Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Microbial Interactions - Underexplored Links Between Public Health Relevant Bacteria and Protozoa in Coastal Environments
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (EcoChange; UMFpub)
Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Umeå, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (EcoChange; UMFpub)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7819-9038
Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Umeå, Sweden.
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 13, article id 877483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The co-existence of bacteria and protozoa in aquatic environments has led to the evolution of predation defense mechanisms by the bacteria. Some of the predation-resistant bacteria (PRB) are also pathogenic to humans and other mammals. The links between PRB and protozoa in natural aquatic systems are poorly known, but they are important in predicting outbreaks and determining the long-term consequences of a contamination event. To elucidate co-occurrence patterns between PRB (16S rRNA) and bacterivorous protozoa (18S rRNA), we performed a field study in a coastal area in the northern Baltic Sea. Interactions between bacteria and protozoa were explored by using two complementary statistical tools. We found co-occurrence patterns between specific PRB and protozoa, such as Legionella and Ciliophora, and we also found that the interactions are genotype-specific as, for example, Rickettsia. The PRB sequence diversity was larger in bays and freshwater inlets compared to offshore sites, indicating local adaptions. Considering the PRB diversity in the freshwater in combination with the large spring floods in the area, freshwater influxes should be considered a potential source of PRB in the coastal northern Baltic Sea. These findings are relevant for the knowledge of survival and dispersal of potential pathogens in the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022. Vol. 13, article id 877483
Keywords [en]
aquatic microbiology, bacteria, biotic interactions, co-evolution, direct acyclic graph (DAG), joint species distribution model, predation resistance, protozoa
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-196973DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2022.877483ISI: 000816889300001PubMedID: 35770179Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85133551087OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-196973DiVA, id: diva2:1673612
Available from: 2022-06-21 Created: 2022-06-21 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Bacteria that escape predation: waterborne pathogens and their relatives
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacteria that escape predation: waterborne pathogens and their relatives
2023 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Bakterier som undkommer predation : vattenlevande patogener och deras släktingar
Abstract [en]

The hidden presence of opportunistic bacterial pathogens in the environment evokes concerns about emerging diseases, especially in the light of climate change. The co-evolution of bacteria and their predators (protozoa) has led to bacterial defence strategies of which some contribute to the ability of bacteria to cause disease. To increase our understanding of the interplay between bacteria, protozoa, land use, and climate scenarios in Nordic brackish and freshwater, four studies were designed. The first study explored the co-occurrence patterns between predation resistant bacteria (PRB) and bacterivorous protozoa in a coastal area in the northern Baltic Sea. The results showed higher PRB diversity in the bays and freshwater inlets, than in the offshore waters. Further, genotype specific interactions between protozoa and bacteria were identified. The second study focused on Legionella species diversity and their association with humic substances and low salinity, potentially facilitated through the promotion of the heterotrophic microbial food web or by iron availability. The third study examined the impact of intensified land use on bacterial taxa abundance and community composition in lake inflows, demonstrating indirect downstream effects on water quality. Factors such as pastures, fields, farms, aluminium, iron, and humic substances were linked to increased Legionella abundance. The fourth study exposed aquatic organisms to climate change scenarios, causing eutrophication or brownification with elevated iron levels. Pseudomonas aeruginosa were found to be especially persistent to iron, likely linked to the same mechanism that enables survival in protozoan cells. This trait was shared with other observed intracellular pathogens and uncultured species, who showed elevated resilience to brownification and ability to survive outside host cells. These findings identified complex relationships, which improve our understanding of the intricate dynamics that shape aquatic ecosystems, and highlight the importance of considering multiple factors in managing water resources and maintaining ecosystem health. Human activities including intensified land use can have far-reaching consequences, jeopardizing the pristine nature of water bodies and escalate the presence of environmental and opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2023. p. 62
Keywords
bacterial pathogens, protozoa, predation resistance, aquatic microbiology, climate change, opportunists, humification, iron
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
environmental science; Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216610 (URN)9789180702058 (ISBN)9789180702041 (ISBN)
Public defence
2023-12-08, SAM.A.280, Samhällsvetarhuset, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2023-11-17 Created: 2023-11-13 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2892 kB)97 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2892 kBChecksum SHA-512
a5dd580a448512b1791feebd9cbe7e3d34043229d52c78a4eb1e03f38992f5d12871b8cd71b34a4ee456422a220de59e575e54267e9bdccdde2f91c9577cc8bc
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Eriksson, Karolina I. A.Andersson, Agneta

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Eriksson, Karolina I. A.Andersson, Agneta
By organisation
Department of Ecology and Environmental SciencesUmeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF)
In the same journal
Frontiers in Microbiology
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 97 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 488 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf