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"25 dollar rebel": Identity politics, Legislation and Class in stories from Lesbian Activists in Nicaragua
Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).ORCID-id: 0000-0002-1032-8515
2010 (Engelska)Ingår i: Dissident Citizenship: Queer Postcolonial Belonging: Programme Information & Abstracts, 2010Konferensbidrag, Muntlig presentation med publicerat abstract (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

One interviewee says she has always been a marimacha, another view herself as a lesbian identified with gay men and a third talk about the importance of being a woman and not a cochóna. At manifestations they all have t-shirts with a person screaming “Soy Rebelde, Soy lesbiana, Soy mujer, Soy Ciudadana!!!” and “Exijo mis Derechos!”. The common political symbols and rhetoric are a huge part of the campaigns for sexual diversity, towards being able to exist as a sexual minority and a Nicaraguan citizen. To get finance for the work towards “sexual freedom”, identity politics is absolutely necessary. Fighting for acknowledge GLBT rights (in the ‘west’), are legitimate reasons for funding through international non-governmental organizations. Through this perspective identity politics, rather than queer theory, seem to be part of a colonial heritage. Hence categories such as lesbian, gay and trans- are presented as liberating space in the work for “a sexuality free from prejudice” and I find it interesting to ask how, why and when the identity-labels are being used.One important goal for the lesbian activists in Nicaragua is still visibility – to be recognized and accepted as lesbian women. In 1992 a law against same-sex, Article 204, was initiated and upheld by the Nicaraguan Supreme Court in 1994. The main target of article 204 was not women; but the initiative was part of an increased security for (heterosexual) women. Fortunately the article was abolished 2008, when a new Penal Code was drafted. Hence as in so many places and for such a long time the sexuality of women has been ignored in the legislation. On top of this, lesbian women generally have a hard time getting an independent life in Nicaragua. Women in the popular classes are often expected to take care of a common household and are economically dependent on male relatives. In the following paper I will discuss strategies to survive as a lesbian and lesbianism as part of survival as a queer citizen in Nicaragua.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
2010.
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Annan humaniora
Forskningsämne
etnologi; genusvetenskap
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128335OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-128335DiVA, id: diva2:1051423
Konferens
Dissident Citizenship: Queer Postcolonial Belonging, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, June 10-11, 2010
Tillgänglig från: 2016-12-01 Skapad: 2016-12-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2022-02-09Bibliografiskt granskad

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