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Abiotic stress in plants, stress perception to molecular response and role of biotechnological tools in stress resistance
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7072-451x
School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
Department of Agriculture, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, Pakistan.
School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
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2021 (English)In: Agronomy, E-ISSN 2073-4395, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plants, due to their sessile nature, face several environmental adversities. Abiotic stresses such as heat, cold, drought, heavy metals, and salinity are serious threats to plant production and yield. To cope with these stresses, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to avoid or resist stress conditions. A proper response to abiotic stress depends primarily on how plants perceive the stress signal, which in turn leads to initiation of signaling cascades and induction of resistance genes. New biotechnological tools such as RNA-seq and CRISPR-cas9 are quite useful in identifying target genes on a global scale, manipulating these genes to achieve tolerance, and helping breeders to develop stress-tolerant cultivars. In this review, we will briefly discuss the adverse effects of key abiotic stresses such as cold, heat, drought, and salinity. We will also discuss how plants sense various stresses and the importance of biotechnological tools in the development of stress-tolerant cultivars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021. Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1579
Keywords [en]
Cold stress, CRISPR-cas9, Drought stress, Heat stress, Salinity, Stress sensors
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191262DOI: 10.3390/agronomy11081579ISI: 000688713500001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85113897981OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-191262DiVA, id: diva2:1627273
Available from: 2022-01-13 Created: 2022-01-13 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Imran, Qari Muhammad

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