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Sudan's health sector partnership: from confined progression to openness and hope to uncertain demise
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. World Health Organization Sudan Country Office, Sudan.ORCID iD: 0009-0003-7488-4777
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7087-1467
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.ORCID iD: 0000-00018723-8131
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7234-3510
2024 (English)In: Development Policy Review, ISSN 0950-6764, E-ISSN 1467-7679, Vol. 42, no 2, article id e12757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Motivation: Despite signature of the 2005 Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and subsequent adoption of the effective development cooperation (EDC) principles for better health cooperation, there is a gap in documenting the challenges to implement these commitments at country level. Sudan represents an interesting case study: the country adopted a local health compact in 2014, but for much of the time since the regime was under sanction. Sudan witnessed a revolution in 2018, followed by a counter-coup in 2021.

Purpose: We aim to explore the evolution of Sudan health sector partners’ relationships, perspectives, and adherence to EDC principles of ownership, alignment, and harmonization, while accounting for underlying processes and context changes between 2015 and 2022.

Methods and approach: We collected data through two rounds of interviews, in 2015 (16) and 2022 (8), with stakeholders within the Sudan Health Sector Partnership. We used the framework method for data analysis where responses are coded then sorted into themes.

Findings: Prior to the 2019 revolution cooperation was progressive but restricted, with civil society marginalized and a dominating government. The principles, especially ownership, were misused and misaligned with national priorities driven by donors’ interests and conditions.

The transitional (post-revolution) period witnessed partners’ openness and influx, but unstable leadership and subsequent changes in priorities led to wasted opportunities.

Following the coup, donors adopted a no-contact policy towards the de facto government. Instead, the expectation was that civil society organizations would replace the government as the main implementers. Overall, limited coordination capacity and no sustainability measures were present throughout.

Policy implications: Much of what was observed was down to the often complicated and difficult context of the governance of Sudan. That said, general issues arose including the government's ability to coordinate policy and implementation; the need for stable, legitimate arrangements; and the need to define the role of civil society and to empower civil society organizations. Within a complex and volatile context, revisiting partners’ commitments through joint compact reviews and transparent EDC progress monitoring is crucial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024. Vol. 42, no 2, article id e12757
Keywords [en]
alignment, coordination, effective development cooperation, framework analysis, harmonization, health sector, ownership, partnership, Sudan
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216479DOI: 10.1111/dpr.12757ISI: 001155272200001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85184249903OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-216479DiVA, id: diva2:1811444
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons StiftelseAvailable from: 2023-11-13 Created: 2023-11-13 Last updated: 2024-05-14Bibliographically approved

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Aweesha, HuzeifaHurtig, Anna-KarinPulkki-Brännström, Anni-MariaSan Sebastian, Miguel

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