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Bergström, A.-K., Creed, I. F., Palstev, A., de Wit, H. A., Lau, D. C. P., Drakare, S., . . . Hessen, D. O. (2024). Declining calcium concentration drives shifts toward smaller and less nutritious zooplankton in northern lakes. Global Change Biology, 30(3), Article ID e17220.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Declining calcium concentration drives shifts toward smaller and less nutritious zooplankton in northern lakes
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2024 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 30, no 3, article id e17220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Zooplankton community composition of northern lakes is changing due to the interactive effects of climate change and recovery from acidification, yet limited data are available to assess these changes combined. Here, we built a database using archives of temperature, water chemistry and zooplankton data from 60 Scandinavian lakes that represent broad spatial and temporal gradients in key parameters: temperature, calcium (Ca), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), and pH. Using machine learning techniques, we found that Ca was the most important determinant of the relative abundance of all zooplankton groups studied, while pH was second, and TOC third in importance. Further, we found that Ca is declining in almost all lakes, and we detected a critical Ca threshold in lake water of 1.3 mg L−1, below which the relative abundance of zooplankton shifts toward dominance of Holopedium gibberum and small cladocerans at the expense of Daphnia and copepods. Our findings suggest that low Ca concentrations may shape zooplankton communities, and that current trajectories of Ca decline could promote widespread changes in pelagic food webs as zooplankton are important trophic links from phytoplankton to fish and different zooplankton species play different roles in this context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
calanoids, calcium, cladocerans, cyclopoids, Daphnia, Holopedium, lakes, phosphorus, temperature, zooplankton community composition
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222352 (URN)10.1111/gcb.17220 (DOI)001177052900001 ()38433333 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85186891385 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2021-01062Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS 21:1145Swedish Research Council, 2020-03224
Available from: 2024-03-15 Created: 2024-03-15 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Palstev, A., Bergström, A.-K., Vuorio, K., Creed, I. F., Hessen, D. O., Kortelainen, P., . . . Drakare, S. (2024). Phytoplankton biomass in northern lakes reveals a complex response to global change. Science of the Total Environment, 940, Article ID 173570.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phytoplankton biomass in northern lakes reveals a complex response to global change
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2024 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 940, article id 173570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global change may introduce fundamental alterations in phytoplankton biomass and community structure that can alter the productivity of northern lakes. In this study, we utilized Swedish and Finnish monitoring data from lakes that are spatially (135 lakes) and temporally (1995-2019, 110 lakes) extensive to assess how phytoplankton biomass (PB) of dominant phytoplankton groups related to changes in water temperature, pH and key nutrients [total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), total organic carbon (TOC), iron (Fe)] along spatial (Fennoscandia) and temporal (25 years) gradients. Using a machine learning approach, we found that TP was the most important determinant of total PB and biomass of a specific species of Raphidophyceae - Gonyostomum semen - and Cyanobacteria (both typically with adverse impacts on food-webs and water quality) in spatial analyses, while Fe and pH were second in importance for G. semen and TN and pH were second and third in importance for Cyanobacteria. However, in temporal analyses, decreasing Fe and increasing pH and TOC were associated with a decrease in G. semen and an increase in Cyanobacteria. In addition, in many lakes increasing TOC seemed to have generated browning to an extent that significantly reduced PB. The identified discrepancy between the spatial and temporal results suggests that substitutions of data for space-for-time may not be adequate to characterize long-term effects of global change on phytoplankton. Further, we found that total PB exhibited contrasting temporal trends (increasing in northern- and decreasing in southern Fennoscandia), with the decline in total PB being more pronounced than the increase. Among phytoplankton, G. semen biomass showed the strongest decline, while cyanobacterial biomass showed the strongest increase over 25 years. Our findings suggest that progressing browning and changes in Fe and pH promote significant temporal changes in PB and shifts in phytoplankton community structures in northern lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Global change, Lakes, Phytoplankton, Spatial, Temporal
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-225972 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2024.173570 (DOI)38825201 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85194876061 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-03224Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS 21:1145Swedish Research Council Formas, 2021-01062
Available from: 2024-06-11 Created: 2024-06-11 Last updated: 2024-06-11Bibliographically approved
Puts, I. C., Ask, J., Deininger, A., Jonsson, A., Karlsson, J. & Bergström, A.-K. (2023). Browning affects pelagic productivity in northern lakes by surface water warming and carbon fertilization. Global Change Biology, 29(2), 375-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Browning affects pelagic productivity in northern lakes by surface water warming and carbon fertilization
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2023 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 375-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global change impacts important environmental drivers for pelagic gross primary production (GPP) in northern lakes, such as temperature, light, nutrient, and inorganic carbon availability. Separate and/or synergistic impacts of these environmental drivers on pelagic GPP remain largely unresolved. Here, we assess key drivers of pelagic GPP by combining detailed depth profiles of summer pelagic GPP with environmental and climatic data across 45 small and shallow lakes across northern Sweden (20 boreal, 6 subarctic, and 19 arctic lakes). We found that across lakes summer pelagic GPP was strongest associated with lake water temperatures, lake carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations impacted by lake water pH, and further moderated by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations influencing light and nutrient conditions. We further used this dataset to assess the extent of additional DOC-induced warming of epilimnia (here named internal warming), which was especially pronounced in shallow lakes (decreasing 0.96°C for every decreasing m in average lake depth) and increased with higher concentrations of DOC. Additionally, the total pools and relative proportion of dissolved inorganic carbon and DOC, further influenced pelagic GPP with drivers differing slightly among the boreal, subarctic and Arctic biomes. Our study provides novel insights in that global change affects pelagic GPP in northern lakes not only by modifying the organic carbon cycle and light and nutrient conditions, but also through modifications of inorganic carbon supply and temperature. Considering the large-scale impacts and similarities of global warming, browning and recovery from acidification of lakes at higher latitudes throughout the northern hemisphere, these changes are likely to operate on a global scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
acidification, bicarbonate system, DOC, inorganic carbon, primary production, stoichiometry, supersaturation, temperature
National Category
Physical Geography Ecology Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201183 (URN)10.1111/gcb.16469 (DOI)000869699400001 ()36197126 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140013427 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0083Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00486Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2022-11-23 Created: 2022-11-23 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Golub, M., Koupaei-Abyazani, N., Vesala, T., Mammarella, I., Ojala, A., Bohrer, G., . . . Desai, A. R. (2023). Diel, seasonal, and inter-annual variation in carbon dioxide effluxes from lakes and reservoirs. Environmental Research Letters, 18(3), Article ID 034046.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diel, seasonal, and inter-annual variation in carbon dioxide effluxes from lakes and reservoirs
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 18, no 3, article id 034046Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Accounting for temporal changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) effluxes from freshwaters remains a challenge for global and regional carbon budgets. Here, we synthesize 171 site-months of flux measurements of CO2 based on the eddy covariance method from 13 lakes and reservoirs in the Northern Hemisphere, and quantify dynamics at multiple temporal scales. We found pronounced sub-annual variability in CO2 flux at all sites. By accounting for diel variation, only 11% of site-months were net daily sinks of CO2. Annual CO2 emissions had an average of 25% (range 3%-58%) interannual variation. Similar to studies on streams, nighttime emissions regularly exceeded daytime emissions. Biophysical regulations of CO2 flux variability were delineated through mutual information analysis. Sample analysis of CO2 fluxes indicate the importance of continuous measurements. Better characterization of short- and long-term variability is necessary to understand and improve detection of temporal changes of CO2 fluxes in response to natural and anthropogenic drivers. Our results indicate that existing global lake carbon budgets relying primarily on daytime measurements yield underestimates of net emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP Publishing, 2023
Keywords
carbon flux, eddy covariance, freshwater systems, lakes, reservoirs, synthesis
National Category
Climate Research Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-205919 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/acb834 (DOI)000953683700001 ()2-s2.0-85150029537 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon Europe, 101056921EU, Horizon Europe, 312571EU, Horizon Europe, 282842Swedish Research Council, 2016-04153Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222
Available from: 2023-03-27 Created: 2023-03-27 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Bergström, A.-K., Lau, D. C. P., Isles, P. D. F., Jonsson, A. & Creed, I. F. (2022). Biomass, community composition and N:P recycling ratios of zooplankton in northern high-latitude lakes with contrasting levels of N deposition and dissolved organic carbon. Freshwater Biology, 67(9), 1508-1520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomass, community composition and N:P recycling ratios of zooplankton in northern high-latitude lakes with contrasting levels of N deposition and dissolved organic carbon
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2022 (English)In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 67, no 9, p. 1508-1520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]
  1. Global changes are causing decreases in inorganic nitrogen (N) concentrations, increases in coloured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, and decreases in dissolved inorganic N to total phosphorus ratios (DIN:TP) in northern lakes. The effects of these changes on phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass and the N:P recycling ratio of zooplankton remain unresolved.
  2. In 33 Swedish headwater lakes across subarctic-to-boreal gradients with different levels of N deposition (low N in the north [Västerbotten, boreal; Abisko, subarctic] vs. high N in the south [Värmland, boreal; Jämtland, subarctic]), we measured water chemistry, phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll-a [Chl-a], Chl-a:TP), seston mineral quality (C:P, N:P), as well as zooplankton biomass, community composition, and C:N:P stoichiometry. We estimated nutrient imbalances and the N:P recycling ratios of zooplankton using ecological stoichiometry models.
  3. There was a large-scale gradient from low lake DIN and DIN:TP in the north to high DIN and DIN:TP in the south, with lower DIN:TP in lakes coinciding with higher DOC within each region. Lower lake DIN was associated with lower phytoplankton biomass (lower Chl-a:TP). Lower lake DIN:TP was associated with richer seston mineral quality (lower seston C:P and N:P) and higher zooplankton biomass.
  4. Zooplankton community composition differed in the north vs. south, with a dominance of N-requiring calanoid copepods with high N:P in the north and P-requiring cladocerans with low N:P in the south. Also, greater differences in zooplankton community composition were found between subarctic regions (with lower DOC) than between boreal regions (with higher DOC), suggesting that increases in lake DOC and associated declines in lake DIN:TP reduce differences in zooplankton community composition.
  5. The combination of lower lake DIN, higher lake DOC, and lower lake DIN:TP led to reduced zooplankton N:P recycling ratios, possibly by reducing seston N:P and/or by enhancing calanoid copepod dominance in the zooplankton community.
  6. Our findings suggest that the combination of declining N deposition and increasing lake browning in northern high-latitude lakes will reduce phytoplankton biomass, but will concurrently enhance seston mineral quality and probably also zooplankton biomass and their recycling efficiency of P relative to N.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
biomass, C:N:P stoichiometry, community composition, plankton, subarctic-to-boreal
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197728 (URN)10.1111/fwb.13956 (DOI)000814334600001 ()2-s2.0-85132336700 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0083Swedish Research Council, 621‐2014‐5909
Available from: 2022-07-04 Created: 2022-07-04 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Bergström, A.-K., Deininger, A., Jonsson, A., Karlsson, J. & Vrede, T. (2021). Effects of nitrogen enrichment on zooplankton biomass and N:P recycling ratios across a DOC gradient in northern-latitude lakes. Hydrobiologia, 848(21), 4991-5010
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of nitrogen enrichment on zooplankton biomass and N:P recycling ratios across a DOC gradient in northern-latitude lakes
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2021 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 848, no 21, p. 4991-5010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We used data from whole-lake studies to assess how changes in food quantity (phytoplankton biomass) and quality (phytoplankton community composition, seston C:P and N:P) with N fertilization affect zooplankton biomass, community composition and C:N:P stoichiometry, and their N:P recycling ratio along a gradient in lake DOC concentrations. We found that despite major differences in phytoplankton biomass with DOC (unimodal distributions, especially with N fertilization), no major differences in zooplankton biomass were detectable. Instead, phytoplankton to zooplankton biomass ratios were high, especially at intermediate DOC and after N fertilization, implying low trophic transfer efficiencies. An explanation for the observed low phytoplankton resource use, and biomass responses in zooplankton, was dominance of colony forming chlorophytes of reduced edibility at intermediate lake DOC, combined with reduced phytoplankton mineral quality (enhanced seston N:P) with N fertilization. N fertilization, however, increased zooplankton N:P recycling ratios, with largest impact at low DOC where phytoplankton benefitted from light sufficiently to cause enhanced seston N:P. Our results suggest that although N enrichment and increased phytoplankton biomass do not necessarily increase zooplankton biomass, bottom-up effects may still impact zooplankton and their N:P recycling ratio through promotion of phytoplankton species of low edibility and altered mineral quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Dissolved organic carbon, Food quantity-quality, Light, Nitrogen, Pelagic food web, Phosphorus
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187776 (URN)10.1007/s10750-021-04689-5 (DOI)000695762400001 ()2-s2.0-85114852541 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-4675Swedish Research Council Formas, 215-2010-922Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0083
Available from: 2021-09-21 Created: 2021-09-21 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Lau, D. C. P., Jonsson, A., Isles, P. D. F., Creed, I. F. & Bergström, A.-K. (2021). Lowered nutritional quality of plankton caused by global environmental changes. Global Change Biology, 27(23), 6294-6306
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lowered nutritional quality of plankton caused by global environmental changes
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2021 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 27, no 23, p. 6294-6306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global environmental changes are causing widespread nutrient depletion, declines in the ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) to total phosphorus (DIN:TP), and increases in both water temperature and terrestrial colored dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (browning) in high-latitude northern lakes. Declining lake DIN:TP, warming, and browning alter the nutrient limitation regime and biomass of phytoplankton, but how these stressors together affect the nutritional quality in terms of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents of the pelagic food web components remains unknown. We assessed the fatty acid compositions of seston and zooplankton in 33 lakes across south-to-north and boreal-to-subarctic gradients in Sweden. Data showed higher lake DIN:TP in the south than in the north, and that boreal lakes were warmer and browner than subarctic lakes. Lake DIN:TP strongly affected the PUFA contents—especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)—in seston, calanoids, and copepods (as a group), but not in cladocerans. The EPA+DHA contents increased by 123% in seston, 197% in calanoids, and 230% in copepods across a lake molar DIN:TP gradient from 0.17 to 14.53, indicating lower seston and copepod nutritional quality in the more N-limited lakes (those with lower DIN:TP). Water temperature affected EPA+DHA contents of zooplankton, especially cladocerans, but not seston. Cladoceran EPA+DHA contents were reduced by ca. 6% for every 1°C increase in surface water. Also, the EPA, DHA, or EPA+DHA contents of Bosmina, cyclopoids, and copepods increased in lakes with higher DOC concentrations or aromaticity. Our findings indicate that zooplankton food quality for higher consumers will decrease with warming alone (for cladocerans) or in combination with declining lake DIN:TP (for copepods), but impacts of these stressors are moderated by lake browning. Global environmental changes that drive northern lakes toward more N-limited, warmer, and browner conditions will reduce PUFA availability and nutritional quality of the pelagic food web components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
boreal lakes, dissolved organic carbon, fatty acids, N:P stoichiometry, nitrogen deposition, phytoplankton, seston, subarctic lakes, warming, zooplankton
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188395 (URN)10.1111/gcb.15887 (DOI)000702006200001 ()34520606 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85115980908 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-5909Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2016.0083
Available from: 2021-10-07 Created: 2021-10-07 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
Isles, P. D. F., Creed, I. F., Jonsson, A. & Bergström, A.-K. (2021). Trade-offs Between Light and Nutrient Availability Across Gradients of Dissolved Organic Carbon Lead to Spatially and Temporally Variable Responses of Lake Phytoplankton Biomass to Browning. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 24(8), 1837-1852
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trade-offs Between Light and Nutrient Availability Across Gradients of Dissolved Organic Carbon Lead to Spatially and Temporally Variable Responses of Lake Phytoplankton Biomass to Browning
2021 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 1837-1852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northern lakes are experiencing widespread increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that are likely to lead to changes in pelagic phytoplankton biomass. Pelagic phytoplankton biomass responds to trade-offs between light and nutrient availability. However, the influence of DOC light absorbing properties and carbon–nutrient stoichiometry on phytoplankton biomass across seasonal or spatial gradients has not been assessed. Here, we analyzed data from almost 5000 lakes to examine how the carbon–phytoplankton biomass relationship is influenced by seasonal changes in light availability, DOC light absorbing properties (carbon-specific visual absorbance, SVA420), and DOC–nutrient [total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP)] stoichiometry, using TOC as a proxy for DOC. We found evidence for trade-offs between light and nutrient availability in the relationship between DOC and phytoplankton biomass [chlorophyll (chl)-a], with the shape of the relationship varying with season. A clear unimodal relationship was found only in the fall, particularly in the subsets of lakes with the highest TOC:TP. Observed trends of increasing TOC:TP and decreasing TOC:TN suggest that the effects of future browning will be contingent on future changes in carbon–nutrient stoichiometry. If browning continues, phytoplankton biomass will likely increase in most northern lakes, with increases of up to 76% for a 1.7 mg L−1 increase in DOC expected in subarctic regions, where DOC, SVA420, DOC:TN, and DOC:TP are all low. In boreal regions with higher DOC and higher SVA420, and thus lower light availability, lakes may experience only moderate increases or even decreases in phytoplankton biomass with future browning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Boreal, Browning, Chlorophyll-a, DOC, DOC:TN, DOC:TP, Lake, Stoichiometry, Subarctic, Sweden
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182175 (URN)10.1007/s10021-021-00619-7 (DOI)000632792900004 ()2-s2.0-85103204629 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-04-15 Created: 2021-04-15 Last updated: 2022-01-12Bibliographically approved
Bergström, A.-K., Jonsson, A., Isles, P. D. F., Creed, I. F. & Lau, D. C. P. (2020). Changes in nutritional quality and nutrient limitation regimes of phytoplankton in response to declining N deposition in mountain lakes. Aquatic Sciences, 82(2), Article ID 31.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in nutritional quality and nutrient limitation regimes of phytoplankton in response to declining N deposition in mountain lakes
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2020 (English)In: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 82, no 2, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton play a key role in supporting aquatic food webs. However, the effects of ongoing large-scale changes in the concentrations and stoichiometry of important biological compounds [dissolved inorganic N (DIN), total phosphorus (TP), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DIN:TP] on the development and nutritional quality of phytoplankton for higher trophic levels are unclear. We conducted lake studies and in situ bioassay experiments in two Swedish mountain regions [Abisko (north) and Jamtland (south)] with different N deposition and where lakes in each region were distributed along a similar gradient in lake DOC (2-7 mg L-1) to assess whether differences in nutrients, DOC and DIN:TP induced differences in phytoplankton quantity [chlorophyll a (Chl-a) and seston carbon (C)] and quality [seston C:N:P stoichiometry and fatty acid (FA) composition]. Using long-term monitoring data from lakes in these two mountain regions, we found declining long-term trends in N deposition and lake DIN and total TP concentrations, but not in lake DIN:TP. Lakes in Abisko received lower N deposition and had lower DIN:TP than those in Jamtland. Phytoplankton was N- to NP-limited in Abisko lakes but NP dual-limited in Jamtland lakes. The N fertilization effects induced by higher DIN:TP were weak on phytoplankton quantity but strong on phytoplankton quality. The phytoplankton had lower eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content and higher P content (lower seston C:P) in Abisko compared to in Jamtland. In addition, the quality of the DOC (as indicated by its aromaticity and SUVA) influenced not only the light conditions and the seston C:P ratios, but also the FA composition. We found higher bacteria FA concentrations in seston in Abisko than in Jamtland, despite lower amounts of FA of terrestrial origin in Abisko. Our findings suggest that declining N deposition and enhanced colored terrestrial C loadings leads to lower nutritional quality of basal resources for higher consumers in mountain lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Phytoplankton, Nutritional quality, Fatty acids, Mountain lakes, Sweden
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169465 (URN)10.1007/s00027-020-0697-1 (DOI)000519932100003 ()2-s2.0-85079826029 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-02 Created: 2020-04-02 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Isles, P. D. F., Jonsson, A., Creed, I. F. & Bergström, A.-K. (2020). Does browning affect the identity of limiting nutrients in lakes?. Aquatic Sciences, 82(2), Article ID 45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does browning affect the identity of limiting nutrients in lakes?
2020 (English)In: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 82, no 2, article id 45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have increased recently in many lakes at high latitudes in North America and Europe, but it is unclear what effect this will have on the identity of the limiting nutrient for phytoplankton [nitrogen (N) vs. phosphorus (P)]. Identifying the effect of changing DOC on phytoplankton nutrient limitation is complicated by spatial covariation between atmospheric N deposition and increasing DOC in areas where lake browning occurs. We conducted nutrient-limitation assays in 27 lakes from three sites along gradients of climate and atmospheric N deposition in Sweden. Within each site, lakes were selected to represent the range of DOC concentrations. We also conducted statistical analyses of large-scale lake survey data (n = 4768 lakes divided into 47 regions) to investigate relationships between DOC and nutrient stoichiometry while controlling for differences in N deposition. Our findings confirmed that most lakes were dual-limited by both N and P in the south, whereas northern lakes were primarily N-limited. Throughout Sweden the ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) to total phosphorus (TP) declined with increasing DOC in most regions, suggesting that browner lakes are more likely to be N limited. These results were not supported by our nutrient limitation assays, which identified no relationship between DOC and relative strength of limitation by N or P. Increased DOC also resulted in significant increases in both total and inorganic N and P fractions, suggesting that other factors such as light limitation or increased top-down control become more important as DOC increases.

Keywords
Arctic lakes, Boreal lakes, Dissolved organic carbon, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Phytoplankton Sweden
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169852 (URN)10.1007/s00027-020-00718-y (DOI)000522418100001 ()2-s2.0-85082704352 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-26 Created: 2020-05-26 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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