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Lindgren, Robert
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Hansson, A., Rankin, G., Uski, O., Sehlstedt, M., Pourazar, J., Lindgren, R., . . . Muala, A. (2023). Reduced bronchoalveolar macrophage phagocytosis and cytotoxic effects after controlled short-term exposure to wood smoke in healthy humans. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 20(1), Article ID 30.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced bronchoalveolar macrophage phagocytosis and cytotoxic effects after controlled short-term exposure to wood smoke in healthy humans
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2023 (English)In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Exposure to wood smoke has been shown to contribute to adverse respiratory health effects including airway infections, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. A preceding study failed to confirm any acute inflammation or cell influx in bronchial wash (BW) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 24 h after wood smoke exposure but showed unexpected reductions in leukocyte numbers. The present study was performed to investigate responses at an earlier phase, regarding potential development of acute inflammation, as well as indications of cytotoxicity.

Methods: In a double-blind, randomised crossover study, 14 healthy participants were exposed for 2 h to filtered air and diluted wood smoke from incomplete wood log combustion in a common wood stove with a mean particulate matter concentration of 409 µg/m3. Bronchoscopy with BW and BAL was performed 6 h after exposure. Differential cell counts, assessment of DNA-damage and ex vivo analysis of phagocytic function of phagocytosing BAL cells were performed. Wood smoke particles were also collected for in vitro toxicological analyses using bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and alveolar type II-like cells (A549).

Results: Exposure to wood smoke increased BAL lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (p = 0.04) and reduced the ex vivo alveolar macrophage phagocytic capacity (p = 0.03) and viability (p = 0.02) vs. filtered air. BAL eosinophil numbers were increased after wood smoke (p = 0.02), while other cell types were unaffected in BW and BAL. In vitro exposure to wood smoke particles confirmed increased DNA-damage, decreased metabolic activity and cell cycle disturbances.

Conclusions: Exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustion did not induce any acute airway inflammatory cell influx at 6 h, apart from eosinophils. However, there were indications of a cytotoxic reaction with increased LDH, reduced cell viability and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic capacity. These findings are in accordance with earlier bronchoscopy findings at 24 h and may provide evidence for the increased susceptibility to infections by biomass smoke exposure, reported in population-based studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Air pollution, Biomass combustion, Bronchoscopy, Controlled human exposure, Cytotoxicity, In vitro, Macrophages, Phagocytosis, Wood smoke
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-212714 (URN)10.1186/s12989-023-00541-x (DOI)37517998 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165871931 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationVästerbotten County CouncilSwedish Energy AgencyUmeå University
Available from: 2023-08-15 Created: 2023-08-15 Last updated: 2023-08-15Bibliographically approved
Mukarunyana, B., Boman, C., Kabera, T., Lindgren, R. & Fick, J. (2023). The ability of biochars from cookstoves to remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products from hospital wastewater. Environmental Technology & Innovation, 32, Article ID 103391.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ability of biochars from cookstoves to remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products from hospital wastewater
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Technology & Innovation, ISSN 2352-1864, Vol. 32, article id 103391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adequate treatment of wastewater to remove micropollutants constitutes a major concern globally. Despite this, large volumes of untreated wastewater are released into the environment, mainly due to the cost involved. Biochars have been suggested to have the potential to remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) from wastewater, but, adsorption potential needs to be investigated further. Production of biochars should also preferably be sustainable and based on low-cost materials. This study investigated the ability of nine biochars produced in three cookstoves and from three feedstocks. All biochars were characterized and then applied in adsorption experiments, based on authentic hospital effluent. Our analytical method included 32 pharmaceuticals and personal care products, and 28 of these were detected and quantified in hospital wastewater effluent samples. Some PPCP were present in relatively high concentrations (more than 24 µg/L). Adsorption experiments showed that the biochars used in the investigation had average removal rates (RR) ranging from 14.2% to 65.5%. Removal rates also varied between and within cookstoves and feedstock. Although cookstove biochars with a low surface area in this study generally showed lower removal rates, results from surface characterization were not detailed enough to correlate the physicochemical properties of the pollutants with the adsorption. Further characterizations are therefore needed to point out the most important parameters involved in PPCP adsorption on cookstove biochars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Biochar cookstove, Feedstock, Hospital wastewater, PPCPs, Removal rate
National Category
Environmental Sciences Water Treatment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215394 (URN)10.1016/j.eti.2023.103391 (DOI)2-s2.0-85173621784 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2023-10-27 Created: 2023-10-27 Last updated: 2023-10-27Bibliographically approved
Hedayati, A., Falk, J., Boren, E., Lindgren, R., Skoglund, N., Boman, C. & Öhman, M. (2022). Ash Transformation during Fixed-Bed Combustion of Agricultural Biomass with a Focus on Potassium and Phosphorus. Energy & Fuels, 36(7), 3640-3653
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ash Transformation during Fixed-Bed Combustion of Agricultural Biomass with a Focus on Potassium and Phosphorus
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2022 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 3640-3653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, ash transformation during fixed-bed combustion of different agricultural opportunity fuels was investigated with a special focus on potassium (K) and phosphorus (P). The fuel pellets were combusted in an underfed fixed-bed pellet burner. Residual ashes (bottom ash and slag) and particulate matter were collected and characterized by scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma, and ion chromatography. The interpretation of the results was supported by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. For all fuels, almost all P (>97%) was found in residual-/coarse ash fractions, while K showed different degrees of volatilization, depending on fuel composition. During combustion of poplar, which represents Ca-K-rich fuels, a carbonate melt rich in K and Ca decomposed into CaO, CO2, and gaseous K species at sufficiently high temperatures. Ca5(PO4)3OH was the main P-containing crystalline phase in the bottom ash. For wheat straw and grass, representing Si-K-rich fuels, a lower degree of K volatilization was observed than for poplar. P was found here in amorphous phosphosilicates and CaKPO4. For wheat grain residues, representing P-K-rich fuels, a high degree of both K and P retention was observed due to the interaction of K and P with the fuel-bed constituents, i.e., char, ash, and slag. The residual ash was almost completely melted and rich in P, K, and Mg. P was found in amorphous phosphates and different crystalline phases such as KMgPO4, K2CaP2O7, K2MgP2O7, and K4Mg4(P2O7)3. In general, the results therefore imply that an interaction between ash-forming elements in a single burning fuel particle and the surrounding bed ash or slag is important for the overall retention of P and K during fuel conversion in fixed-bed combustion of agricultural biomass fuels.

Keywords
Plant derived food, Redox reactions, Fuels, Particulate matter, Reaction products
National Category
Inorganic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193834 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.1c04355 (DOI)000797939400020 ()2-s2.0-85127329835 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-01613Swedish Research Council, 2016-04380Swedish Research Council, 2017-05331Swedish Energy Agency, 41875-1
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Borén, E., Lindgren, R., Carlborg, M., Skoglund, N. & Boman, C. (2022). Kaolin as fuel additive in grate combustion of biomass to mitigate ash related problems and particle emissions. In: Markus Broström (Ed.), Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on the Impact of Fuel Quality on Power Production and the Environment: . Paper presented at 28th International Conference on the Impact of Fuel Quality on Power Production and the Environment, Åre, Sweden, September 19-23, 2022. Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kaolin as fuel additive in grate combustion of biomass to mitigate ash related problems and particle emissions
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2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on the Impact of Fuel Quality on Power Production and the Environment / [ed] Markus Broström, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Umeå University , 2022Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Bioenergy is a fundamental part in sustainable development but use of novel fuel feedstocks potentiallymore sustainable may also bring associated ash-related challenges in practical operation that could bemitigated by co-conversion or additives. Kaolin, a clay mineral, is an additive known to be beneficialfor reduction of slagging tendencies and particulate matter formation in combustion of traditionalwoody-type biomass but its impact on thermal conversion of other biomasses still warrantsinvestigation. The aim of the present work is therefore to investigate how thermal conversion of atypical K-Ca-rich woody-type biomass, poplar, and a K-Si-rich annual crop, grass, is affected by kaolinaddition in fixed bed combustion. Additivation levels were calculated according to amount of alkaliintroduced with the two feedstocks, and incorporated by co-pelletization, in the case of poplar, anadditional blending d method was tested, by powder coating of pellets The results show that kaolinaddition improved the bottom ash characteristics, especially for grass, but the main differencesbetween feedstocks were found in particulate matter and flue gas composition. The particulate matterconcentrations were reduced with kaolin addition due to removal of gaseous K compounds which inturn caused higher SOx and HCl concentrations due to the lower amount of gaseous alkali for reaction.Further, initially high CO levels observed for both fuel feedstocks were reduced with the addition ofkaolin where co-pelletization with poplar proved more effective than powder coating the fuel particlesurfaces. This suggests that high concentrations of gaseous K-compounds may impact conversion ofthe carbonaceous matrix negatively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Umeå University, 2022
National Category
Energy Engineering Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199710 (URN)
Conference
28th International Conference on the Impact of Fuel Quality on Power Production and the Environment, Åre, Sweden, September 19-23, 2022
Funder
Bio4Energy
Note

Session 9. Ash Transformation. 

Proceedings published on USB. 

Available from: 2022-09-27 Created: 2022-09-27 Last updated: 2023-03-07Bibliographically approved
Hedayati, A., Lindgren, R., Skoglund, N., Boman, C., Kienzl, N. & Öhman, M. (2021). Ash Transformation during Single-Pellet Combustion of Agricultural Biomass with a Focus on Potassium and Phosphorus. Energy & Fuels, 35(2), 1449-1464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ash Transformation during Single-Pellet Combustion of Agricultural Biomass with a Focus on Potassium and Phosphorus
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2021 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 1449-1464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, ash transformation and release of critical ash-forming elements during single-pellet combustion of different types of agricultural opportunity fuels were investigated. The work focused on potassium (K) and phosphorus (P). Single pellets of poplar, wheat straw, grass, and wheat grain residues were combusted in a macro-thermogravimetric analysis reactor at three different furnace temperatures (600, 800, and 950 °C). In order to study the transformation of inorganic matters at different stages of the thermal conversion process, the residues were collected before and after full devolatilization, as well as after complete char conversion. The residual char/ash was characterized by scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma, and ion chromatography, and the interpretation of results was supported by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. During combustion of poplar, representing a Ca-K-rich woody energy crop, the main fraction of K remained in the residual ash primarily in the form of K2Ca(CO3)2 at lower temperatures and in a K-Ca-rich carbonate melt at higher temperatures. Almost all P retained in the ash and was mainly present in the form of hydroxyapatite. For the Si-K-rich agricultural biomass fuels with a minor (wheat straw) or moderate (grass) P content, the main fraction of K remained in the residual ash mostly in K-Ca-rich silicates. In general, almost all P was retained in the residual ash both in K-Ca-P-Si-rich amorphous structures, possibly in phosphosilicate-rich melts, and in crystalline forms as hydroxyapatite, CaKPO4, and calcium phosphate silicate. For the wheat grain, representing a K-P-rich fuel, the main fraction of K and P remained in the residual ash in the form of K-Mg-rich phosphates. The results showed that in general for all studied fuels, the main release of P occurred during the devolatilization stage, while the main release of K occurred during char combustion. Furthermore, less than 20% of P and 35% of K was released at the highest furnace temperature for all fuels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2021
National Category
Energy Engineering Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-180458 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.0c03324 (DOI)000613197300044 ()2-s2.0-85100036140 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-18 Created: 2021-02-18 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Kristensen, T. B., Falk, J., Lindgren, R., Andersen, C., Malmborg, V. B., Eriksson, A. C., . . . Svenningsson, B. (2021). Properties and emission factors of cloud condensation nuclei from biomass cookstoves - Observations of a strong dependency on potassium content in the fuel. Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, 21(10), 8023-8044
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Properties and emission factors of cloud condensation nuclei from biomass cookstoves - Observations of a strong dependency on potassium content in the fuel
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2021 (English)In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 8023-8044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Residential biomass combustion is a significant source of aerosol particles on regional and global scales influencing climate and human health. The main objective of the current study was to investigate the properties of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emitted from biomass burning of solid fuels in different cookstoves mostly of relevance to sub- Saharan east Africa.

The traditional three-stone fire and a rocket stove were used for combustion of wood logs of Sesbania and Casuarina with birch used as a reference. A natural draft and a forced-draft pellet stove were used for combustion of pelletised Sesbania and pelletised Swedish softwood alone or in mixtures with pelletised coffee husk, rice husk or water hyacinth. The CCN activity and the effective density were measured for particles with mobility diameters of v65, v100 and v200 nm, respectively, and occasionally for 350 nm particles. Particle number size distributions were measured online with a fast particle analyser. The chemical composition of the fuel ash was measured by application of standard protocols.

The average particle number size distributions were by number typically dominated by an ultrafine mode, and in most cases a soot mode was centred around a mobility diameter of v150 nm. The CCN activities decreased with increasing particle size for all experiments and ranged in terms of the hygroscopicity parameter, from v0:1 to v0:8 for the ultrafine mode and from v0:001 to v0:15 for the soot mode. The CCN activity of the ultrafine mode increased (i) with increasing combustion temperature for a given fuel, and (ii) it typically increased with increasing potassium concentration in the investigated fuels. The primary CCN and the estimated particulate matter (PM) emission factors were typically found to increase significantly with increasing potassium concentration in the fuel for a given stove. In order to link CCN emission factors to PM emission factors, knowledge about stove technology, stove operation and the inorganic fuel ash composition is needed. This complicates the use of ambient PM levels alone for estimation of CCN concentrations in regions dominated by biomass combustion aerosol, with the relation turning even more complex when accounting for atmospheric ageing of the aerosol.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nicolaus Copernicus University Press, 2021
National Category
Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184206 (URN)10.5194/acp-21-8023-2021 (DOI)000657139000001 ()2-s2.0-85106885614 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05016Swedish Research Council, 2018- 04200Swedish Research Council Formas, 2015-992Swedish Research Council Formas, 2015-1385Swedish Research Council FormasThe Kempe Foundations, JCK-1516Bio4Energy
Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Carvalho, R. L., Yadav, P., García-López, N., Lindgren, R., Nyberg, G., Diaz-Chavez, R., . . . Athanassiadis, D. (2020). Environmental Sustainability of Bioenergy Strategies in Western Kenya to Address Household Air Pollution. Energies, 13(3), Article ID 719.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Sustainability of Bioenergy Strategies in Western Kenya to Address Household Air Pollution
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2020 (English)In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 719Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over 640 million people in Africa are expected to rely on solid-fuels for cooking by 2040. In Western Kenya, cooking inefficiently persists as a major cause of burden of disease due to household air pollution. Efficient biomass cooking is a local-based renewable energy solution to address this issue. The Life-Cycle Assessment tool Simapro 8.5 is applied for analyzing the environmental impact of four biomass cooking strategies for the Kisumu County, with analysis based on a previous energy modelling study, and literature and background data from the Ecoinvent and Agrifootprint databases applied to the region. A Business-As-Usual scenario (BAU) considers the trends in energy use until 2035. Transition scenarios to Improved Cookstoves (ICS), Pellet-fired Gasifier Stoves (PGS) and Biogas Stoves (BGS) consider the transition to wood-logs, biomass pellets and biogas, respectively. An Integrated (INT) scenario evaluates a mix of the ICS, PGS and BGS. In the BGS, the available biomass waste is sufficient to be upcycled and fulfill cooking demands by 2035. This scenario has the lowest impact on all impact categories analyzed followed by the PGS and INT. Further work should address a detailed socio-economic analysis of the analyzed scenarios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
agroforestry, waste valorization, sustainable development goals, renewable energy, bioenergy transitions, circular bioeconomy, clean cooking, life-cycle assessment, energy policy
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170012 (URN)10.3390/en13030719 (DOI)000522489000212 ()2-s2.0-85079543499 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2020-05-05 Created: 2020-05-05 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Erlandsson, L., Lindgren, R., Nääv, Å., Krais, A. M., Strandberg, B., Lundh, T., . . . Malmqvist, E. (2020). Exposure to wood smoke particles leads to inflammation, disrupted proliferation and damage to cellular structures in a human first trimester trophoblast cell line. Environmental Pollution, 264, Article ID 114790.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure to wood smoke particles leads to inflammation, disrupted proliferation and damage to cellular structures in a human first trimester trophoblast cell line
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2020 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 264, article id 114790Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ongoing transition to renewable fuel sources has led to increased use of wood and other biomass fuels. The physiochemical characteristics of biomass combustion derived aerosols depends on appliances, fuel and operation procedures, and particles generated during incomplete combustion are linked to toxicity. Frequent indoor wood burning is related to severe health problems such as negative effects on airways and inflammation, as well as chronic hypoxia and pathological changes in placentas, adverse pregnancy outcome, preterm delivery and increased risk of preeclampsia. The presence of combustion-derived black carbon particles at both the maternal and fetal side of placentas suggests that particles can reach the fetus. Air pollution particles have also been shown to inhibit trophoblast migration and invasion, which are vital functions for the development of the placenta during the first trimester. In this study we exposed a placental first trimester trophoblast cell line to wood smoke particles emitted under Nominal Burn rate (NB) or High Burn rate (HB). The particles were visible inside exposed cells and localized to the mitochondria, causing ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Exposed cells showed decreased secretion of the pregnancy marker human chorionic gonadotropin, increased secretion of IL-6, disrupted membrane integrity, disrupted proliferation and contained specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the particles. Taken together, these results suggest that wood smoke particles can enter trophoblasts and have detrimental effects early in pregnancy by disrupting critical trophoblast functions needed for normal placenta development and function. This could contribute to the underlying mechanisms leading to pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, premature birth, preeclampsia and/or fetal growth restriction. This study support the general recommendation that more efficient combustion technologies and burning practices should be adopted to reduce some of the toxicity generated during wood burning. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Wood burning, PAHs, Placenta, Trophoblast, Cytotoxicity, Mitochondria
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173313 (URN)10.1016/j.envpol.2020.114790 (DOI)000540263400106 ()32417587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084486194 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00572Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-3802
Available from: 2020-07-03 Created: 2020-07-03 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Korhonen, K., Kristensen, T. B., Falk, J., Lindgren, R., Andersen, C., Carvalho, R. L., . . . Virtanen, A. (2020). Ice-nucleating ability of particulate emissions from solid-biomass-fired cookstoves: an experimental study. Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, 20(8), 4951-4968
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ice-nucleating ability of particulate emissions from solid-biomass-fired cookstoves: an experimental study
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2020 (English)In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 4951-4968Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research was part of the Salutary Umea Study of Aerosols in Biomass Cookstove Emissions (SUSTAINE) laboratory experiment campaign. We studied ice-nucleating abilities of particulate emissions from solid-fuel-burning cookstoves, using a portable ice nuclei counter, Spectrometer Ice Nuclei (SPIN). These emissions were generated from two traditional cookstove types commonly used for household cooking in sub-Saharan Africa and two advanced gasifier stoves under research to promote sustainable development alternatives. The solid fuels studied included biomass from two different African tree species, Swedish softwood and agricultural residue products relevant to the region. Measurements were performed with a modified version of the standard water boiling test on polydisperse samples from flue gas during burning and size-selected accumulation mode soot particles from a 15 m(3) aerosol-storage chamber. The studied soot particle sizes in nanometers were 250, 260, 300, 350, 400, 450 and 500. From this chamber, the particles were introduced to water-supersaturated freezing conditions (-32 to -43 degrees) in the SPIN. Accumulation mode soot particles generally produced an ice-activated fraction of 10 3 in temperatures 1-1.5 degrees C higher than that required for homogeneous freezing at fixed RHw = 115 %. In five special experiments, the combustion performance of one cookstove was intentionally modified. Two of these exhibited a significant increase in the ice-nucleating ability of the particles, resulting in a 10(3) ice activation at temperatures up to 5.9 degrees C higher than homogeneous freezing and the observed increased ice-nucleating ability. We investigated six different physico-chemical properties of the emission particles but found no clear correlation between them and increasing ice-nucleating ability. We conclude that the freshly emitted combustion aerosols form ice via immersion and condensation freezing at temperatures only moderately above homogeneous freezing conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nicolaus Copernicus University Press, 2020
National Category
Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170825 (URN)10.5194/acp-20-4951-2020 (DOI)000529394700004 ()2-s2.0-85084222985 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-1385Swedish Research Council Formas, 2015-992Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-01023Swedish Research Council, 2017-05016Swedish Research Council, 2018-04200Swedish Research Council, 2013-05021The Kempe Foundations, JCK-1516Bio4Energy
Available from: 2020-05-25 Created: 2020-05-25 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Carvalho, R. L., Yadav, P., Lindgren, R., García-López, N., Nyberg, G., Diaz-Chavez, R., . . . Athanassiadis, D. (2019). Bioenergy strategies to address deforestation and household air pollution in western Kenya. In: European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Proceedings: . Paper presented at 27th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, EUBCE 2019, Lisbon, Portugal, May 27-30, 2019 (pp. 1536-1542). ETA-Florence Renewable Energies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioenergy strategies to address deforestation and household air pollution in western Kenya
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2019 (English)In: European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Proceedings, ETA-Florence Renewable Energies , 2019, p. 1536-1542Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over 640 million people in Africa are expected to rely on solid-fuels for cooking by 2040. In Western Kenya, cooking inefficiently persists as a major cause of burden disease due to household air pollution. The Long-Range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) system and the Life-Cycle Assessment tool Simapro 8.5 were applied for analyzing biomass strategies for the region. The calculation of the residential energy consumption and emissions was based on scientific reviews and original data from experimental studies. The research shows the effect of four biomass strategies on the reduction of wood fuel use and short-lived climate pollutant emissions. A Business As Usual scenario (BAU) considered the trends in energy use until 2035. Transition scenarios to Improved Cookstoves (ICS), Pellet-fired Gasifier Stoves (PGS) and Biogas Stoves (BGS) considered the transition to wood-logs, biomass pellets and biogas, respectively. An Integrated (INT) scenario evaluated a mix of the ICS, PGS and BGS. The study shows that, energy use will increase by 8% (BGS), 20% (INT), 26% (PGS), 42% (ICS) and 56% (BAU). The BGS has the lowest impact on global warming, particle formation, terrestrial acidification, fossil resource scarcity, water consumption, as well as on eutrophication followed by the PGS and INT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ETA-Florence Renewable Energies, 2019
Series
European biomass conference and exhibition proceedings, E-ISSN 2282-5819
Keywords
Agroforestry, Bioenergy transitions, Clean cooking, Energy policy, Life-cycle assessment, Solid-biofuels
National Category
Bioenergy Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203424 (URN)2-s2.0-85071068129 (Scopus ID)
Conference
27th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, EUBCE 2019, Lisbon, Portugal, May 27-30, 2019
Available from: 2023-01-18 Created: 2023-01-18 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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