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A comparative study of immigrant-native segregation at multiple spatial scales in urban Europe
Institute of Urban Geography and Tourism Studies, University of Łódź, Łódzkie, Poland; Department of Geography, Centre for Migration and Urban Studies, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; Department of Geography, Environmental Management and Energy Studies, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
Department of Geography, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8913-7262
Department of Geography, Centre for Migration and Urban Studies, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
2023 (English)In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 43-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There has been a strong degree of interest over the last 30 years towards immigrant segregation in Europe. This paper aims to contribute towards the existing body of research by extending the multi-scalar analysis of patterns of immigrant residential segregation into a coherent international comparative study of cities of different sizes. We investigate the patterns of immigrant-native segregation at different geographical scales, along with their correlates, in more than a hundred cities in 2011 across Germany, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. Our findings suggest that cities in the UK are the most highly segregated in Europe. The positions of the other countries in the ‘European segregation ranking’ depend upon the considered immigrant group and spatial scale. The national context is consistently the most important factor in understanding segregation at multiple spatial scales. However, even while taking into account the national contexts, the structural-ecological factors remain important predictors of segregation patterns in Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023. Vol. 49, no 1, p. 43-65
Keywords [en]
cities, Europe, Immigrants, segregation, spatial scale
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190153DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2021.2008887ISI: 000724057200001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85120322023OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-190153DiVA, id: diva2:1617640
Available from: 2021-12-07 Created: 2021-12-07 Last updated: 2023-06-19Bibliographically approved

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Strömgren, Magnus

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