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Steinvall, Anders
Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Deutschmann, M., Borgström, E., Yassin Falk, D., Steinvall, A. & Svensson, J. (2023). “It ain’t what you say. It’s the way you say it”: adapting the matched guise technique (MGT) to raise awareness of accentedness stereotyping effects among Swedish pre-service teachers. Language Awareness, 32(2), 255-277
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“It ain’t what you say. It’s the way you say it”: adapting the matched guise technique (MGT) to raise awareness of accentedness stereotyping effects among Swedish pre-service teachers
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2023 (English)In: Language Awareness, ISSN 0965-8416, E-ISSN 1747-7565, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 255-277Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study describes a pedagogic adaptation of the matched guise technique with the aim to raise linguistic self-awareness of L2 accentedness stereotyping effects among Swedish pre-service teachers. In the experiment, 290 students attending teacher training programs were exposed to one of two matched guises, representing either L1 accented Swedish, or L2 accented Swedish. Both guises were based on the same recording, but the L2 accented version had been digitally manipulated using cut-and-paste techniques in order to replicate certain vowel sounds (the [u:]-sound in particular) associated with low-prestige Swedish L2 accentedness. The findings from this experiment were then used as starting point for language awareness raising activities. Our overall results show that the L2 accented manipulated recording was evaluated more favourably than the original L1 accented recording on all investigated variables. One proposed explanation is that respondents were inadvertently influenced by so-called shifting standards effects, i.e. lower standards/expectations are being used as reference points when evaluating the L2 accented recording. This tendency, however, seemed to be less apparent among respondents with bi/multilingual linguistic identities. Following debriefing discussions based on the experiment findings, there were clear indications that respondents did become more aware of inadvertent linguistic stereotyping by participating in the activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
Keywords
L2 accentedness, Language awareness raising, linguistic stereotyping, matched guise technique, pedagogic design, reverse linguistic stereotyping
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197795 (URN)10.1080/09658416.2022.2067556 (DOI)000793085300001 ()2-s2.0-85132661870 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-07-05 Created: 2022-07-05 Last updated: 2023-09-26Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Steinvall, A. (2023). 'To my surprise, i don’t particularly like my own opinions': exploring adaptations of the 'open-guise' technique to raise sociolinguistic language awareness. Nordic Journal of English Studies, 22(1), 113-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'To my surprise, i don’t particularly like my own opinions': exploring adaptations of the 'open-guise' technique to raise sociolinguistic language awareness
2023 (English)In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The following study describes a data-driven learning scenario aimed at raising sociolinguistic awareness of matters related to gender, language and stereotyping. The design is inspired by the matched-guise technique (MGT), a quantitative data driven experimental method that has been used extensively to investigate language attitudes. In the scenario, differences in respondents’ response patterns to two gender-manipulated versions (male-female vs. female-male dyads) of the same recorded dialogue were used as a starting point for awareness-raising activities aimed at highlighting how gender stereotypes may affect perceptions of a dialogue. The main focus of the article is a comparison of the learning outcomes of two variants of the setup: a traditional undisclosed MGT-inspired setup, where the design and purpose of the experiment was kept secret until after the response phase, and a so-called open-guise design, where respondents were informed of the design and purpose of the experiment prior to the response phase. Preliminary results suggest that respondents adjust their assessments of a speaker depending on the guise, even when they know it is the same speaker they are listening to. Moreover, the open-guise design seemed to lead to greater pedagogic impact than the scenario based on the undisclosed design. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå University, 2023
Keywords
gender, language attitudes, Matched-Guise Technique (MGT), Open-Guise Technique, sociolinguistics
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-209576 (URN)10.35360/njes.797 (DOI)2-s2.0-85160632832 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-12 Created: 2023-06-12 Last updated: 2023-06-12Bibliographically approved
Sehlström, P., Waldmann, C., Steinvall, A. & Levlin, M. (2022). Swedish (L1) and English (L2) argumentative writing of upper secondary students with reading difficulties. L1-Educational Studies in Language and Literature, 22(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish (L1) and English (L2) argumentative writing of upper secondary students with reading difficulties
2022 (English)In: L1-Educational Studies in Language and Literature, ISSN 1567-6617, E-ISSN 1573-1731, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Writing has been identified as a challenge for students with reading difficulties. This study contributes to previous research by exploring argumentative writing in L1 (Swedish) and L2 (English) in a group of students with reading difficulties in upper secondary school. Participants were 19 students with typical reading, 19 students with poor decoding, and 9 students with poor comprehension. A majority of students attended vocational programmes. Written text quality was assessed by using an adapted version of Jacobs et al.'s (1981) analytic scoring scheme including content, organisation, cohesion, vocabulary, language use, spelling, and punctuation. Students with reading difficulties (regardless of reader subgroup) were found to perform poorly in all categories in both L1 and L2, with spelling being particularly challenging in L1, and cohesion, language use, spelling, and punctuation in L2. Significant differences were found between students with poor comprehension and students with typical reading in cohesion, language use and spelling in L2. Few other significant differences were identified possibly due to an overall poor writing outcome also for students with typical reading. This general poor outcome in writing is discussed in relation to previous studies on writing among students with reading difficulties and writing in vocational programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Association for Research in L1 Education (ARLE), 2022
Keywords
analytic scoring, poor comprehension, poor decoding, simple view of reading, vocational, written text quality
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-196481 (URN)10.21248/L1ESLL.2022.22.1.405 (DOI)2-s2.0-85131062606 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-03729
Available from: 2022-06-17 Created: 2022-06-17 Last updated: 2023-12-22Bibliographically approved
Hakelind, C., Steinvall, A. & Deutschmann, M. (2022). The Power of Aha! On Stimulating and Guiding Students towards Self-Awareness and Critical Reflection while Teaching about Personality Psychology and Gender Stereotypes. Psychology Learning & Teaching, 2(1), 57-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Power of Aha! On Stimulating and Guiding Students towards Self-Awareness and Critical Reflection while Teaching about Personality Psychology and Gender Stereotypes
2022 (English)In: Psychology Learning & Teaching, ISSN 1475-7257, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 57-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative study introduces a pedagogic design which addresses the challenging task of teaching and learning self-awareness and critical reflection in the teaching of psychology. The context of the study was a course in personality psychology for first year students, and the topic of interest was how the perception of personality is affected by gender stereotypes. The pedagogic design included the recording of a mixed-sex dialogue, which was then digitally altered for pitch and timbre producing two gender-switched versions of one single recording. Students were divided into two groups who listened to one of the two different voice alterations, and were given the task to rate the personality traits of male or female sounding versions of the same character. In the subsequent debriefing seminar, students were presented with the data from their ratings. These results were then used as a reference point for inter-group discussion, and later students were also asked to reflect over the activity individually in writing. A thematic analysis of their written answers indicates that this pedagogic setup, in combination with guided reflection, can be helpful to challenge students' own assumptions, aiding self-awareness and critical reflection related to stereotyping.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Critical reflection, self-awareness, gender stereotypes, personality, active learning, matched-guise technique
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-178334 (URN)10.1177/1475725720979460 (DOI)000598827900001 ()2-s2.0-85097534082 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-1972
Available from: 2021-01-12 Created: 2021-01-12 Last updated: 2022-05-31Bibliographically approved
Steinvall, A. & Street, S. (Eds.). (2021). A cultural history of color: Volume 6, In the modern age. London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cultural history of color: Volume 6, In the modern age
2021 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A Cultural History of Color in the Modern Age covers the period 1920 to the present, a time of extraordinary developments in colour science, philosophy, art, design and technologies. The expansion of products produced with synthetic dyes was accelerated by mass consumerism as artists, designers, architects, writers, theater and filmmakers made us a 'color conscious' society. This influenced what we wore, how we chose to furnish and decorate our homes, and how we responded to the vibrancy and chromatic eclecticism of contemporary visual cultures.The volume brings together research on how philosophers, scientists, linguists and artists debated color's polyvalence, its meaning to different cultures, and how it could be measured, manufactured, manipulated and enjoyed.

Color shapes an individual's experience of the world and also how society gives particular spaces, objects, and moments meaning. The 6 volume set of the Cultural History of Color examines how color has been created, traded, used, and interpreted over the last 5000 years. The themes covered in each volume are color philosophy and science; color technology and trade; power and identity; religion and ritual; body and clothing; language and psychology; literature and the performing arts; art; architecture and interiors; and artefacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021. p. 260
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181464 (URN)2-s2.0-85185998669 (Scopus ID)9781474273367 (ISBN)9781474206235 (ISBN)9781350460348 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-03-11 Created: 2021-03-11 Last updated: 2024-03-08Bibliographically approved
Vishwanatha, K., Hakelind, C., Steinvall, A., Svensson, J. & Deutschmann, M. (2021). Interpersonal complementarity and gender: Contextual influences on perception of personality. Social behavior and personality, 49(6), Article ID e9812.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interpersonal complementarity and gender: Contextual influences on perception of personality
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2021 (English)In: Social behavior and personality, ISSN 0301-2212, E-ISSN 1179-6391, Vol. 49, no 6, article id e9812Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contextual influences have long been recognized as an important factor explaining individual differences in perception of personality traits. In this study we investigated whether interpersonal complementarity creates a context for the perception of personality traits, and whether gender stereotypes play a role in the process. Participants were 205 students taking a personality psychology course. They evaluated personality traits in the context of observing an interpersonal exchange that reflected complementarity. Among the respondents, 103 made the evaluation based on a gender stereotypical exchange (dominant male-submissive female) and 102 based their evaluation on a gender counterstereotypical exchange (dominant female-submissive male). Results reveal that interpersonal context had a stronger influence on ratings of conscientiousness, openness, and emotional stability traits than it did on extraversion and agreeableness trait ratings. Furthermore, openness and conscientiousness were particularly susceptible to gender-based stereotypes in the context of interpersonal complementarity. These results suggest that both interpersonal complementarity and gender stereotypes influence the perception of personality traits, but that they do so in a way that is unique to each trait.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Journal Publishers, 2021
Keywords
Big Five personality traits, Gender stereotypes, Interpersonal complementarity, Interpersonal exchange, Perception of personality traits, Social roles
National Category
Social Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184909 (URN)10.2224/sbp.9812 (DOI)000661110100001 ()2-s2.0-85107717004 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-21 Created: 2021-06-21 Last updated: 2023-09-26Bibliographically approved
Steinvall, A. & Street, S. (2021). Introduction. In: Anders Steinvall and Sarah Street (Ed.), A cultural history of color: Volume 6, In the modern age (pp. 1-20). London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2021 (English)In: A cultural history of color: Volume 6, In the modern age / [ed] Anders Steinvall and Sarah Street, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181466 (URN)2-s2.0-85186052647 (Scopus ID)9781474273367 (ISBN)9781474206235 (ISBN)9781350460348 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-03-11 Created: 2021-03-11 Last updated: 2024-03-08Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M., Steinvall, A. & Lindvall-Östling, M. (2021). Raising awareness about gender and language among teacher-training students: A cross-cultural approach. Open Linguistics, 7(1), 666-684
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Raising awareness about gender and language among teacher-training students: A cross-cultural approach
2021 (English)In: Open Linguistics, E-ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 666-684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In accordance with the Education 2030 agenda for sustainable development goals, the aim of this study is to contribute to gender-sensitive teacher training and learning environments using matched guise-inspired methods. The article offers an account of activities aimed at raising awareness of issues related to linguistic gender stereotyping among teacher trainees in Sweden and the Seychelles. The cross-cultural comparative approach also provided an opportunity to raise students' awareness of how gender stereotyping is culture-related, and therefore may differ depending on cultural context. Results show that there seems to be significant differences in how Swedish and Seychellois teacher trainees stereotype men and women. While both groups seem to associate typically feminine linguistic behaviour with features accommodated under Cuddy et al.'s (2008, "Warmth and competence as universal dimensions of social perception: The stereotype content model and the BIAS map."Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 40, 61-149) "warmth dimension"(signalling interest, for example), behaviours typically associated with agentic behaviour and the competence dimension, such as taking space in a conversation and forcefully arguing one's case, seem to be regarded as relatively masculine in Sweden, but not in the Seychelles, arguably a result of a generally negative construction of masculinity in the Seychelles. Based on the responses from a post-survey, it is evident that a majority of those who participated in the exercise gained new insights into the mechanisms of gender stereotyping, knowledge that they also could relate to themselves and their own behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2021
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191294 (URN)10.1515/opli-2020-0181 (DOI)000718184700001 ()2-s2.0-85120001525 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-13 Created: 2022-01-13 Last updated: 2022-01-13Bibliographically approved
Lindvall-Östling, M., Deutschmann, M. & Steinvall, A. (2020). An Exploratory Study on Linguistic Gender Stereotypes and their Effects on Perception. Open Linguistics, 6(1), 567-583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Exploratory Study on Linguistic Gender Stereotypes and their Effects on Perception
2020 (English)In: Open Linguistics, ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 567-583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores how stereotypical preconceptions about gender and conversational behaviour may affect observers' perceptions of a speaker's performance. Using updated matched-guise techniques, we digitally manipulated the same recording of a conversation to alter the voice quality of "Speaker A" to sound "male" or "female." Respondents' perceptions of the conversational behaviour of Speaker A in the two guises were then measured with particular focus on floor apportionment, interruptions and signalling interest. We also measured respondents' explicit stereotypical gender preconceptions of these aspects. Results showed that respondents perceived the male guise as having more floor apportionment and interrupting more than the female guise. Results also indicated that the respondents had explicit stereotypes that matched these patterns, i.e. that interrupting and taking space were deemed to be stereotypically male behaviour, while signalling interest was deemed to be a female feature. The study suggests that stereotypical preconceptions about gender and conversational behaviour may skew perceptions of similar linguistic behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2020
Keywords
stereotyping, interactional styles, gender, perception, matched-guise
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-178557 (URN)10.1515/opli-2020-0033 (DOI)000599246100001 ()2-s2.0-85097255323 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-1972Swedish Research Council, E0197201
Available from: 2021-01-14 Created: 2021-01-14 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Deutschmann, M. & Steinvall, A. (2020). Combatting Linguistic Stereotyping and Prejudice by Evoking Stereotypes. Open Linguistics, 6(1), 651-671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combatting Linguistic Stereotyping and Prejudice by Evoking Stereotypes
2020 (English)In: Open Linguistics, ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 651-671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article offers an account of two projects conducted at Orebro University and Umea University, Sweden, which are aimed at raising awareness of issues related to linguistic stereotyping using matchedguise-inspired methods (Raising Awareness through Virtual Experiencing [RAVE] funded by the Swedish Research Council and a Cross-Cultural Perspective on Raising of Awareness through Virtual Experiencing (CRAVE) funded by the Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg foundation). We provide an overview of the methods used in university courses, with the aim to raise awareness of how stereotyping can affect our perception. We also give a more detailed account of the findings from two case activities conducted in Sweden and the Seychelles. Here the response patterns indicate that the perceived gender of a voice as well as the accent (native vs non-native) do affect respondents' judgements of performance. We were also able to show that discussions and reflections inspired by these response patterns led to raised self-awareness of matters related to language and stereotyping. The article then moves on to a critical query of our methods and also contextualizes our work in a broader discussion on methods and initiatives for how educational institutions actively can contribute to combatting (language) prejudice and discrimination in various ways.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2020
Keywords
matched guise, bias, self-awareness raising, linguistic stereotyping, reversed linguistic stereotyping, accent, gender, implicit, unconscious
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-179068 (URN)10.1515/opli-2020-0036 (DOI)000603465400001 ()2-s2.0-85099088074 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-26 Created: 2021-01-26 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
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