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Taking out the garbage: cathepsin D and calcineurin in neurodegeneration
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, University of Graz, Austria.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1241-162X
2017 (English)In: Neural Regeneration Research, ISSN 1673-5374, E-ISSN 1876-7958, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 1776-1776Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellular homeostasis requires a tightly controlled balance between protein synthesis, folding and degradation. Especially long-lived, post-mitotic cells such as neurons depend on an efficient proteostasis system to maintain cellular health over decades. Thus, a functional decline of processes contributing to protein degradation such as autophagy and general lysosomal proteolytic capacity is connected to several age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases. These so called proteinopathies are characterized by the accumulation and misfolding of distinct proteins, subsequently driving cellular demise. We recently linked efficient lysosomal protein breakdown via the protease cathepsin D to the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In a yeast model for Parkinson’s disease, functional calcineurin was required for proper trafficking of cathepsin D to the lysosome and for recycling of its endosomal sorting receptor to allow further rounds of shuttling. Here, we discuss these findings in relation to present knowledge about the involvement of cathepsin D in proteinopathies in general and a possible connection between this protease, calcineurin signalling and endosomal sorting in particular. As dysregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis as well as lysosomal impairment is connected to a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders, this novel interplay might very well impact pathologies beyond Parkinson’s disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2017. Vol. 12, no 11, p. 1776-1776
Keywords [en]
A-synuclein, Calcineurin, Cathepsin D, Endosomal sorting, Lysosome, Neurodegeneration, Parkinson’s disease, Retromer, Yeast
National Category
Cell Biology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-215041DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.219031ISI: 000417880400005PubMedID: 29239314Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85040064063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-215041DiVA, id: diva2:1802944
Available from: 2023-10-06 Created: 2023-10-06 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved

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Kohler, AndreasKohler, Verena

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