status
2014 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 852-858Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. This study assesses the prevalence of caries and some background factors in 4-year-old children in the city of Umse, northern Sweden, and compares this with data from earlier studies to reveal changes over time. Materials and methods. Children from the catchment areas of three Public Dental Health Service clinics in Umea (n = 224) born during the third quarter of 2008 were invited to undergo a clinical dental examination. Decayed surfaces (including both dentine and enamel, except for enamel lesions on buccal and lingual surfaces), missing and filled surfaces (dmfs) were recorded using the same methods and criteria as in a series of earlier studies performed between 1980-2007. Background data were collected in a case-history and a questionnaire. Results. The proportion of children with caries significantly decreased from 2007 (38%) to 2012 (22%) (p < 0.05). In addition, the distribution of dmfs differed significantly between these years (p < 0.05). More immigrant children had caries (42%) than non-immigrant children (15%) (p < 0.05). For children with caries, there were no significant changes in the distribution of dmfs between 1980-2012 (p > 0.05). An immigrant background was associated with a lower frequency of tooth brushing and a higher intake of ice cream, sweets and chocolate drinks (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Although the proportion of children with caries declined between 2007-2012, this decline was limited to non-immigrant children. Since 1980 the distribution of dmfs remained unchanged among children with caries. More research on interventions for changing oral health behaviours is needed, specifically for immigrant children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
caries, children, immigrants, polarization
National Category
Dentistry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96939 (URN)10.3109/00016357.2014.914569 (DOI)000344330400042 ()2-s2.0-84931589101 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2014-12-05 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, P., West, C., Karlsson Videhult, F., Brandelius, C. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2013). Early intervention with probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei F19 has no long-term effect on caries experience. Caries Research, 47(6), 559-565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early intervention with probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei F19 has no long-term effect on caries experience
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2013 (English)In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 559-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to evaluate possible long-term effects of a cereal diet supplemented with Lactobacillus paracasei F19 (LF19) during weaning on caries experience, mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LBC) in a group of 9-year-old children. A secondary aim was to evaluate if the intervention resulted in the permanent integration of LF19 as part of the oral microbiota. The study followed up on a double-blind placebo-controlled randomised trial. Among 179 infants that were randomised to a daily diet that included cereals with or without LF19 from 4 to 13 months of age, 56 from the probiotic group and 62 from the placebo group participated in the follow-up at 9 years. Data were collected by oral clinical examination and questionnaires. MS and LBC levels were assessed with conventional cultivation; LF19 was detected by using randomly amplified polymerase chain reactions (RAPD-PCR). At the follow-up, neither decayed, missing and filled surfaces for primary teeth (dmfs) nor decayed, missing and filled surfaces for permanent teeth (DMFS) differed significantly between the probiotic and placebo groups (p > 0.05). MS and LBC levels were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). RAPD-PCR showed no evidence of oral colonisation with LF19 in the study group. It is concluded that an early intervention with LF19 did not affect the frequency of dental caries, MS or LBC. LF19 did not establish itself as a permanent facet of the oral microbiota in any of the subjects included in this study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karger, 2013
Keywords
Dental caries, Lactobacilli, Mutans streptococci, Probiotic intervention

National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67782 (URN)10.1159/000350524 (DOI)000327054900004 ()23838478 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84879751624 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in accepted form

Available from: 2013-04-04 Created: 2013-04-03 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Vestman, N. R., Hasslöf, P., Keller, M. K., Granström, E., Roos, S., Twetman, S. & Stecksen-Blicks, C. (2013). Lactobacillus reuteri influences regrowth of mutans streptococci after full-mouth disinfection: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial. Caries Research, 47(4), 338-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lactobacillus reuteri influences regrowth of mutans streptococci after full-mouth disinfection: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial
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2013 (English)In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study assessed whether the persistence of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 in saliva could delay the regrowth of mutans streptococci (MS) after a full-mouth disinfection with chlorhexidine (CHX). A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a 6-week intervention period and 3- and 6-month follow-up was performed. 62 healthy subjects with moderate to high counts of MS were randomly assigned to a test group (n = 32) or a placebo group (n = 30). Before onset of the intervention, subjects received two sessions of professional cleaning, flossing, and application of CHX varnish and rinsed their mouth with a CHX solution between the sessions (2 days). Thereafter, the test group used probiotic lozenges (2/day) containing L. reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289; 1 × 108 CFU of each strain), and the placebo group used identical lozenges lacking the lactobacilli. Saliva samples were collected and cultured onto selective media, and isolates of L. reuteri as well as DNA directly extracted from saliva were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers. Presence of salivary MS was analysed with a chair-side test. L. reuteri was frequently detected by culture during the intervention period but in only 3 test group subjects at follow-ups. Regrowth of MS statistically significantly differed depending on the presence or absence of L. reuteri DSM 17938 detected by PCR. We conclude that cultivable L. reuteri strains may only sporadically be confirmed after termination of the intervention, but subjects with PCR-detected L. reuteridemonstrated slower regrowth of MS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2013
Keywords
Detection, Lactobacilli, Mutans streptococci, Probiotics

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80078 (URN)10.1159/000347233 (DOI)000322932800010 ()23486236 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84874804267 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-09-09 Created: 2013-09-09 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, P. (2013). Probiotic Lactobacilli in the context of dental caries as a biofilm-mediated disease. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotic Lactobacilli in the context of dental caries as a biofilm-mediated disease
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: The World Health Organization defines probiotics as ‘live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host’. Traditionally, probiotic microorganisms have been used to prevent or treat gastrointestinal tract diseases. In the last 15 years, there has been increasing interest of a possible probiotic impact on the oral microbiota and dental caries. Dental caries is a multifactorial disease, and the causative factor in the oral microbiota includes a shift from a balanced microflora to a microflora that includes more aciduric species such as mutans streptococci (MS), non-mutans streptococci, and Actinomyces. MS is considered an opportunistic pathogen although several other bacteria also contribute to the disease. Early acquisition of MS is associated with early development of caries; therefore a desirable complement to other prophylactic measures would be a MS colonization inhibitor.

Objective: To better understand how selected strains of probiotic lactobacilli interact with MS in vitro and in vivo and to study the impact of probiotic lactobacilli on caries development during childhood.

Material and methods: The in vitro properties of probiotic lactobacilli were studied with regard to (i) acid production from sugars and sugar alcohols, (ii) growth inhibition capacity on clinical isolates and reference strains of MS as well as Candida albicans and (iii) the capacity to co-aggregate with MS. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) tested the short-term effect of intervention with two Lactobacillus reuteri strains on MS, which was evaluated after treatment with chlorhexidine. The re-growth patterns of MS and 19 other selected strains were also evaluated. In the second clinical study  we investigated the long-term effect on MS prevalence and dental caries after an intervention with Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (LF19) between 4 and 13 months of age.

Results: The results from the in vitro testing showed that strains of probiotic lactobacilli differed in their fermentation patterns, inhibition capacity and their capacity to co-aggregate, which should be kept in mind in the translation to clinical research. The clinical study on short-term effects of two L. reuteri strains on MS and other oral strains showed no effect on re-growth patterns after intervention. The clinical study on long-term effects of LF19 showed no effect on the prevalence of MS. Furthermore, the clinical follow-up at 9 years of age showed no differences in either decayed, missing, and filled surface (dmfs) or DMFS between the probiotic and placebo groups. Evaluation of saliva samples showed no signs of oral colonization with LF19 in the study group.

Conclusion: The in vitro testing showed potentials of the selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains for interference with MS and C. albicans. The results from the clinical studies showed no such effect on MS or dental caries. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of specific probiotic applications in the prevention of dental caries is limited and does not allow for conclusions concerning the use of probiotic bacteria as a preventive measure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2013. p. 57
Series
Umeå University odontological dissertations, ISSN 0345-7532 ; 125
Keywords
caries prevention, co-aggregation, dental caries, growth inhibition, mutans streptococci, probiotic lactobacilli, re-colonization
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67843 (URN)978-91-7459-574-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-05-03, Sal B, Tandläkarhögskolan, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-04-12 Created: 2013-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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