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Income distribution in family networks by gender and proximity
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2014-7179
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9587-9000
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
2020 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 26, no 7, article id e2373Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whereas the significance of family networks for support and well‐being has been shown in previous research, few studies have analysed the income distribution within family networks. The aim of this study is to examine income distribution within family networks and how they have changed over time for women and men in different parts of the income distribution and if the incomes are more similar in the geographically proximate family network. The analysis is based on register data and by use of ordinary least squares (OLS) and quantile regressions. The results indicate that men in the lowest income group tend to have become more similar to their family network over time. Gender differences have decreased, possibly as an effect of women's higher labour market participation rate leading to decreased income disparity. This paper contributes by highlighting how the uneven distribution of economic resources in family networks adds to individual's own resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020. Vol. 26, no 7, article id e2373
Keywords [en]
family networks, income distribution, proximity, gender, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-173958DOI: 10.1002/psp.2373ISI: 000554417100001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85088840017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-173958DiVA, id: diva2:1457125
Part of project
Family networks, lifestyle and health, Riksbankens JubileumsfondAvailable from: 2020-08-10 Created: 2020-08-10 Last updated: 2021-01-07Bibliographically approved

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Lundholm, EmmaSandow, ErikaMalmberg, Gunnar

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