Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Assessing exposure of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in car cabins: Current understanding and future challenges in developing a standardized methodology
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Sustainability Centre, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Sustainability Centre, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Bioeconomy and Health, Department Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development, Unit Chemical and Pharmaceutical Safety, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
2021 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 157, article id 106847Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be found in air, dust and on surfaces in car cabins, leading to exposure to humans via dust ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact. This review aims at describing current understanding concerning sampling, levels, and human exposure of SVOCs from car cabin environments. To date, several different methods are used to sample SVOCs in car cabin air and dust and there are no standard operating procedures for sampling SVOCs in cars detailed in the literature. The meta-analysis of SVOCs in car cabin air and dust shows that brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been most frequently studied, primarily focusing on concentrations in dust. In dust, detected concentrations span over three to seven orders of magnitude, with highest median concentrations for OPFRs, followed by BFRs and, thereafter, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In air, the variation is smaller, spanning over one to three orders of magnitude, with phthalates and siloxanes having the highest median concentrations, followed by OPFRs, fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and BFRs. Assessments of human exposures to SVOCs in cars have, so far, mainly focused on external exposure, most often only studying one exposure route, primarily via dust ingestion. In order to perform relevant and complete assessments of human exposure to SVOCs in cars, we suggest broadening the scope to which SVOCs should be studied, promoting more comprehensive external exposure assessments that consider exposure via all relevant exposure routes and making comparisons of external and internal exposure, in order to understand the importance of in-car exposure as a source of SVOC exposure. We also suggest a new sampling approach that includes sampling of SVOCs in both car cabin air and dust, aiming to reduce variability in data due to differences in sampling techniques and protocols.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021. Vol. 157, article id 106847
Keywords [en]
Air, Automotive, Car, Dust, Human exposure, Indoor, Sampling, SVOC
National Category
Environmental Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187286DOI: 10.1016/j.envint.2021.106847ISI: 000704052800009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85113998683OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-187286DiVA, id: diva2:1591898
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 44015-1Available from: 2021-09-07 Created: 2021-09-07 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(722 kB)218 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 722 kBChecksum SHA-512
8627757f2449db7f2105c09c9ee4e6c574625f578236ec2be4aa0209d2beb9f23e2daf2dfb1c31e22f57ebf7882deb6cc17a911b5d851aa87fbfd41823bd6170
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Lexén, JennyAndersson, Patrik L.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lexén, JennyAndersson, Patrik L.
By organisation
Department of Chemistry
In the same journal
Environment International
Environmental SciencesOccupational Health and Environmental Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 218 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 538 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf