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Excavations on Roman pottery kiln sites in Cantley Parish, South Yorkshire, 1956–1975
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 19 / [ed] Steven Willis, Oxbow Books, 2022, Vol. 19, p. 44-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The South Yorkshire Roman pottery industry is concentrated largely in the parish of Cantley, immediately south-east ofDoncaster, the site of the fort and associated settlement of Danvm. Over seventy kilns, lying either side of the Lincolnto York via Castleford road, have been located, of which 55 have been excavated. This report deals with the remainingunpublished material, that from Cantley Kilns 30–32, 35–36 and 40–44. The earliest excavated kilns belong to themid-second century and production continued at least until the mid-fourth century. Material from Doncaster and othersites, however, suggests that earlier local late first and early second century production centres remain to be identified.Kiln types range from surface-built with removable furniture, to more substantial deeply excavated types with survivinginternal structures, including radial firebars over single and double pedestals, to more massive permanent floors overup to four pedestals. The products include mortaria, beakers, cooking pots/jars and bowls. White slip is employed onmortaria and red and white paint occurs on a few other vessels. Most of the material is in a hard gritty fabric producedin both light grey and red oxidised forms with varying degrees of burnishing. The mortaria have Mancetter/Hartshillaffinities which appear evident even after the demise of stamping by SARRIVS and others, and the cooking pots andbowls, reflect the general trend of Black-burnished ware production, although the latest forms do not occur. Threetypes, lid-seated jars, wide-mouthed/shouldered bowls and large bowls/pancheons of truncated conical form, belongto different, perhaps Continental traditions. Whilst most of the material appears to have been marketed locally, a fewvessels travelled further, particularly in the mid-second century, when Rossington Bridge, on the southern edge of theindustry, was involved in supply to the Antonine Wall.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxbow Books, 2022. Vol. 19, p. 44-146
Series
Journal of Roman Pottery Studies, ISSN 0958-3491 ; 19
Keywords [en]
South Yorkshire, Cantley, Roman period, pottery production, kilns
National Category
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-196674ISBN: 9781789258264 (electronic)ISBN: 9781789258257 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-196674DiVA, id: diva2:1670701
Available from: 2022-06-16 Created: 2022-06-16 Last updated: 2022-06-30Bibliographically approved

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Buckland, Philip I.

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Citation style
  • apa
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Language
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  • nn-NB
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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