Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Sommarin, Marianne
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Saavedra, L., Mikami, K., Malhó, R. & Sommarin, M. (2012). PIP kinases and their role in plant tip growing cells. Plant Signalling & Behavior, 7(10), 1302-1305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PIP kinases and their role in plant tip growing cells
2012 (English)In: Plant Signalling & Behavior, ISSN 1559-2316, E-ISSN 1559-2324, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 1302-1305Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, [PtdIns(4,5)P2], is a signaling lipid involved in many important processes in animal cells such as cytoskeleton organization, intracellular vesicular trafficking, secretion, cell motility, regulation of ion channels, and nuclear signaling pathways. In the last years PtdIns(4,5)P2 and its synthesizing enzyme, phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK), has been intensively studied in plant cells, revealing a key role in the control of polar tip growth. Analysis of the PIPK members from Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Physcomitrella patens showed that they share some regulatory features with animal PIPKs but also exert plant-specific modes of regulation. This review aims at giving an overview on the PIPK family from Arabidopsis thaliana and Physcomitrella patens. Even though their basic structure, modes of activation and physiological role is evolutionary conserved, modules responsible for plasma membrane localization are distinct for different PIPKs, depending on differences in physiological and/ or developmental status of cells, such as polarized and nonpolarized. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2012
Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, Cell differentiation, Physcomitrella patens, PIPK, Tip growth
National Category
Botany Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215794 (URN)10.4161/psb.21547 (DOI)000214015900022 ()22902694 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84867476350 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-30 Created: 2023-10-30 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Thelin, L., Mutwil, M., Sommarin, M. & Persson, S. (2011). Diverging functions among calreticulin isoforms in higher plants [Letter to the editor]. Plant Signalling & Behavior, 6(6), 905-910
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diverging functions among calreticulin isoforms in higher plants
2011 (English)In: Plant Signalling & Behavior, ISSN 1559-2316, E-ISSN 1559-2324, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 905-910Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The ER chaperone calreticulin plays vital roles in numerous cellular processes, including Ca2+-homeostasis, apoptosis and cell adhesion, in animal cells. Although calreticulin has been systematically characterized in animal cells, the focus has been on one of the isoforms. However, recent advances in the plant calreticulin field have revealed functional divergence of calreticulin isoforms. While two of the plant isoforms appear to work within a general ER chaperone framework, the third isoform is associated with folding of receptors for brassinosteroids and bacterial peptides. Hence, the discovery of functional specialization of plant calreticulins opens up new vistas for calreticulins also in the animal field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2011
Keywords
Brassinosteroid, Calcium, Calreticulin, Chaperone, Efr, Pamp, Protein folding
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199626 (URN)10.4161/psb.6.6.15339 (DOI)000214009800033 ()21586899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79958251812 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Addendum to: Christensen A, Svensson K, ThelinL, Zhang W, Tintor N, Prins D, et al. Higher plantcalreticulins have acquired specialized functionsin Arabidopsis. PLoS One 2010; 5:11342; PMID:20596537; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011342.

Available from: 2022-09-26 Created: 2022-09-26 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Saavedra, L., Balbi, V., Lerche, J., Mikami, K., Heilmann, I. & Sommarin, M. (2011). PIPKs are essential for rhizoid elongation and caulonemal cell development in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The Plant Journal, 67(4), 635-647
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PIPKs are essential for rhizoid elongation and caulonemal cell development in the moss Physcomitrella patens
Show others...
2011 (English)In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 635-647Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PtdIns-4,5-bisphosphate is a lipid messenger of eukaryotic cells that plays a critical role in processes such as cytoskeleton organization, intracellular vesicular trafficking, secretion, cell motility, regulation of ion channels and nuclear signalling pathways. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) are phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs). The moss Physcomitrella patens contains two PIPKs, PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2. To study their physiological role, both genes were disrupted by targeted homologous recombination and as a result mutant plants with lower PtdIns(4,5)P(2) levels were obtained. A strong phenotype for pipk1, but not for pipk2 single knockout lines, was obtained. The pipk1 knockout lines were impaired in rhizoid and caulonemal cell elongation, whereas pipk1-2 double knockout lines showed dramatic defects in protonemal and gametophore morphology manifested by the absence of rapidly elongating caulonemal cells in the protonemal tissue, leafy gametophores with very short rhizoids, and loss of sporophyte production. pipk1 complemented by overexpression of PpPIPK1 fully restored the wild-type phenotype whereas overexpression of the inactive PpPIPK1E885A did not. Overexpression of PpPIPK2 in the pipk1-2 double knockout did not restore the wild-type phenotype demonstrating that PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2 are not functionally redundant. In vivo imaging of the cytoskeleton network revealed that the shortened caulonemal cells in the pipk1 mutants was the result of the absence of the apicobasal gradient of cortical F-actin cables normally observed in wild-type caulonemal cells. Our data indicate that both PpPIPKs play a crucial role in the development of the moss P. patens, and particularly in the regulation of tip growth.

Keywords
phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase, Physcomitrella patens, phosphoinositides, tip growth, phosphatidylinositol-4;5-bisphosphate, cytoskeleton organization
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46639 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-313X.2011.04623.x (DOI)21554449 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80051672107 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-08 Created: 2011-09-08 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Mikami, K., Saavedra, L., Hiwatashi, Y., Uji, T., Hasebe, M. & Sommarin, M. (2010). A dibasic amino acid pair conserved in the activation loop directs plasma membrane localization and is necessary for activity of plant type I/II Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase. Plant Physiology, 153(3), 1004-1015
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A dibasic amino acid pair conserved in the activation loop directs plasma membrane localization and is necessary for activity of plant type I/II Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 153, no 3, p. 1004-1015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) is an enzyme involved in the regulation of cellular levels of phosphoinositides involved in various physiological processes, such as cytoskeletal organization, ion channel activation, and vesicle trafficking. In animals, research has focused on the modes of activation and function of PIPKs, providing an understanding of the importance of plasma membrane localization. However, it still remains unclear how this issue is regulated in plant PIPKs. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain, which contains the activation loop, is sufficient for plasma membrane localization of PpPIPK1, a type I/II B PIPK from the moss Physcomitrella patens. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain for plasma membrane localization was confirmed with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtPIP5K1. Our findings, in which substitution of a conserved dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop of PpPIPK1 completely prevented plasma membrane targeting and abolished enzymatic activity, demonstrate its critical role in these processes. Placing our results in the context of studies of eukaryotic PIPKs led us to conclude that the function of the dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop in type I/II PIPKs is plant specific.

National Category
Botany
Research subject
Physiological Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37335 (URN)10.1104/pp.109.152686 (DOI)000279400200010 ()2-s2.0-77954305924 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-10-27 Created: 2010-10-27 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Christensen, A., Svensson, K., Thelin, L., Zhang, W., Tintor, N., Prins, D., . . . Persson, S. (2010). Higher plant calreticulins have acquired specialized functions in arabidopsis. PLOS ONE, 5(6), e11342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher plant calreticulins have acquired specialized functions in arabidopsis
Show others...
2010 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 6, p. e11342-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Calreticulin (CRT) is a ubiquitous ER protein involved in multiple cellular processes in animals, such as protein folding and calcium homeostasis. Like in animals, plants have evolved divergent CRTs, but their physiological functions are less understood. Arabidopsis contains three CRT proteins, where the two CRTs AtCRT1a and CRT1b represent one subgroup, and AtCRT3 a divergent member. Methodology/Principal Findings: Through expression of single Arabidopsis family members in CRT-deficient mouse fibroblasts we show that both subgroups have retained basic CRT functions, including ER Ca2+-holding potential and putative chaperone capabilities. However, other more general cellular defects due to the absence of CRT in the fibroblasts, such as cell adhesion deficiencies, were not fully restored. Furthermore, in planta expression, protein localization and mutant analyses revealed that the three Arabidopsis CRTs have acquired specialized functions. The AtCRT1a and CRT1b family members appear to be components of a general ER chaperone network. In contrast, and as recently shown, AtCRT3 is associated with immune responses, and is essential for responsiveness to the bacterial Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP) elf18, derived from elongation factor (EF)-Tu. Whereas constitutively expressed AtCRT1a fully complemented Atcrt1b mutants, AtCRT3 did not. Conclusions/Significance: We conclude that the physiological functions of the two CRT subgroups in Arabidopsis have diverged, resulting in a role for AtCRT3 in PAMP associated responses, and possibly more general chaperone functions for AtCRT1a and CRT1b.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37334 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0011342 (DOI)000279259900015 ()2-s2.0-77956223952 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-10-27 Created: 2010-10-27 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Mikami, K., Saavedra, L. & Sommarin, M. (2010). Is membrane occupation and recognition nexus domain functional in plant phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases?. Plant Signalling & Behavior, 5(10), 1241-1244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is membrane occupation and recognition nexus domain functional in plant phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases?
2010 (English)In: Plant Signalling & Behavior, ISSN 1559-2316, E-ISSN 1559-2324, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 1241-1244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) catalyzes a key step controlling cellular contents of phosphatidylinositol- 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], a critical intracellular messenger involved in vesicle trafficking and modulation of actin cytoskeleton and also a substrate of phospholipase C to produce the two intracellular messengers, diacylglycerol and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. In addition to the conserved C-terminal PIPK catalytic domain, plant PIPKs contain a unique structural feature consisting of a repeat of membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) motifs, called the MORN domain, in the N-terminal half. The MORN domain has previously been proposed to regulate plasma membrane localization and phosphatidic acid (PA)-inducible activation. Recently, the importance of the catalytic domain, but not the MORN domain, in these aspects was demonstrated. These conflicting data raise the question about the function of the MORN domain in plant PIPKs. We therefore performed analyses of PpPIPK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens to elucidate the importance of the MORN domain in the control of enzymatic activity; however, we found no effect on either enzymatic activity or activation by PA. Taken together with our previous findings of lack of function in plasma membrane localization, there is no positive evidence indicating roles of the MORN domain in enzymatic and functional regulations of PpPIPK1. Therefore, further biochemical and reverse genetic analyses are necessary to understand the biological significance of the MORN domain in plant PIPKs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Landes Bioscience, 2010
Keywords
Membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) domain, Phosphatidic acid, Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase, Physcomitrella patens
National Category
Cell Biology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214306 (URN)10.4161/psb.5.10.12922 (DOI)000214009000016 ()20855959 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-78449293220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research
Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2023-09-13Bibliographically approved
Saavedra, L., Balbi, V., Dove, S. K., Hiwatashi, Y., Mikami, K. & Sommarin, M. (2009). Characterization of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases from the moss Physcomitrella patens: PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2. Plant and Cell Physiology, 50(3), 595-609
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases from the moss Physcomitrella patens: PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2
Show others...
2009 (English)In: Plant and Cell Physiology, ISSN 0032-0781, E-ISSN 1471-9053, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 595-609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phosphoinositides (PIs) play a major role in eukaryotic cells, despite being a minor component of most membranes. This is the first report on PI metabolism in a bryophyte, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss PI composition is similar to that of other land plants growing under normal conditions. In contrast to the large number of PIPK genes present in flowering plants, the P. patens genome encodes only two type I/II PIPK genes, PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2, which are very similar at both the nucleotide and protein product levels. However, the expression of the two genes is differentially regulated, and in vitro biochemical characterization shows that the resulting enzymes have different substrate specificities. PpPIPK1 uses PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P with similar preference and also metabolizes PtdIns(3,4)P(2) to produce PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), a PI not yet detected in intact plant cells. PpPIPK2 prefers PtdIns as substrate and is much less active towards PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P. Thus, PpPIPK2 shows properties reminiscent of both PtdInsP-kinase and PtdIns-kinases. Moreover, a substitution of glutamic acid by alanine in the activation loop drastically reduced PpPIPK1 activity and altered the substrate specificity to PtdIns5P being the preferred substrate compared with PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P. These findings demonstrate that the substrate specificity of plant PIPKs is determined in a plant-specific manner, which provides new insights into the regulatory modes of PIPK activity in plants.

Keywords
Membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN); Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK); Phosphoinositide metabolism; Phosphoinositides; Physcomitrella patens, inositol phospholipid kinase; arabidopsis-thaliana; phosphatidylinositol(3, 4, 5)-trisphosphate synthesis; schizosaccharomyces-pombe; activated neutrophils; monophosphate kinase; 5-kinase; stress; pathway; acid
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22109 (URN)10.1093/pcp/pcp018 (DOI)19188261 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-63049106663 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-04-23 Created: 2009-04-23 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Christensen, A., Svensson, K., Persson, S., Jung, J., Michalak, M., Widell, S. & Sommarin, M. (2008). Functional characterization of Arabidopsis calreticulin1a: a key alleviator of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Plant and Cell Physiology, 49(6), 912-924
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional characterization of Arabidopsis calreticulin1a: a key alleviator of endoplasmic reticulum stress
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Plant and Cell Physiology, ISSN 0032-0781, E-ISSN 1471-9053, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 912-924Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chaperone calreticulin plays important roles in a variety of processes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of animal cells, such as Ca2+ signaling and protein folding. Although the functions of calreticulin are well characterized in animals, only indirect evidence is available for plants. To increase our understanding of plant calreticulins we introduced one of the Arabidopsis isoforms, AtCRT1a, into calreticulin-deficient (crt–/–) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. As a result of calreticulin deficiency, the mouse crt–/– fibroblasts have decreased levels of Ca2+ in the ER and impaired protein folding abilities. Expression of the AtCRT1a in mouse crt–/– fibroblasts rescued these phenotypes, i.e. AtCRT1a restored the Ca2+-holding capacity and chaperone functions in the ER of the mouse crt–/– fibroblasts, demonstrating that the animal sorting machinery was also functional for a plant protein, and that basic calreticulin functions are conserved across the Kingdoms. Expression analyses using a β-glucuronidase (GUS)–AtCRT1a promoter construct revealed high expression of CRT1a in root tips, floral tissues and in association with vascular bundles. To assess the impact of AtCRT1a in planta, we generated Atcrt1a mutant plants. The Atcrt1a mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to the drug tunicamycin, an inducer of the unfolded protein response. We therefore conclude that AtCRT1a is an alleviator of the tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response, and propose that the use of the mouse crt–/– fibroblasts as a calreticulin expression system may prove useful to assess functionalities of calreticulins from different species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2008
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arabidopsis/genetics/*metabolism, Calcium/metabolism, Calreticulin/chemistry/genetics/*physiology, Endoplasmic Reticulum/*metabolism, Fibroblasts/*metabolism, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression Regulation; Plant/physiology, Mice, Phylogeny, Protein Folding, Protein Isoforms, Tunicamycin/pharmacology
National Category
Forest Science Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-10575 (URN)10.1093/pcp/pcn065 (DOI)000256764900005 ()18436549 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-48849110645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-10-02 Created: 2008-10-02 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Szilágyi, A., Sommarin, M. & Akerlund, H.-E. (2007). Membrane curvature stress controls the maximal conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin in the violaxanthin cycle--influence of alpha-tocopherol, cetylethers, linolenic acid, and temperature.. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 1768(9), 2310-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Membrane curvature stress controls the maximal conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin in the violaxanthin cycle--influence of alpha-tocopherol, cetylethers, linolenic acid, and temperature.
2007 (English)In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1768, no 9, p. 2310-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Zeaxanthin, an important component in protection against overexcitation in higher plants, is formed from violaxanthin by the enzyme violaxanthin de-epoxidase. We have investigated factors that may control the maximal degree of conversion in the violaxanthin cycle. The conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin in isolated spinach thylakoids was followed at different temperatures and in the presence of lipid packing modifiers. The maximum degree of conversion was found to be 35%, 70% and 80% at 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C respectively. In the presence of membrane modifying agents, known to promote non-lamellar structures (H(II)), such as linolenic acid the conversion increased, and the maximal level of violaxanthin de-epoxidation obtained was close to 100%. In contrast, substances promoting lamellar phases (L(alpha)), such as alpha-tocopherol and 8-cetylether (C(16)EO(8)), only 55% and 35% of the violaxanthin was converted at 25 degrees C, respectively. The results are interpreted in light of the lipid composition of the thylakoid membrane, and we propose a model where a negative curvature elastic stress in the thylakoid lipid bilayer is required for violaxanthin de-epoxidase activity. In this model zeaxanthin with its longer hydrophobic stretch is proposed to promote lamellar arrangements of the membrane. As a result, zeaxanthin relieves the curvature elastic stress, which in turn leads to inactivation of violaxanthin de-epoxidase.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-18893 (URN)10.1016/j.bbamem.2007.06.001 (DOI)17618598 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-34548486245 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-02-26 Created: 2009-02-26 Last updated: 2023-03-23
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications