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Kabele, Mikael
Alternative names
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Antoniewicz, L., Kabele, M., Nilsson, U., Pourazar, J., Rankin, G., Bosson, J. A. & Lundbäck, M. (2022). Chronic snus use in healthy males alters endothelial function and increases arterial stiffness. PLOS ONE, 17(6), Article ID e0268746.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic snus use in healthy males alters endothelial function and increases arterial stiffness
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2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 6, article id e0268746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Snus usage is commonly touted as a safer alternative to cigarette smoking. However, recent studies have demonstrated possible adverse cardiovascular effects in chronic snus users. The present study evaluates the effects of chronic snus use on vascular function by assessing central arterial stiffness and endothelial vasodilatory function in healthy chronic snus users as compared to matched non-users.

Methods and results: Fifty healthy males (24 snus users, 26 age-matched controls) with a mean age of 44 years were included in the study. Arterial stiffness was assessed employing both pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis. Endothelial vasodilatory function was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography, utilizing intra-arterial administration of acetylcholine, glyceryl trinitrate and bradykinin to further gauge endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilatory function. Arterial stiffness was significantly higher in chronic snus users as compared to controls: pulse wave velocity [m/s]: 6.6±0.8 vs 7.1±0.9 resp. (p = 0.026), augmentation index corrected for heart rate [%]: 0.1±13.2 vs 7.3±7.8 resp. (p = 0.023). Endothelial independent vasodilation, i.e. the reaction to glyceryl trinitrate, was significantly lower in snus users as measured by venous occlusion plethysmography.

Conclusions: The results of this study show an increased arterial stiffness and an underlying endothelial dysfunction in daily snus users as compared to matched non-tobacco controls. These findings indicate that long-term use of snus may alter the function of the endothelium and therefore reinforces the assertion that chronic snus use is correlated to an increased risk of development of cardiovascular disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203175 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0268746 (DOI)000832307900135 ()35657943 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85131702456 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Swedish Heart and Lung AssociationVästerbotten County CouncilSwedish Heart Lung FoundationKarolinska InstituteStockholm County CouncilUmeå UniversityMagnus Bergvall FoundationSwedish Society of Medicine
Available from: 2023-01-16 Created: 2023-01-16 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Unosson, J., Kabele, M., Boman, C., Nyström, R., Sadiktsis, I., Westerholm, R., . . . Bosson, J. A. (2021). Acute cardiovascular effects of controlled exposure to dilute Petrodiesel and biodiesel exhaust in healthy volunteers: a crossover study. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 18(1), Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute cardiovascular effects of controlled exposure to dilute Petrodiesel and biodiesel exhaust in healthy volunteers: a crossover study
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2021 (English)In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Air pollution derived from combustion is associated with considerable cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality in addition to environmental effects. Replacing petrodiesel with biodiesel may have ecological benefits, but impacts on human health remain unquantified.

The objective was to compare acute cardiovascular effects of blended and pure biodiesel exhaust exposure against known adverse effects of petrodiesel exhaust (PDE) exposure in human subjects.

In two randomized controlled double-blind crossover studies, healthy volunteers were exposed to PDE or biodiesel exhaust for one hour. In study one, 16 subjects were exposed, on separate occasions, to PDE and 30% rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel blend (RME30) exhaust, aiming at PM10 300 μg/m3. In study two, 19 male subjects were separately exposed to PDE and exhaust from a 100% RME fuel (RME100) using similar engine load and exhaust dilution. Generated exhaust was analyzed for physicochemical composition and oxidative potential. Following exposure, vascular endothelial function was assessed using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography and ex vivo thrombus formation was assessed using a Badimon chamber model of acute arterial injury. Biomarkers of inflammation, platelet activation and fibrinolysis were measured in the blood.

Results: In study 1, PDE and RME30 exposures were at comparable PM levels (314 ± 27 μg/m3; (PM10 ± SD) and 309 ± 30 μg/m3 respectively), whereas in study 2, the PDE exposure concentrations remained similar (310 ± 34 μg/m3), but RME100 levels were lower in PM (165 ± 16 μg/m3) and PAHs, but higher in particle number concentration. Compared to PDE, PM from RME had less oxidative potential. Forearm infusion of the vasodilators acetylcholine, bradykinin, sodium nitroprusside and verapamil resulted in dose-dependent increases in blood flow after all exposures. Vasodilatation and ex vivo thrombus formation were similar following exposure to exhaust from petrodiesel and the two biodiesel formulations (RME30 and RME100). There were no significant differences in blood biomarkers or exhaled nitric oxide levels between exposures.

Conclusions: Despite differences in PM composition and particle reactivity, controlled exposure to biodiesel exhaust was associated with similar cardiovascular effects to PDE. We suggest that the potential adverse health effects of biodiesel fuel emissions should be taken into account when evaluating future fuel policies.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01337882/NCT01883466. Date of first enrollment March 11, 2011, registered April 19, 2011, i.e. retrospectively registered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2021
Keywords
Air pollution, Biodiesel, Cardiovascular system, Diesel, Endothelial function, Particulate matter, Thrombosis, Vascular function, Vasomotor dysfunction
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186143 (URN)10.1186/s12989-021-00412-3 (DOI)000661490800001 ()34127003 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107933281 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA InsuranceSwedish Heart Lung FoundationWellcome trust, WT103782AIARegion Västerbotten
Available from: 2021-07-14 Created: 2021-07-14 Last updated: 2024-07-02Bibliographically approved
Rankin, G. D., Kabéle, M., Brown, R., Macefield, V. G., Sandström, T. & Bosson, J. A. (2021). Acute Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Increases Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Humans. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, 10(10), Article ID e018448.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Increases Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Humans
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2021 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e018448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Diesel exhaust (DE) emissions are a major contributor to ambient air pollution and are strongly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Exposure to traffic-related particulate matter is linked with acute adverse cardiovascular events; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the role of the autonomic nervous system during exposure to DE that has previously only been indirectly investigated.

Methods and Results: Using microneurography, we measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) directly in the peroneal nerve of 16 healthy individuals. MSNA, heart rate, and respiration were recorded while subjects rested breathing filtered air, filtered air with an exposure mask, and standardized diluted DE (300 µg/m3) through the exposure mask. Heart rate variability was assessed from an ECG. DE inhalation rapidly causes an increase in number of MSNA bursts as well as the size of bursts within 10 minutes, peaking by 30 minutes (P<0.001), compared with baseline filtered air with an exposure mask. No significant changes occurred in heart rate variability indices during DE exposure; however, MSNA frequency correlated negatively with total power (r2=0.294, P=0.03) and low frequency (r2=0.258, P=0.045). Heart rate correlated positively with MSNA frequency (r2=0.268, P=0.04) and the change in percentage of larger bursts (burst amplitude, height >50% of the maximum burst) from filtered air with an exposure mask (r2=0.368, P=0.013).

Conclusions: Our study provides direct evidence for the rapid modulation of the autonomic nervous system after exposure to DE, with an increase in MSNA. The quick increase in sympathetic outflow may explain the strong epidemiological data associating traffic-related particulate matter to acute adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction.

Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT02892279.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2021
Keywords
air pollution, autonomic nervous system, diesel, heart rate variability, muscle sympathetic nerve activity, sympatho‐excitation
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183918 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.120.018448 (DOI)000651436300025 ()33942621 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85106552074 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2021-06-04 Created: 2021-06-04 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Rankin, G., Kabele, M., Sandström, T., Brown, R., Macefield, V. G. & Bosson, J. A. (2018). Diesel exhaust exposure increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity Study: a human exposure. Paper presented at International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society, MAY 18-23, 2018, San Diego, CA. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diesel exhaust exposure increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity Study: a human exposure
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 197Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Thoraric Society, 2018
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154091 (URN)000449980303080 ()
Conference
International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society, MAY 18-23, 2018, San Diego, CA
Funder
Västerbotten County CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Antoniewicz, L., Kabele, M., Lundback, M. & Bosson, J. A. (2017). Increased Arterial Stiffness In Chronic Swedish Snus Users. Paper presented at International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), MAY 19-24, 2017, Washington, AFGHANISTAN. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased Arterial Stiffness In Chronic Swedish Snus Users
2017 (English)In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 195Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136347 (URN)000400372502372 ()
Conference
International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), MAY 19-24, 2017, Washington, AFGHANISTAN
Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-16 Last updated: 2020-05-14Bibliographically approved
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