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Is there a social gradient in how youth with mental disorder perform academically? Findings from a Swedish longitudinal register-based study
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2996-3348
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6008-2296
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6867-6205
2021 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: It is well established that academic achievement and other school-related outcomes are associated with mental health status in children and youths. However, few studies have examined the influence of socioeconomic background on the relationship between poor childhood/adolescent mental health and schoolperformance. From an equity perspective, it is important to explore how school-related outcomes are affected for young people with mental disorder and if these outcomes differ depending on gender and socioeconomic background. This study aimed to investigate social gradients in the prospective association between childhood/adolescent mental disorder and academic achievement.

Methods: This register based study used data from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab of linked Swedish registers on all children born between 1990 and 1994 and their parents (N = 642 558). The outcome was school grades achieved upon compulsory school graduation (age 15/16). Mental disorder was indicated by number of hospitalisations due to ICD classified mental disorders and prescription of psychoanaleptic drugs. Indicators of socioeconomic position were parental level of education and family income in four categories respectively. Parental history of mental disorder was controlled for. Linear regressions, including interaction analyses, were performed.

Results: Mental disorder in childhood/adolescence was related to lower grades, particularly in boys. The drop in academic achievement among youth with mental disorder was more pronounced among girls in mid SEP categories than among their less and more advantaged peers. A less clear interaction pattern was identified in boys.

Conclusions: Based on theory and existing research we expected a typical social gradient in the strength of the association between mental disorder and academic achievement. However, we identified a U-shaped social gradient among girls. Analyses of the links between mental health and academic outcomes need to take both gender andsocial position into account. More research is needed to investigate these patterns further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021. Vol. 21, no 1, article id 441
Keywords [en]
Mental Health, Academic Achievement, Social Gradient, Registry Data, Adolescents, Gender
National Category
Psychiatry Social Work Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-187502DOI: 10.1186/s12888-021-03448-zISI: 000693241400002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85114432379OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-187502DiVA, id: diva2:1593889
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014–1992Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0154
Note

Errata: Landstedt, E., Bortes, C. & Strandh, M. Correction to: Is there a social gradient in how youth with mental disorder perform academically? Findings from a Swedish longitudinal register-based study. BMC Psychiatry 21, 456 (2021). DOI: 10.1186/s12888-021-03465-y

Available from: 2021-09-14 Created: 2021-09-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved

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Landstedt, EvelinaBortes, CristianStrandh, Mattias

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