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Migration experience, resilience and depression: a study of Iranian immigrants living in Australia
Global and Cultural Mental Health Unit, Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Global and Cultural Mental Health Unit, Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1230-6720
McCaughey VicHealth Centre for Community Wellbeing, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Culture and Mental Health, ISSN 1754-2863, E-ISSN 1754-2871, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 108-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The challenges of migration can jeopardize mental health, but also can provide opportunities for growth. This study investigated the association between levels of depression and socio-demographic and migration variables, and the role of resilience as a mediator between these features. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 182 Iranian immigrants living across Australia who completed an online questionnaire. Higher levels of depression were found in participants who were unemployed, experienced high levels of discrimination, had an incomplete tertiary education, and were younger and unmarried (p < 0.05). Higher levels of education, experience of moderate levels of discrimination and being married were associated with lower levels of depression mediated by resilience. Higher levels of depression were correlated with lower levels of resilience (r = −0.50, p < 0.001). The results of this study suggest several possible approaches to prevention of depression in immigrants. These may include improving employment opportunities, reducing discrimination, approaches that reduce the stress of the settlement process and interventions that aim to strengthen resilience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017. Vol. 10, no 1, p. 108-120
Keywords [en]
Depression, Iranian immigrants in Australia, resilience, socio-demographic and migration variables
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200198DOI: 10.1080/17542863.2016.1270977Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85008668675OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-200198DiVA, id: diva2:1703464
Available from: 2022-10-13 Created: 2022-10-13 Last updated: 2022-10-13Bibliographically approved

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Ghazinour, Mehdi

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf