Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Lyon, P. (2024). A drink for all reasons: newspaper advertising for Lucozade in 1939. In: : . Paper presented at CHORD 2024 On-line Seminars on the History of Retailing and Distribution: Monday 26 February 2024. University of Wolverhampton
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A drink for all reasons: newspaper advertising for Lucozade in 1939
2024 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Lucozade is a long-established flavoured glucose drink in Britain and is traditionally associated with convalescence, helping people get over an illness, or recover from surgery. The name dates back to 1929, but the history is longer. Over the years, the narrative has changed with the most recent transformation being from sickroom drink to become a performance-enhancing sports energy drink. Thereafter, the marketing focus has been on the replacement of lost energy following activity. There was a continuing narrative of health utility but the emphasis was different: the product had been recast for consumer concerns in a new era.

However, there had been earlier, and arguably more dramatic changes to the narrative. There were two phases to this but both led to broader claims for effectiveness. Lucozade’s origins had not been as the sickroom standby, it was developed as an unbranded drink in the early 1900s and used clinically as a precaution before chloroform anaesthesia. In this, it was a pre-emptive life-saver, not something to generally aid recovery from illness. This later purpose appears to have been an accidental attribution, first gaining popular traction around Newcastle. The drink was subsequently branded, first as Glucozade in 1927 and as Lucozade in 1929, by a manufacturing by a chemist. Acquisition by Beechams in 1938 and their substantial 1939 newspaper advertising campaign gave Lucozade much wider recognition and consolidated this claim of generic utility by invoking well-established advertising ideas about tonic preparations. In the course of that year, it was portrayed as the answer to many everyday problems. General help with convalescence was still assured but now Lucozade’s effectiveness was framed as a bulwark against several ill-defined afflictions – poor appetite, nervousness, listlessness, depression and all manner of personal debility. These were terms designed to resonate with readers, the advertisements referenced problems in their lives and alluded to Lucozade’s approval by doctors and nurses. This presentation examines the scope and scale of newspaper advertising during this 1939 Lucozade campaign. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Wolverhampton: , 2024
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222987 (URN)
Conference
CHORD 2024 On-line Seminars on the History of Retailing and Distribution: Monday 26 February 2024
Available from: 2024-04-04 Created: 2024-04-04 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. (2024). Lucozade goes to war. University of Wolverhampton
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lucozade goes to war
2024 (English)Other (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, pages
University of Wolverhampton: , 2024
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-222986 (URN)
Note

Published 2024-04-03

Available from: 2024-04-04 Created: 2024-04-04 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. (2023). Tasteful advertising: Marcel Boulestin’s recipes in four trade booklets.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tasteful advertising: Marcel Boulestin’s recipes in four trade booklets
2023 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
Boulestin, culinary history
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207752 (URN)
Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. (2023). Turning point: Marcel Boulestin's 1923 Simple French Cooking for English Homes. Petits Propos Culinaires (125), 28-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turning point: Marcel Boulestin's 1923 Simple French Cooking for English Homes
2023 (English)In: Petits Propos Culinaires, ISSN 0142-4857, no 125, p. 28-52Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Prospect Books, 2023
Keywords
Boulestin, culinary history
National Category
History and Archaeology Other Social Sciences
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-207751 (URN)
Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. & Kautto, E. (2022). A healthy diet: british newspaper narratives in the 1920s. History of Retailing and Consumption, 8(2), 107-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A healthy diet: british newspaper narratives in the 1920s
2022 (English)In: History of Retailing and Consumption, ISSN 2373-518X, E-ISSN 2373-5171, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 107-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The early years of twentieth-century Britain were a transitional period for the way that food was understood. Diet adequacy was now being increasingly thought of as not simply a matter of the quantity of food but the qualities that food needed to have to sustain optimum health. A number of ‘fad diet’ books were circulating and proposed what readers should eat or avoid, and even how to eat. Science, meanwhile, was making progress with the identification of vitamins and these were added to the discourse. Newspapers in the 1920s had an important communication role in the struggle to separate dietary fact from fiction and this study examines how they represented ideas to their readers. Rather than giving a voice to ‘fad diets’, press stories endorsed the ‘common sense’ of normal varied diets although these could be socially and economically variable. Using fad ridicule and other techniques, as well as the reported opinion from well-known medical figures, newspapers emerge as responsible intermediaries in the transition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
1920s, British newspapers, fad diets, vitamins
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203112 (URN)10.1080/2373518X.2022.2129190 (DOI)2-s2.0-85139909542 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-17 Created: 2023-01-17 Last updated: 2023-06-19Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. & Kautto, E. (2021). Half the battle is fought in the kitchen: convalescence and cookery in 1920s and 1930s Britain. Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, 24(3), 345-367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Half the battle is fought in the kitchen: convalescence and cookery in 1920s and 1930s Britain
2021 (English)In: Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, ISSN 1552-8014, E-ISSN 1751-7443, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 345-367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

"Invalid food" was still widely understood in the 1920s and 1930s as a special category of food for people with chronic conditions and those who were convalescing from illness or injury. In an era when there was still limited capacity to restore full health quickly with effective treatments, even for those who had access to the best medical attention, being an invalid was often protracted. Care at home was commonplace especially for the poor in a period of significant economic and social change. Generally, the impact of nutritional science on medical education was minimal and households often turned to mass market cookery books, newspapers, and the radio for practical advice about the preparation of meals to give some benefit to the patient, or to stimulate the appetite. By reference to period materials, this article explores the nature of that advice and the transition to more targeted publications offering a greater menu range and guidance for those preparing food.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
Keywords
Food literature, invalid food, interwar, cookery, domestic care
National Category
History of Technology Food Science Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181493 (URN)10.1080/15528014.2021.1883919 (DOI)000628044000001 ()2-s2.0-85102592779 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-15 Created: 2021-03-15 Last updated: 2021-12-30Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. & Kautto, E. (2020). Care, Cookery and Commerce: Advertising Invalid Foods in 1920s-1930s Britain. In: : . Paper presented at Retailing and Distribution in the 20th Century, Virtual, September 8, 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Care, Cookery and Commerce: Advertising Invalid Foods in 1920s-1930s Britain
2020 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Serving special meals to invalids is long-established as a way to encourage better nutritional uptake and improve patient well-being. As recently as the 1920s and 1930s, the term ‘invalid food’ was still widely understood as a special category of food for people with chronic conditions, and those who were convalescing from illness or injury.

At a time when there was still limited capacity to restore full health with effective treatments, even for those who had access to the best medical attention, being an invalid was often protracted. Care at home, usually by family, was commonplace especially for poorer households in a period of substantial economic and social change. Generally, the impact of nutritional science on doctors was minimal and households often turned to mass market cookery books, newspapers and the newly-available radio for practical advice about the preparation of meals to stimulate the appetite, or to give some other benefit to the patient.

Alongside the special meals that might be prepared at home, several commercial products were advertised to improve health in some way. These classified or display advertisements were regularly seen in period newspapers and little regulation existed to ensure product safety or dietary effectiveness. However, considerable claims were made: ease of digestion and appetite stimulation were the usual selling points although sometimes the fear of inadequate domestic efforts was used to suggest the value of a consistent commercial product. For reassurance, professional endorsement suggested product usefulness for a broad range of feeding needs. This profitable invalid food market even attracted the attention of more prosaic branded goods that might be advertised also as beneficial to those with delicate appetites.

By reference to period materials, primarily cookery books and digital newspaper archives, this paper explores the problems confronted by invalid households and the role of commercial products at a time when nutritional science was developing but not widely embedded in medical education, and was even less well understood by the carers who needed to provide meals every day with little to guide them in the task.

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175574 (URN)
Conference
Retailing and Distribution in the 20th Century, Virtual, September 8, 2020
Available from: 2020-10-04 Created: 2020-10-04 Last updated: 2020-10-05Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. (2020). Dining out: restaurants and British society in the 1930s. Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, 18(3), 177-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dining out: restaurants and British society in the 1930s
2020 (English)In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, E-ISSN 1542-8044, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 177-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers the social circumstances supporting wider restaurant use and the problems encountered as this became established in 1930s Britain. A documentary research approach was used to collect the perspectives of those who witnessed, at first hand, these changes in British society and food culture. The data comprise accounts in the contemporary literature and period newspaper reports. In the 1930s, significant social and economic changes supported a much broader demand for restaurants. New types of customer were attracted and many were exposed to a cuisine which bore little relationshi pto their meals at home. Unfamiliar dishes along with a menu language and service practices derived from the traditional élite food culture created social settings offering embarrassment for the unwary. Restaurant guides and dining advice were published for those wanting to dine with greater confidence and provide insight into social attitudes at the time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
food culture, social change, restaurants, consumer market, 1930s
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153767 (URN)10.1080/15428052.2018.1552902 (DOI)000536254300002 ()2-s2.0-85057602951 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-01 Created: 2018-12-01 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. & Kautto, E. (2020). Fortnum’s for the Fickle Appetite: Lessons from a Sales Catalogue. Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution (CHORD)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fortnum’s for the Fickle Appetite: Lessons from a Sales Catalogue
2020 (English)Other (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, pages
Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution (CHORD), 2020
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175576 (URN)
Note

Published 2020-10-01

Available from: 2020-10-04 Created: 2020-10-04 Last updated: 2020-10-05Bibliographically approved
Lyon, P. (2020). Uncertain Progress: British Kitchens in the 1920S. Home Cultures, 17(3), 205-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncertain Progress: British Kitchens in the 1920S
2020 (English)In: Home Cultures, ISSN 1740-6315, E-ISSN 1751-7427, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 205-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

British domestic kitchens are a product of long evolution but went through a period of great innovation one hundred years ago. Some sections of British society started to take an interest in a space that had been largely disregarded. The “servant problem” and suburban building were factors in this changed perspective. By reference to period newspaper archives, the nature of those changes can be demonstrated in some detail. Although there was a narrative of efficiency, and design ideas from Europe and the United States, progress for British kitchens was piecemeal and conflicted by fuel-choice issues as well as the question of how to equip the space for personal use. Ideas that survived this period of experimentation were to form the basis of kitchen development in subsequent decades.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2020
Keywords
1920s, kitchen equipment, domestic space, newspaper narratives
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188613 (URN)10.1080/17406315.2021.1948164 (DOI)000707940000003 ()2-s2.0-85117123426 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-15 Created: 2021-10-15 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9357-5596

Search in DiVA

Show all publications