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Academic Writing, Scholarly Identity, Voice and The Benefits and Challenges of Multilingualism: Reflections from Norwegian Doctoral Researchers in Teacher Education
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8319-0193
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9091-6458
2020 (English)In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 60, article id 100883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Doctoral researchers increasingly write in English where English is a non-ambient language, for example, in Norway. Yet, similar to other contexts, a goal of the Norwegian doctoral degree is that doctoral graduates are able to communicate their research in both national and international contexts, which usually means English. Through narrative analysis of 17 responses from doctoral researchers to a prompt asking about their journeys into academic writing, this article explores perceptions of how multilingualism and academic writing intersect with the emerging identities and voices of doctoral researchers as researchers. In these written narratives, doctoral researchers reflected upon previous experience and academia; audience and choice of language; voice, academic writing, and the perception of linguistic deficit; and academic writing conventions and language. While much previous research has focused on the negative aspects of multilingual and professional identities as academic writers, our narratives reveal how some doctoral researchers use their experiences to create productive strategies and resources. One key finding is that doctoral researchers create virtual transnational communities through their multilingual academic writing, both in terms of academic publishing and social media platforms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020. Vol. 60, article id 100883
Keywords [en]
higher education, narrative, teacher education, second language writing, doctoral studies, non-ambient, virtual transnational communities
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Specific Languages Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175501DOI: 10.1016/j.linged.2020.100883ISI: 000595307500005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85092215980OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-175501DiVA, id: diva2:1474845
Available from: 2020-10-10 Created: 2020-10-10 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Langum, VirginiaSullivan, Kirk P H

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
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  • asciidoc
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