Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The determinants of postpartum contraceptive use in Nigeria
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5471-9043
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Global Women's Health, E-ISSN 2673-5059, Vol. 4, article id 1284614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Postpartum contraception is vital for maternal and child health, and reduces the risk of infant mortality. The Health Belief Model (HBM) is a widely accepted framework for exploring health behaviors, such as contraceptive use. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the factors influencing postpartum contraceptive use in Nigeria and to contextualize the findings within the framework of the HBM.

Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from the Demographic Health Survey conducted in Nigeria (NDHS). In total, 28,041 women were included in this study. Self-reported contraceptive use was the outcome, while the explanatory variables included maternal age, place of residence, region of residence, religion, marital status, educational level, household wealth quintiles, knowledge of the ovulatory cycle, decision-maker for health care, and distance to health care facilities. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were used to summarize and identify factors influencing postpartum contraceptive use. The HBM was used to discuss the main findings.

Results: The prevalence of postpartum contraceptive use in Nigeria is 27%. Our findings showed that the odds of using contraceptives during the postpartum period were higher among women who knew their ovulation cycles, lived in urban areas in the southern region, had no distance barriers to health care, and were 25–49 years old. Education, wealth, and marital status also increase the odds of contraceptive use. However, women who lived in the northeast and northwest regions or shared decision-making with their partners had lower odds.

Conclusion: This study highlights the need for region-specific and age-focused interventions to increase contraceptive use in Nigeria. Additionally, increasing accessibility and affordability of contraceptives for younger and economically disadvantaged women, along with promoting women's autonomy in decision-making, can further enhance contraceptive use across Nigeria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023. Vol. 4, article id 1284614
Keywords [en]
birth spacing, family planning, fertility, HBM, postpartum, women’s health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-219084DOI: 10.3389/fgwh.2023.1284614ISI: 001129731400001PubMedID: 38148926Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85180684770OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-219084DiVA, id: diva2:1826128
Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(635 kB)29 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 635 kBChecksum SHA-512
774606afc2eb82f2aacfdf9be5a804b6a8435a698772adfb7104c2330108c56e9b9daf6fb0360a0d8556bc6b833e54af2f037850cc8fe5a00bd6e42472228e59
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Jonsson, HåkanNamatovu, Fredinah

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jonsson, HåkanNamatovu, Fredinah
By organisation
Department of Epidemiology and Global HealthCentre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR)
In the same journal
Frontiers in Global Women's Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 29 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 177 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf