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Hedlund, Mattias
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Frykholm, E., Simonsson, E., Levik Sandström, S., Hedlund, M., Holmberg, H., Johansson, B., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2024). Applicability of a supramaximal high-intensity interval training program for older adults previously not engaged in regular exercise: analyses of secondary outcomes from the Umeå HIT Study. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 73, Article ID 102647.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of a supramaximal high-intensity interval training program for older adults previously not engaged in regular exercise: analyses of secondary outcomes from the Umeå HIT Study
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2024 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 73, article id 102647Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This analysis of secondary outcomes investigated the applicability of supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) with individually prescribed external intensity performed on stationary bicycles. Sixty-eight participants with a median (min; max) age of 69 (66; 79), at the time not engaged in regular exercise were randomized to 25 twice-weekly sessions of supramaximal HIT (20-min session with 10 × 6-s intervals) or moderate-intensity training (MIT, 40-min session with 3 × 8-min intervals). The primary aim was outcomes on applicability regarding; adherence to prescribed external interval intensity, participant reported positive and negative events, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE 6–20), and affective state (Feeling Scale, FS -5–5). A secondary aim was to investigate change in exercise-related self-efficacy (Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale) and motivation (Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2). Total adherence to the prescribed external interval intensity was [median (min; max)] 89 % (56; 100 %) in supramaximal HIT, and 100 % (95; 100 %) in MIT. The supramaximal HIT group reported 60 % of the positive (112 of 186) and 36 % of the negative (52 of 146) events. At the end of the training period, the median (min; max) session RPE was 15 (12; 17) for supramaximal HIT and 14 (9; 15) for MIT. As for FS, the median last within-session rating was 3 (−1; 5) for supramaximal HIT and 3 (1; 5) for MIT. Exercise-related motivation increased (mean difference in Relative Autonomy Index score = 1.54, 95 % CI [0.69; 2.40]), while self-efficacy did not change (mean difference = 0.55, 95 % CI [-0.75; 1.82]), regardless of group. This study provide support for supramaximal HIT in supervised group settings for older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Feasibility, HIIT, Randomized controlled trial, SIT, Sprint interval training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223607 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2024.102647 (DOI)38604572 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190305065 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017–00912Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020–00159The Kamprad Family FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2024-05-02 Created: 2024-05-02 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, J., De Brandt, J., Hedlund, M., Rullander, A.-C. & Nyberg, A. (2023). Acute physiological effects of supramaximal high-intensity interval training in people with or without COPD. Paper presented at American College of Sports Medicine Annual Congress, Denver, USA, 30 May - 2 June, 2023.. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 55, 549-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute physiological effects of supramaximal high-intensity interval training in people with or without COPD
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2023 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 55, p. 549-549Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-intensity exercise is essential for optimal development of cardiorespiratory fitness and health. This is, however, challenging for most people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to ventilatory limitations, leading to exercise at lower intensities accompanied by suboptimal stress on the cardiovascular and muscular system.

PURPOSE: To compare the acute effects of a novel concept of short-duration supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs. moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in people with COPD and matched healthy controls (HC).

METHODS: Sixteen people with mild to severe COPD (75 ± 6 yr; 8 males; 73 ± 13 FEV1%pred; 119 ± 37 W max aerobic power [MAP]) and 14 HC (74 ± 5 yr; 8 males; 106 ± 14 FEV1%pred; 169 ± 38 W MAP) performed HIIT and MICT on a cycle ergometer in a randomized order. HIIT consisted of 10x6s sprints interspersed with 1-min recovery and was performed at two intensities: 60% of max mean power output for 6-sec (MPO6) and 80%MPO6, estimated from the Borg cycle strength test. MICT consisted of 20-min at 60% of MAP, derived from a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Cardiorespiratory parameters, blood lactate concentration, ratings of exertion/symptoms, and exercise modality preference were obtained.

RESULTS: Exercise characteristics and physiological data collected at the end of exercise are shown in Table 1. All HIIT sessions were completed, while 1 in 3 people with COPD did not complete MICT. The HIIT modality was preferred by 13/16 (COPD) and 12/14 (HC).

CONCLUSION: Short-duration supramaximal HIIT was feasible and enabled a 3.5-fold increase in exercise intensity vs. MICT in people with COPD and HC. Notably, despite the higher exercise intensities, the cardiorespiratory demand during HIIT was similar to MICT and clinically relevant reductions in symptoms were seen in favor of HIIT, in people with COPD. Also, >80% of participants preferred HIIT over MICT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2023
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Sports Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214793 (URN)10.1249/01.mss.0000984960.73546.4c (DOI)
Conference
American College of Sports Medicine Annual Congress, Denver, USA, 30 May - 2 June, 2023.
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation
Note

Supplement

Available from: 2023-09-29 Created: 2023-09-29 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Simonsson, E., Levik Sandström, S., Hedlund, M., Holmberg, H., Johansson, B., Lindelöf, N., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2023). Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 78(9), 1581-1590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness and global cognitive function in older adults: the Umeå hit study-a randomized controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 78, no 9, p. 1581-1590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of regulated and controlled supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIT) adapted for older adults, compared to moderate-intensity training (MIT), on cardiorespiratory fitness; cognitive, cardiovascular, and muscular function; and quality of life.

METHODS: Sixty-eight nonexercising older adults (66-79 years, 44% males) were randomized to 3 months of twice-weekly HIT (20-minute session including 10 × 6-second intervals) or MIT (40-minute session including 3 × 8-minute intervals) on stationary bicycles in an ordinary gym setting. Individualized target intensity was watt controlled with a standardized pedaling cadence and individual adjustment of the resistance load. Primary outcomes were cardiorespiratory fitness (V̇o2peak) and global cognitive function (unit-weighted composite).

RESULTS: V̇o2peak increased significantly (mean 1.38 mL/kg/min, 95% CI [0.77, 1.98]), with no between-group difference (mean difference 0.05 [-1.17, 1.25]). Global cognition did not improve (0.02 [-0.05, 0.09]), nor differed between groups (0.11 [-0.03, 0.24]). Significant between-group differences in change were observed for working memory (0.32 [0.01, 0.64]), and maximal isometric knee extensor muscle strength (0.07 N·m/kg [0.003, 0.137]), both in favor of HIT. Irrespective of the group, there was a negative change in episodic memory (-0.15 [-0.28, -0.02]), a positive change in visuospatial ability (0.26 [0.08, 0.44]), and a decrease in systolic (-2.09 mmHg [-3.54, -0.64]) and diastolic (-1.27 mmHg [-2.31, -0.25]) blood pressure.

CONCLUSIONS: In nonexercising older adults, 3 months of watt-controlled supramaximal HIT improved cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular function to a similar extent as MIT, despite half the training time. In favor of HIT, there was an improvement in muscular function and a potential domain-specific effect on working memory.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT03765385.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Aerobic capacity, HIIT, Moderate-intensity training, SIT, Sprint interval training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214207 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glad070 (DOI)000959356800001 ()36972981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169177109 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00912Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00159The Kamprad Family FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedFoundation for the Memory of Ragnhild and Einar LundströmThe Kempe FoundationsUmeå University
Available from: 2023-09-08 Created: 2023-09-08 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Asplund, S., Lindgren, B.-M., Åström, S., Hedlund, M. & Åhlin, J. (2023). Organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors associated with self-rated exhaustion disorder among municipal employees in rural northern Sweden. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 75(4), 1215-1229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors associated with self-rated exhaustion disorder among municipal employees in rural northern Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 1215-1229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research indicates that good organizational and psychosocial environments are vital to well-functioning workplaces and employee health. Working in the municipal sector and in the rural context may contribute to more health problems, poorer organizational and psychosocial work environments, and higher sick-leave rates.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors among municipal employees with or without self-rated exhaustion disorder (s-ED) in rural northern Sweden.

Methods: The Modern Work Life Questionnaire and the Self-Rated Exhaustion Disorder Scale were used among 1093 municipal employees.

Results: The results showed that there were significant differences between the s-ED and the non-s-ED group in all but one of the organizational and psychosocial environmental work factors. Various demands, i.e. quantitative, emotional, intellectual, and IT demands were some factors associated with the s-ED group. Social support, resources, and time for work and reflection were some factors associated with the non-s-ED group. Both the s-ED and the non-s-ED groups assessed significantly higher emotional demands and less resources compared to national reference values.

Conclusion: Findings from this study are relevant to a better understanding what organizational and psychosocial work environmental work factor the employer need to pay extra attention to. Addressing risk and protective factors in the work environment could tribute to promote occupational well-being, preventing exhaustion disorder and long-term sick leave among municipal employees in rural northern Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2023
Keywords
occupational health, occupational stress, public sector, social support, workload
National Category
Nursing Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Caring Sciences; Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201056 (URN)10.3233/WOR-220225 (DOI)001054074600010 ()36776096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168221723 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2022-11-16 Created: 2022-11-16 Last updated: 2023-09-18Bibliographically approved
Simonsson, E., Jonasson Stiernman, L., Lundquist, A., Rosendahl, E., Hedlund, M., Lindelöf, N. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2022). Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 16, Article ID 997131.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dopamine d2/3-receptor availability and its association with autonomous motivation to exercise in older adults: an exploratory [11c]-raclopride study
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 16, article id 997131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Autonomous motivation to exercise occurs when the activity is voluntary and with a perceived inherent satisfaction from the activity itself. It has been suggested that autonomous motivation is related to striatal dopamine D2/3-receptor (D2/3R) availability within the brain. In this study, we hypothesized that D2/3R availability in three striatal regions (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) would be positively associated with self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise. We also examined this relationship with additional exploratory analyses across a set of a priori extrastriatal regions of interest (ROI).

Methods: Our sample comprised 49 older adults (28 females) between 64 and 78 years of age. The D2/3R availability was quantified from positron emission tomography using the non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]-raclopride ligand. The exercise-related autonomous motivation was assessed with the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2.

Results: No significant associations were observed between self-reported autonomous motivation to exercise and D2/3R availability within the striatum (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) using semi-partial correlations controlling for ROI volume on D2/3R availability. For exploratory analyses, positive associations were observed for the superior (r = 0.289, p = 0.023) and middle frontal gyrus (r = 0.330, p = 0.011), but not for the inferior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, or anterior insular cortex.

Conclusion: This study could not confirm the suggested link between striatal D2/3R availability and subjective autonomous motivation to exercise among older adults. The exploratory findings, however, propose that frontal brain regions may be involved in the intrinsic regulation of exercise-related behaviors, though this has to be confirmed by future studies using a more suitable ligand and objective measures of physical activity levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
aging, autonomous motivation, dopamine, exercise motivation, PET, self-determination theory (SDT)
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201462 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2022.997131 (DOI)000889590000001 ()2-s2.0-85142664855 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-00530Region VästerbottenSwedish National Centre for Research in SportsThe Kamprad Family Foundation
Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, J., De Brandt, J., Hedlund, M., Rullander, A.-C. & Nyberg, A. (2022). Innovative exercise for optimizing exercise intensity in COPD. Paper presented at European Respiratory Congress 2022, Barcelona, Spain, September 4-6, 2022. European Respiratory Journal, 60(Suppl. 66), Article ID 4654.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovative exercise for optimizing exercise intensity in COPD
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2022 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 60, no Suppl. 66, article id 4654Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High-intensity exercise is essential for optimal physiological exercise adaptations but challenging to perform for most people with COPD due to ventilatory limitations, leading to use of lower exercise intensities accompanied by suboptimal stress on the cardiovascular and muscular system. This study compared the acute effects of a novel concept of short-duration supramaximal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs. traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in people with COPD.

Methods: Thirteen people with COPD (75±6 yr; 8 males; 72±13 FEV1%pred; 124±37 Wpeak) performed short-duration supramaximal HIIT and MICT on a cycle ergometer in a randomized order. HIIT consisted of 10x6s sprints interspersed with 1-min recovery and was performed at two intensities (HIIT60% & HIIT80%). MICT consisted of 20-min at 60% of CPET Wpeak. Cardiorespiratory parameters, blood lactate concentration, ratings of exertion/symptoms, and exercise modality preference were obtained.

Results: Exercise characteristics and physiological data are seen in Table 1. All patients completed HIIT, while 4 out of 13 stopped MICT prematurely. Notably, 85% preferred HIIT over MICT.

Conclusion: The novel concept of short-duration supramaximal HIIT enabled a 3 to 4-fold increase in exercise intensity vs. MICT. Notably, the cardiorespiratory demand during HIIT was similar to MICT, and clinically relevant reductions in symptoms were even seen in favor of HIIT.

Keywords
exercise, COPD
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201715 (URN)10.1183/13993003.congress-2022.4654 (DOI)
Conference
European Respiratory Congress 2022, Barcelona, Spain, September 4-6, 2022
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2022-12-15 Created: 2022-12-15 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Asplund, S., Åhlin, J., Åström, S., Hedlund, M., Lindgren, B.-M. & Ericson-Lidman, E. (2021). Self-rated exhaustion disorder and associated health-related factors among municipal employees in rural areas of northern Sweden. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 659-668
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated exhaustion disorder and associated health-related factors among municipal employees in rural areas of northern Sweden
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2021 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, p. 659-668Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study among municipal employees in rural areas of northern Sweden were to assess the prevalence of self-rated exhaustion disorder (s-ED), describe plausible between-group differences in self-reported health-related factors among employees with or without s-ED, and identify health-related factors associated with s-ED.

METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 1093 municipal employees (76.1% women) in two rural areas using an instrument measuring s-ED and health variables drawn from the Modern Worklife Questionnaire (MWQ), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the National Board of Health and Welfare's questions about physical activity. Comparisons were made between an s-ED and a non-s-ED group. Health-related factors associated with s-ED were identified through a logistic regression.

RESULTS: Self-rated exhaustion disorder was reported by 21.5% of the participants. Health-related factors associated with s-ED were cognitive problems, sleep problems, depressive symptoms, high stress, poor self-rated health, and stomach problems. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of participants who met the criteria of physical activity among s-ED and non-s-ED group.

CONCLUSION: Findings from this study suggest that s-ED is more common among municipal employees in rural areas than in other working populations in Sweden. Several health-related factors were associated with s-ED. Regular use of a self-rated instrument in evaluating the organizational and social work environment can identify people at risk of developing exhaustion disorder and requiring long-term sick leave.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Health, Municipal employees, Rural areas, Self-rated exhaustion disorder, Work-related stress
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-178307 (URN)10.1007/s00420-020-01617-3 (DOI)000597725100001 ()33296011 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097385971 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-08 Created: 2021-01-08 Last updated: 2022-11-16Bibliographically approved
Hedlund, M., Lindelöf, N., Johansson, B., Boraxbekk, C.-J. & Rosendahl, E. (2019). Development and Feasibility of a Regulated, Supramaximal High-Intensity Training Program Adapted for Older Individuals. Frontiers in Physiology, 10, Article ID 590.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and Feasibility of a Regulated, Supramaximal High-Intensity Training Program Adapted for Older Individuals
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High-intensity training (HIT) with extremely short intervals (designated here as supramaximal HIT) is a time-efficient training method for health and performance. However, a protocol for regulation and control of intensity is missing, impeding implementation in various groups, such as older individuals.

Methods: This study presents the development and characteristics of a novel training protocol with regulated and controlled supramaximal intervals adapted for older people. Using both quantitative and qualitative analyses, we explored the feasibility of the program, performed in a group training setting, with physically active older individuals (aged 65–75, n = 7; five women). The developed supramaximal HIT program consisted of 10 × 6 s cycle sprint intervals with ∼1 min of active recovery with the following key characteristics: (1) an individual target power output was reached and maintained during all intervals and regulated and expressed as the percentage of the estimated maximum mean power output for the duration of the interval (i.e., 6 s); (2) pedaling cadence was standardized for all participants, while resistance was individualized; and (3) the protocol enabled controlled and systematic adjustments of training intensity following standardized escalation criteria.

Aim: Our aim was to test the feasibility of a novel training regimen with regulated and controlled supramaximal HIT, adapted for older people. The feasibility criteria for the program were to support participants in reaching a supramaximal intensity (i.e., power output > 100% of estimated VO2 max), avoid inducing a negative affective response, and have participants perceive it as feasible and acceptable.

Results: All feasibility criteria were met. The standardized escalation procedure provided safe escalation of training load up to a supramaximal intensity (around three times the power output at estimated VO2 max). The participants never reported negative affective responses, and they perceived the program as fun and feasible.

Conclusion: This novel program offers a usable methodology for further studies on supramaximal HIT among older individuals with different levels of physical capacity. Future research should explore the effects of the program in various populations of older people and their experiences and long-term adherence compared with other forms of training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
sprint interval training, high-intensity interval training, affective state, perceived exertion, training intensity, aging
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159855 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.00590 (DOI)000468572300001 ()2-s2.0-85068240254 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Granström, F., Hedlund, M., Lindström, B. & Eriksson, S. (2019). Test-retest reliability of the twenty-five-hole peg test in patients who had a stroke. BMJ Open, 9(12), Article ID e032560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Test-retest reliability of the twenty-five-hole peg test in patients who had a stroke
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e032560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Weaknesses of the nine-hole peg test include high floor effects and a result that might be difficult to interpret. In the twenty-five-hole peg test (TFHPT), the larger number of available pegs allows for the straightforward counting of the number of pegs inserted as the result. The TFHPT provides a comprehensible result and low floor effects. The objective was to assess the test-retest reliability of the TFHPT when testing persons with stroke. A particular focus was placed on the absolute reliability, as quantified by the smallest real difference (SRD). Complementary aims were to investigate possible implications for how the TFHPT should be used and for how the SRD of the TFHPT performance should be expressed.

Design: This study employed a test-retest design including three trials. The pause between trials was approximately 10-120 s.

Participants, setting and outcome measure: Thirty-one participants who had suffered a stroke were recruited from a group designated for constraint-induced movement therapy at outpatient clinics. The TFHPT result was expressed as the number of pegs inserted.

Methods: Absolute reliability was quantified by the SRD, including random and systematic error for a single trial, SRD2.1, and for an average of three trials, SRD2.3. For the SRD measures, the corresponding SRD percentage (SRD%) measure was also reported.

Results: The differences in the number of pegs necessary to detect a change in the TFHPT for SRD2.1 and SRD2.3 were 4.0 and 2.3, respectively. The corresponding SRD% values for SRD2.1 and SRD2.3 were 36.5% and 21.3%, respectively.

Conclusions: The smallest change that can be detected in the TFHPT should be just above two pegs for a test procedure including an average of three trials. The use of an average of three trials compared with a single trial substantially reduces the measurement error.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168799 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032560 (DOI)000512773400180 ()31831545 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076394171 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Tronarp, R., Nyberg, A., Hedlund, M., Häger, C., McDonough, S. & Björklund, M. (2018). Office-cycling: a promising way to raise pain thresholds and increase metabolism with minimal compromising of work performance. BioMed Research International, Article ID 5427201.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Office-cycling: a promising way to raise pain thresholds and increase metabolism with minimal compromising of work performance
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2018 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 5427201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Establishing the effects of low intensity cycling (LC), moderate intensity cycling (MC), and standing at a simulated office workstation on pain modulation, work performance, and metabolic expenditure.

Methods: 36 healthy adults (21 females), mean age 26.8 (SD 7.6) years, partook in this randomized 3 x 3 crossover trial with 75 minutes of LC on 20% of maximum aerobic power (MAP) output, 30 minutes of MC on 50% of MAP, and standing 30 minutes with 48-hour wash-out periods. Outcome measures were pain modulation (pressure pain threshold (PPT) and thermal pain threshold)), work performance (transcription, mouse pointing, and cognitive performance), and metabolic expenditure.

Results: PPTs increased in all conditions. PPT trapezius showed the highest increase after LC, 39.3 kilopascals (kPa) (15.6; 78.6), compared to MC, 17.0 kPa (2.8; 49.9), and standing, 16.8 kPa (-5.6; 39.4),p = 0.015. Transcription was reduced during LC and MC. Mouse pointing precision was best during standing and worst and slowest during MC. Cognitive performance did not differ between conditions. Metabolic expenditure rates were 1.4 (1.3; 1.7), 3.3 (2.3; 3.7), and 7.5 (5.8; 8.7) kcal/minute during standing, LC, and MC, respectively (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: LC seems to be the preferred option; it raised PPTs, more than doubled metabolic expenditure, whilst minimally influencing work performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143414 (URN)10.1155/2018/5427201 (DOI)000423319500001 ()2-s2.0-85041904614 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-22 Created: 2017-12-22 Last updated: 2024-03-22Bibliographically approved
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