Umeå universitets logga

umu.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
RefereraExporteraLänk till posten
Permanent länk

Direktlänk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Community perceptions of intimate partner violence: a qualitative study from urban Tanzania
Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Midwifery School, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania .
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).ORCID-id: 0000-0002-5095-3454
Bugando University College of Health Sciences, Archbishop Antony Mayalla School of Nursing, Mwanza Tanzania.
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS). Department of Clinical Sciences, Social Medicine and Global Health, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
2011 (Engelska)Ingår i: BMC Women's Health, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 11, artikel-id 13Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence against women is a prevailing public health problem in Tanzania, where four of ten women have a lifetime exposure to physical or sexual violence by their male partners. To be able to suggest relevant and feasible community and health care based interventions, we explored community members' understanding and their responses to intimate partner violence.

METHODS: A qualitative study using focus group discussions with 75 men and women was conducted in a community setting of urban Tanzania. We analysed data using a grounded theory approach and relate our findings to the ecological framework of intimate partner violence.

RESULTS: The analysis resulted in one core category, "Moving from frustration to questioning traditional gender norms", that denoted a community in transition where the effects of intimate partner violence had started to fuel a wish for change. At the societal level, the category "Justified as part of male prestige" illustrates how masculinity prevails to justify violence. At the community level, the category "Viewed as discreditable and unfair" indicates community recognition of intimate partner violence as a human rights concern. At the relationship level, the category "Results in emotional entrapment" shows the shame and self-blame that is often the result of a violent relationship. At the individual level, the risk factors for intimate partner violence were primarily associated with male characteristics; the category "Fed up with passivity" emerged as an indication that community members also acknowledge their own responsibility for change in actions.

CONCLUSIONS: Prevailing gender norms in Tanzania accept women's subordination and justify male violence towards women. At the individual level, an increasing openness makes it possible for women to report, ask for help, and become proactive in suggesting preventive measures. At the community level, there is an increased willingness to intervene but further consciousness-raising of the human rights perspective of violence, as well as actively engaging men. At the macro level, preventive efforts must be prioritized through re-enforcement of legal rights, and provision of adequate medical and social welfare services for both survivors and perpetrators.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
BioMed Central, 2011. Vol. 11, artikel-id 13
Nationell ämneskategori
Folkhälsovetenskap, global hälsa, socialmedicin och epidemiologi Reproduktionsmedicin och gynekologi Genusstudier
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49723DOI: 10.1186/1472-6874-11-13ISI: 000208607800013PubMedID: 21501506Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79955079953OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-49723DiVA, id: diva2:456833
Forskningsfinansiär
Forte, Forskningsrådet för hälsa, arbetsliv och välfärd, 2006-1512
Anmärkning

This study was performed with support from the Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation, Sida/SAREC. The authors acknowledge the very important administrative support from Umea University and Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, as well as community groups in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We also appreciate the support from the Centre for Global Health at Umea University, FAS and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research ( grant number. 2006-1512).

Tillgänglig från: 2011-11-16 Skapad: 2011-11-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2023-08-28Bibliografiskt granskad
Ingår i avhandling
1. Prevention of intimate partner violence: community and healthcare workers´ perceptions in urban Tanzania
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Prevention of intimate partner violence: community and healthcare workers´ perceptions in urban Tanzania
2011 (Engelska)Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is public health and human rights concern. The studies forming this thesis seek to understand healthcare worker and community attitudes and perceptions about IPV; their role in support, care and prevention of IPV, and the feasibility of introducing routine screening for IPV among women attending healthcare.

Methods: Four interrelated studies were conducted in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: 1) a content analysis of 16 in-depth interviews with healthcare workers about their experiences of meeting IPV clients, 2) a grounded theory analysis of seven focus group discussions that explore community perceptions, 3) a cross sectional study of 657 healthcare workers and students to understand their attitudes and perceptions about IPV and future roles in care and support, and 4) evaluation of a pilot intervention that introduces routine screening in an outpatient department. The pilot intervention included screening of 102 women, ten observations of healthcare worker interactions with women clients, three focus group discussions, and five narratives written by healthcare workers about their experiences with the screening tools.

Results: Gender inequalities, attitudes, and poverty intersect in the explanation of IPV. Healthcare workers view low economic status among women, rigid gender norms, and stigma that influences women to stay in violent relationships. Alcohol abuse, multiple sexual partners and low levels of income among men were cited as triggers for IPV episodes. Between 20-67% of healthcare workers and students report meeting IPV clients at work. More than 9o% observed clients with unexplained feelings of sadness and/or loss of confidence. Resource and training limitations, heavy workloads and low salaries constrain services. A strong desire to make a difference in the care and support of IPV clients was present, but violence as a hidden agenda with a client resistance to disclosure was a challenge. The community study shows a transition in gender norms is making violence against women less acceptable.

Conclusions and suggestions: Healthcare workers and the community strongly wish and are committed to support IPV prevention. Both groups understood the meaning, provocative factors and some IPV effects. This awareness contributes to their desire to be part of a change. At the central level, prevention of IPV should be on the governments’ policy agenda and should be prioritised. Education about gender-based violence must be incorporated into the curricula of healthcare workers. At community level, advocacy is necessary for changing harmful gender norms and measures to combat women’s poverty. Men should be engaged at all levels. Provision of information on the human rights perspectives of IPV should be strengthened and related to other types of violence.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Umeå: Umeå university, 2011. s. 54
Serie
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1460
Nyckelord
Intimate partner violence, healthcare workers, perceptions, gender norms, social support, prevention, Tanzania
Nationell ämneskategori
Medicin och hälsovetenskap
Forskningsämne
folkhälsa
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49743 (URN)978-91-7459-321-1 (ISBN)
Disputation
2011-12-02, Sal 135, Byggnad 9 A, Allmänmedicin, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (Engelska)
Opponent
Handledare
Tillgänglig från: 2011-11-18 Skapad: 2011-11-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-06-08Bibliografiskt granskad

Open Access i DiVA

Community perceptions of intimate partner violence: a qualitative study from urban Tanzania(413 kB)479 nedladdningar
Filinformation
Filnamn FULLTEXT02.pdfFilstorlek 413 kBChecksumma SHA-512
80b73355a1663f4e543035bd1b32b3a6973d0a093a810113b78133607e448521e3daf7c66d61ef1b79cb18117b6d84a7d599c9a8fac3f02a502dd6ce95bdcad1
Typ fulltextMimetyp application/pdf

Övriga länkar

Förlagets fulltextPubMedScopus

Person

Laisser, Rose MNyström, LennarthEmmelin, Maria

Sök vidare i DiVA

Av författaren/redaktören
Laisser, Rose MNyström, LennarthEmmelin, Maria
Av organisationen
Epidemiologi och global hälsaUmeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS)
I samma tidskrift
BMC Women's Health
Folkhälsovetenskap, global hälsa, socialmedicin och epidemiologiReproduktionsmedicin och gynekologiGenusstudier

Sök vidare utanför DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Totalt: 479 nedladdningar
Antalet nedladdningar är summan av nedladdningar för alla fulltexter. Det kan inkludera t.ex tidigare versioner som nu inte längre är tillgängliga.

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetricpoäng

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Totalt: 527 träffar
RefereraExporteraLänk till posten
Permanent länk

Direktlänk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf