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A kaleidoscope of photosynthetic antenna proteins and their emerging roles
Department of Biophysics, Centre of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; Electron microscopy group, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9589-3312
Queen Mary University of London, School of Biological and Behavioural Sciences, London, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6444-4952
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3858-4606
Department of Physics and Astronomy and LaserLaB, Faculty of Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1184-6530
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2022 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 189, no 3, p. 1204-1219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae are pigment-binding proteins that perform one of the most fundamental tasks on Earth, capturing light and transferring energy that enables life in our biosphere. Adaptation to different light environments led to the evolution of an astonishing diversity of light-harvesting systems. At the same time, several strategies have been developed to optimize the light energy input into photosynthetic membranes in response to fluctuating conditions. The basic feature of these prompt responses is the dynamic nature of antenna complexes, whose function readily adapts to the light available. High-resolution microscopy and spectroscopic studies on membrane dynamics demonstrate the crosstalk between antennae and other thylakoid membrane components. With the increased understanding of light-harvesting mechanisms and their regulation, efforts are focusing on the development of sustainable processes for effective conversion of sunlight into functional bio-products. The major challenge in this approach lies in the application of fundamental discoveries in light-harvesting systems for the improvement of plant or algal photosynthesis. Here, we underline some of the latest fundamental discoveries on the molecular mechanisms and regulation of light harvesting that can potentially be exploited for the optimization of photosynthesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022. Vol. 189, no 3, p. 1204-1219
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-194031DOI: 10.1093/plphys/kiac175ISI: 000790909500001PubMedID: 35512089Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85133103283OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-194031DiVA, id: diva2:1653569
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 675006Available from: 2022-04-22 Created: 2022-04-22 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. How could Christmas trees remain evergreen?: photosynthetic acclimation of Scots pine and Norway spruce needles during winter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How could Christmas trees remain evergreen?: photosynthetic acclimation of Scots pine and Norway spruce needles during winter
2022 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Hur kan julgranen vara grön? : fotosyntesapparatens anpassning till vinterförhållanden hos tall och gran
Abstract [en]

Plants and other green organisms harvest sunlight by green chlorophyll pigments and covertit to chemical energy (sugars) and oxygen in a process called photosynthesis providing the foundation for life on Earth. Although it is unanimously believed that oceanic phytoplanktons are the main contributors to the global photosynthesis, the contribution of coniferous boreal forests distributed across vast regions of the northern hemisphere cannot be undermined. Hence boreal forests account signifificantly for social, economical and environmental sustainability. Not only do conifers thrive in the tundra regions with extreme climate, but they also maintain their needles green over the boreal winter. A question remains; what makes them so resilient? In this respect, we aimed to understand the remarkable winter adaptation strategies in two dominant boreal coniferous species,i.e., Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies. First, we mapped the transcriptional landscape in Norway spruce (Picea abies) needles over the annual cycle. Transcriptional changes in the nascent needles reflflected a sequence of developmental processes and active vegetative growth during early summer and summer. Later after maturation, transcriptome reflflected activated defense against biotic factors and acclimationin response to abiotic environmental cues such as freezing temperatures during winter. Secondly, by monitoring the photosynthetic performance of Scot pine needles, we found that the trees face extreme stress during the early spring (Feb-Mar) when sub-zero temperatures are accompanied by high solar radiation. At this time, drastic changes occur in the thylakoid membranes of the chloroplast that allows the mixing of photosystem I and photosystem II that typically remain laterally segregated. This triggers direct energy transfer from PSII to PSI and thus protects PSII from damage. Furthermore, we found that this loss of lateral segregation may be a consequence of triple phosphorylationof Lhcb1 (Light harvesting complex1 of photosystem II). The structural changes in thylakoid membranes also lead to changes inthe thylakoid macro domain organisationand pigment protein composition. Furthermore, we discovered that while PSII is protected by direct energy transfer, the protection of PSI is provided through photoreduction of oxygen by flavodiiron proteins, which in turn allows P700 to stay in an oxidised state necessary for direct energy transfer. These coordinated cascades of changes concomitantly protect both PSI and PSII to maintain the needles green over the winter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2022. p. 65
Keywords
Scots Pine, Norway spruce, Photosynthesis, Winter adaptation
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Botany Biophysics Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
biological chemistry; biology; Molecular Biology; Physiological Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-194032 (URN)978-91-7855-788-2 (ISBN)978-91-7855-787-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2022-05-20, Lilla hörsalen, KBC huset, Umeå, 09:30 (English)
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Note

On page 12, List of papers, manuscripts (in preparation): Athor names hidden due to copyright - see printed version. 

Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-22 Last updated: 2022-05-06Bibliographically approved

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Bag, PushanJansson, Stefan

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Arshad, RameezSaccon, FrancescoBag, PushanBiswas, AvratanuCalvaruso, ClaudioGrebe, SteffenMascoli, VincenzoMuzzopappa, FernandoSchiphorst, ChristoSorrentino, Mirellavan Amerongen, HerbertAro, Eva-MariBassi, RobertoCroce, Robertavan Grondelle, RienkJansson, StefanKirilovsky, DianaKouřil, RomanMullineaux, Conrad W.Panzarová, KláraRobert, BrunoRuban, Alexander V.van Stokkum, IvoWientjes, EmilieBüchel, Claudia
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