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Gastroesophageal reflux and snoring are related to asthma and respiratory symptoms: Results from a Nordic longitudinal population survey
Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Centre for International Health, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
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2024 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 221, article id 107495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study if individuals with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) and habitual snoring are more likely to develop asthma and respiratory symptoms (i.e. wheeze, cough, chest tightness, breathlessness) than those without these conditions, and if these associations are additive.

Methods: We used data from the population-based prospective questionnaire study Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) (11,024 participants), with data from 1999 and 2011. Participants with heartburn or belching after going to bed, at least 1 night/week, were considered to have nGER. Participants reporting loud snoring at least 3 nights/week were considered to have habitual snoring. Participants were grouped into four groups by their nGER and snoring status: “never”; “former”; “incident”; “persistent”. Incident respiratory symptoms were analyzed among participants without respective symptom at baseline.

Results: Snoring and nGER were independently associated with incident asthma and respiratory symptoms. The risk of incident wheeze was increased in subjects with incident or persistent snoring (adjusted odds ratio (95 % CI): 1.44 (1.21–1.72)), nGER (2.18 (1.60–2.98)) and in those with both snoring and nGER (2.59 (1.83–3.65)). The risk of developing asthma was increased in subjects with incident or persistent snoring (1.44 (1.15–1.82)), nGER (1.99 (1.35–2.93)) and in those with both snoring and nGER (1.72 (1.06–2.77)). No significant interaction was found between snoring and nGER. A similar pattern was found for the incidence of all other respiratory symptoms studied, with the highest risk among those with both incident or persistent nGER and snoring.

Conclusion: The risk of developing asthma and respiratory symptoms is increased among subjects with nGER and habitual snoring. These associations are independent of each other and confounding factors. Snoring and nGER together are additive on respiratory symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024. Vol. 221, article id 107495
Keywords [en]
Asthma, Epidemiology, Habitual snoring, Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux, Respiratory symptom
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218872DOI: 10.1016/j.rmed.2023.107495PubMedID: 38101459Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85180325337OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-218872DiVA, id: diva2:1824326
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareBror Hjerpstedts stiftelseAvailable from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved

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Modig, LarsFranklin, Karl A.

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