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Cortico-cortical connectivity behind acoustic information transfer to mouse orbitofrontal cortex is sensitive to neuromodulation and displays local sensory gating: relevance in disorders with auditory hallucinations?
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
2021 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, ISSN 1180-4882, E-ISSN 1488-2434, Vol. 46, no 3, p. E371-E387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Auditory hallucinations (which occur when the distinction between thoughts and perceptions is blurred) are common in psychotic disorders. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) may be implicated, because it receives multiple inputs, including sound and affective value via the amygdala, orchestrating complex emotional responses. We aimed to elucidate the circuit and neuromodulatory mechanisms that underlie the processing of emotionally salient auditory stimuli in the OFC — mechanisms that may be involved in auditory hallucinations. Methods: We identified the cortico-cortical connectivity conveying auditory information to the mouse OFC; its sensitivity to neuromodulators involved in psychosis and postpartum depression, such as dopamine and neurosteroids; and its sensitivity to sensory gating (defective in dysexecutive syndromes). Results: Retrograde tracers in OFC revealed input cells in all auditory cortices. Acoustic responses were abolished by pharmacological and chemogenetic inactivation of the above-identified pathway. Acoustic responses in the OFC were reduced by local dopaminergic agonists and neurosteroids. Noticeably, apomorphine action lasted longer in the OFC than in auditory areas, and its effect was modality-specific (augmentation for visual responses), whereas neurosteroid action was sex-specific. Finally, acoustic responses in the OFC reverberated to the auditory association cortex via feedback connections and displayed sensory gating, a phenomenon of local origin, given that it was not detectable in input auditory cortices. Limitations: Although our findings were for mice, connectivity and sensitivity to neuromodulation are conserved across mammals. Conclusion: The corticocortical loop from the auditory association cortex to the OFC is dramatically sensitive to dopamine and neurosteroids. This suggests a clinically testable circuit behind auditory hallucinations. The function of OFC input–output circuits can be studied in mice with targeted and clinically relevant mutations related to their response to emotionally salient sounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Medical Association (CMA) , 2021. Vol. 46, no 3, p. E371-E387
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-184452DOI: 10.1503/jpn.200131ISI: 000743686000007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85107241570OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-184452DiVA, id: diva2:1567990
Available from: 2021-06-17 Created: 2021-06-17 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Tripathi, AnushreeSulis Sato, SebastianMedini, Paolo

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