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  • 1. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 2.
    AbdelMageed, Manar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44511, Egypt.
    Ali, Haytham
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44511, Egypt.
    Ohlsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    The Chemokine CXCL16 Is a New Biomarker for Lymph Node Analysis of Colon Cancer Outcome2019In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 22, article id 5793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    hemokines are important in the development and progression of tumors. We investigated the expression of CXCL14 and CXCL16 in colon cancer. Expression of mRNA was assessed in primary tumors and lymph nodes and CXCL16 mRNA levels were correlated to patient’s survival. Protein expression was investigated by two-color immunofluorescence and immunomorphometry. CXCL14 and CXCL16 mRNA levels and protein expression were significantly higher in colon cancer primary tumors compared to apparently normal colon tissue. Positive cells were tumor cells, as revealed by anti-CEA and anti-EpCAM staining. CXCL16, but not CXCL14, mRNA levels were significantly higher in hematoxylin and eosin positive (H&E(+)) compared to H&E(−) colon cancer lymph nodes or control nodes (P < 0.0001). CXCL16 mRNA was expressed in 5/5 colon cancer cell lines while CXCL14 was expressed significantly in only one. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that colon cancer patients with lymph nodes expressing high or very high levels (7.2 and 11.4 copies/18S rRNA unit, respectively) of CXCL16 mRNA had a decreased mean survival time of 30 and 46 months at the 12-year follow-up (P = 0.04, P = 0.005, respectively). In conclusion, high expression of CXCL16 mRNA in regional lymph nodes of colon cancer patients is a sign of a poor prognosis.

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  • 3.
    AbdelMageed, Manar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Ismail, Hager
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Ohlsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Clinical significance of stem cell biomarkers epcam, lgr5 and lgr4 mrna levels in lymph nodes of colon cancer patients2022In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The significance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in initiation and progression of colon cancer (CC) has been established. In this study, we investigated the utility of measuring mRNA expression levels of CSC markers EpCAM, LGR5 and LGR4 for predicting survival outcome in surgically treated CC patients. Expression levels were determined in 5 CC cell lines, 66 primary CC tumors and 382 regional lymph nodes of 121 CC patients. Prognostic relevance was determined using Kaplan‐Meier survival and Cox regression analyses. CC patients with lymph nodes expressing high levels of EpCAM, LGR5 or LGR4 (higher than a clinical cutoff of 0.07, 0.06 and 2.558 mRNA cop-ies/18S rRNA unit, respectively) had a decreased mean survival time of 32 months for EpCAM and 42 months for both LGR5 and LGR4 at a 12‐year follow‐up (p = 0.022, p = 0.005 and p = 0.011, respec-tively). Additional patients at risk for recurrence were detected when LGR5 was combined with the biomarkers CXCL17 or CEA plus CXCL16. In conclusion, the study underscores LGR5 as a particularly useful prognostic biomarker and illustrates the strength of combining biomarkers detecting different subpopulations of cancer cells and/or cells in the tumor microenvironment for predicting recurrence.

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  • 4.
    Abdullah Nasir, Ahmad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Herdenberg, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ligand-specific regulation of transforming growth factor beta superfamily factors by leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains proteins2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 8, article id e0289726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) are transmembrane proteins shown to promote bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammals. BMPs comprise a subfamily of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily, or TGFβ family, of ligands. In mammals, LRIG1 and LRIG3 promote BMP4 signaling. BMP6 signaling, but not BMP9 signaling, is also regulated by LRIG proteins, although the specific contributions of LRIG1, LRIG2, and LRIG3 have not been investigated, nor is it known whether other mammalian TGFβ family members are regulated by LRIG proteins. To address these questions, we took advantage of Lrig-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with doxycycline-inducible LRIG1, LRIG2, and LRIG3 alleles, which were stimulated with ligands representing all the major TGFβ family subgroups. By analyzing the signal mediators pSmad1/5 and pSmad3, as well as the induction of Id1 expression, we showed that LRIG1 promoted BMP2, BMP4, and BMP6 signaling and suppressed GDF7 signaling; LRIG2 promoted BMP2 and BMP4 signaling; and LRIG3 promoted BMP2, BMP4, BMP6, and GDF7 signaling. BMP9 and BMP10 signaling was not regulated by individual LRIG proteins, however, it was enhanced in Lrig-null cells. LRIG proteins did not regulate TGFβ1-induced pSmad1/5 signaling, or GDF11- or TGFβ1-induced pSmad3 signaling. Taken together, our results show that some, but not all, TGFβ family ligands are regulated by LRIG proteins and that the three LRIG proteins display differential regulatory effects. LRIG proteins thereby provide regulatory means for the cell to further diversify the signaling outcomes generated by a limited number of TGFβ family ligands and receptors.

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  • 5.
    Abdullah Nasir, Ahmad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Herdenberg, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Oncology Research Laboratory, NUS M31, Umeå, Sweden.
    Netrin-1 functions as a suppressor of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 8585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Netrin-1 is a secreted protein that is well known for its involvement in axonal guidance during embryonic development and as an enhancer of cancer cell metastasis. Despite extensive efforts, the molecular mechanisms behind many of the physiological functions of netrin-1 have remained elusive. Here, we show that netrin-1 functions as a suppressor of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in various cellular systems, including a mutually inhibitory interaction with the BMP-promoting function of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) proteins. The BMP inhibitory function of netrin-1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts was dependent on the netrin receptor neogenin, with the expression level regulated by both netrin-1 and LRIG proteins. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized function of netrin-1 that may help to explain several of the developmental, physiological, and cancer-promoting functions of netrins at the signal transduction level.

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  • 6.
    Abildgaard, Niels
    et al.
    Hematology Research Unit, Department of Hematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Anttila, Pekka
    Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Hematology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Waage, Anders
    Department of Hematology, St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Rubin, Katrine Hass
    Research Unit OPEN, Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ørstavik, Sigurd
    Takeda Pharmaceuticals International AG, Oslo, Norway.
    Bent-Ennakhil, Nawal
    Takeda Pharmaceuticals International AG, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Gavini, François
    Takeda Pharmaceuticals International AG, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Ma, Yuanjun
    Parexel International, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Freilich, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Parexel International, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansson, Markus
    Sahlgrenska Academy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Real-world treatment patterns and outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma in Denmark, Finland and Sweden: An analysis using linked Nordic registries2024In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 201, article id 113921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The Health outcomes and Understanding of MyelomA multi-National Study (HUMANS) was a large-scale, retrospective study conducted across Denmark, Finland and Sweden using linked data from national registries. We describe the characteristics, treatment patterns and clinical outcomes for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) over 2010–2018.

    Methods: Patients with NDMM who received MM-specific, first-line treatments, were categorised by treatment (autologous stem cell transplantation [ASCT] or a combination chemotherapy regimen based on bortezomib, lenalidomide or melphalan-prednisolone-thalidomide).

    Results: 11,023 patients received treatment over 2010–2018. Time between diagnosis and treatment was shortest in Denmark (0.9 months), then Sweden (2.9 months) and Finland (4.6 months). Around one third of patients underwent ASCT. Lenalidomide-based regimens were prescribed to 23–28% of patients in Denmark and Finland, versus 12% in Sweden. Patients receiving lenalidomide had the longest wait for treatment, from 3.2 months (Denmark) to 12.1 months (Sweden). Treatment persistence was highest among patients receiving melphalan-prednisolone-thalidomide (7–8 months) in Finland and Sweden and lowest among those receiving bortezomib (3.5 months) in Finland. Overall survival (OS) was longest among patients with ASCT (7–10 years). Among patients receiving chemotherapy, OS (from diagnosis/treatment initiation), varied between cohorts. In a sensitivity analysis excluding patients with smouldering MM, OS decreased for all; for patients receiving bortezomib or lenalidomide, OS from diagnosis was 40–49 and 27–54 months, respectively.

    Conclusions: This population-based study of patients with NDMM receiving first-line MM-specific treatment, provides real-world data on treatment patterns and outcomes to complement data from randomised clinical trials.

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  • 7.
    Abildgaard, Niels
    et al.
    Hematology Research Unit, Department of Hematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Freilich, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Department of Access Consulting, PAREXEL International, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anttila, Pekka
    Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Hematology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bent-Ennakhil, Nawal
    Takeda Pharmaceuticals International AG, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Ma, Yuanjun
    Department of Access Consulting, PAREXEL International, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lassenius, Mariann
    Medaffcon, Espoo, Finland.
    Ørstavik, Sigurd
    Takeda Pharmaceuticals International AG, Oslo, Norway.
    Toppila, Iiro
    Medaffcon, Espoo, Finland.
    Waage, Anders
    Department of Hematology, St Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Turesson, Ingemar
    Lund University Cancer Centre, University of Lund, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Markus
    Sahlgrenska Academy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Use of linked nordic registries for population studies in hematologic cancers: the case of multiple myeloma2023In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 15, p. 987-999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Linked health-care registries and high coverage in Nordic countries lend themselves well to epidemiologic research. Given its relatively high incidence in Western Europe, complexity in diagnosis, and challenges in registration, multiple myeloma (MM) was selected to compare registries in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden.

    Patients and Methods: Data were obtained from four archetypal registries in each country (spanning January 2005–October 2018): National Patient Registry (NPR), Prescribed Drug Registry (PDR), Cancer Registry (CR), and Cause of Death Registry. Patients newly diagnosed with MM who received MM-specific treatment were included. PDR/NPR treatment records were used to assess incident NPR cases. The registration quality of MM-specific drugs in the PDR of each country was also evaluated.

    Results: In Denmark, only 6% of patients in the NPR were not registered in the CR; in Sweden, it was 16.9%. No systematic differences were identified that could explain this discrepancy. In Denmark, lenalidomide and bortezomib were registered in the NPR with high coverage, but less expensive drugs typically given in combination with bortezomib were not covered in any of the registries. In Finland and Sweden, bortezomib records were not identified in the PDR, but some were in the NPR; other drugs had good coverage in the PDR.

    Conclusions: The registries evaluated in this study can be used to identify the MM population; however, given the gaps in MM registration in the Finnish and Swedish CRs, Danish registries provide the most comprehensive datasets for research on treatment patterns for MM.

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  • 8.
    Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin
    et al.
    UCL Division of Surgical and Interventional Science, Specialist Centre for Kidney Cancer, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Powles, Thomas
    Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Capitanio, Umberto
    Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute (URI), IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Beisland, Christian
    Department of Urology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Järvinen, Petrus
    Urology, Abdominal Centre, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Stewart, Grant D.
    Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Gudmundsson, Eirikur
    Department of Urology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Lam, Thomas B.L.
    Academic Urology Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Marconi, Lorenzo
    Department of Urology, Coimbra University Hospital, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Fernandéz-Pello, Sergio
    Department of Urology, Cabueñes University Hospital, Gijón, Spain.
    Nisen, Harry
    Urology, Abdominal Centre, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Meijer, Richard P.
    Department of Oncological Urology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Volpe, Alessandro
    Department of Urology, Maggiore della Carità Hospital, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Klatte, Tobias
    Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Urology, Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, United Kingdom.
    Bensalah, Karim
    Department of Urology, University Hospital of Rennes, Rennes, France.
    Dabestani, Saeed
    Division of Urological Cancers, Department of Translational Medicine, Central Hospital Kristianstad, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bex, Axel
    UCL Division of Surgical and Interventional Science, Specialist Centre for Kidney Cancer, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; Department of Urology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Should patients with low-risk renal cell carcinoma be followed differently after nephron-sparing surgery vs radical nephrectomy?2021In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 128, no 3, p. 386-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether pT1 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) should be followed differently after partial (PN) or radical nephrectomy (RN) based on a retrospective analysis of a multicentre database (RECUR).

    Subjects: A retrospective study was conducted in 3380 patients treated for nonmetastatic RCC between January 2006 and December 2011 across 15 centres from 10 countries, as part of the RECUR database project. For patients with pT1 clear-cell RCC, patterns of recurrence were compared between RN and PN according to recurrence site. Univariate and multivariate models were used to evaluate the association between surgical approach and recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific mortality (CSM).

    Results: From the database 1995 patients were identified as low-risk patients (pT1, pN0, pNx), of whom 1055 (52.9%) underwent PN. On multivariate analysis, features associated with worse RFS included tumour size (hazard ratio [HR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–1.39; P < 0.001), nuclear grade (HR 2.31, 95% CI 1.73–3.08; P < 0.001), tumour necrosis (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.03–2.3; P = 0.037), vascular invasion (HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3–4.4; P = 0.005) and positive surgical margins (HR 4.4, 95% CI 2.3–8.5; P < 0.001). Kaplan–Meier analysis of CSM revealed that the survival of patients with recurrence after PN was significantly better than those with recurrence after RN (P = 0.02). While the above-mentioned risk factors were associated with prognosis, type of surgery alone was not an independent prognostic variable for RFS nor CSM. Limitations include the retrospective nature of the study.

    Conclusion: Our results showed that follow-up protocols should not rely solely on stage and type of primary surgery. An optimized regimen should also include validated risk factors rather than type of surgery alone to select the best imaging method and to avoid unnecessary imaging. A follow-up of more than 3 years should be considered in patients with pT1 tumours after RN. A novel follow-up strategy is proposed.

  • 9.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Department of Urology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Standardized care pathways for patients with suspected urinary bladder cancer: the Swedish experience2022In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare time intervals to diagnosis and treatment, tumor characteristics, and management in patients with primary urinary bladder cancer, diagnosed before and after the implementation of a standardized care pathway (SCP) in Sweden.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer was studied before (2011-2015) and after (2016-2019) SCP. Data about time from referral to transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT), patients and tumor characteristics, and management were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed for cT1 and cT2-4 tumors.

    RESULTS: Out of 26,795 patients, median time to TURBT decreased from 37 to 27 days after the implementation of SCP. While the proportion of cT2-T4 tumors decreased slightly (22-21%, p < 0.001), this change was not stable over time and the proportions cN + and cM1 remained unchanged. In the subgroups with cT1 and cT2-4 tumors, the median time to TURBT decreased and the proportions of patients discussed at a multidisciplinary team conference (MDTC) increased after SCP. In neither of these subgroups was a change in the proportions of cN + and cM1 observed, while treatment according to guidelines increased after SCP in the cT1 group.

    CONCLUSION: After the implementation of SCP, time from referral to TURBT decreased and the proportion of patients discussed at MDTC increased, although not at the levels recommended by guidelines. Thus, our findings point to the need for measures to increase adherence to SCP recommendations and to guidelines.

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  • 10.
    Achour, Cyrinne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Aguilo, Francesca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Long Noncoding RNAs as Players in Breast Tumorigenesis2020In: The chemical biology of long noncoding RNAs / [ed] Stefan Jurga, Jan Barciszewski, Springer, 2020, , p. 19p. 385-403Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehensive analysis of the mammalian genome uncovered the discovery of pervasive transcription of large RNA transcripts that do not code for proteins, namely, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs play important roles in the regulation of gene expression from integration of chromatin remodeling complexes to transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of protein-coding genes. Application of next-generation sequencing technologies to cancer transcriptomes has revealed that aberrant expression of lncRNAs is associated with tumor progression and metastasis. Although thousands of lncRNAs have been shown to be dysregulated in different cancer types, just few of them have been fully characterized. In this book chapter, we aim to highlight recent findings of the mechanistic function of lncRNAs in breast cancer and summarize key examples of lncRNAs that are misregulated during breast tumorigenesis. We have categorized breast cancer–associated lncRNA according to their contribution to tumor suppression or tumor progression based on recent studies. Because some of them are expressed in a specific molecular breast cancer subtype, we have outlined lncRNAs that can potentially serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers, in which expression is linked to chemotherapy resistance. Finally, we have discussed current limitations and perspectives on potential lncRNA targets for use in therapies against breast cancer.

  • 11.
    Achour, Cyrinne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Bhattarai, Devi Prasad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Groza, Paula
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Roman, Ángel-Carlos
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.
    Aguilo, Francesca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    METTL3 regulates breast cancer-associated alternative splicing switches2023In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 42, p. 911-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative splicing (AS) enables differential inclusion of exons from a given transcript, thereby contributing to the transcriptome and proteome diversity. Aberrant AS patterns play major roles in the development of different pathologies, including breast cancer. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), the most abundant internal modification of eukaryotic mRNA, influences tumor progression and metastasis of breast cancer, and it has been recently linked to AS regulation. Here, we identify a specific AS signature associated with breast tumorigenesis in vitro. We characterize for the first time the role of METTL3 in modulating breast cancer-associated AS programs, expanding the role of the m6A-methyltransferase in tumorigenesis. Specifically, we find that both m6A deposition in splice site boundaries and in splicing and transcription factor transcripts, such as MYC, direct AS switches of specific breast cancer-associated transcripts. Finally, we show that five of the AS events validated in vitro are associated with a poor overall survival rate for patients with breast cancer, suggesting the use of these AS events as a novel potential prognostic biomarker.

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  • 12.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Dahl Scherdin, Tove
    Egevad, Lars
    Granfors, Torvald
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBPβ expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of a tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBPβ). To explore this further, we examined C/EBPβ expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors―and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    In rats, C/EBPβ mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBPβ was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBPβ expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, with distance to the tumor, and with tumor cell metastatic capacity.

    In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBPβ in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and a favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBPβ in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, the presence of metastases at diagnosis, and poor outcome. 

  • 13.
    Adamo, Hanibal Hani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergström, Sofia Halin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Characterization of a Gene Expression Signature in Normal Rat Prostate Tissue Induced by the Presence of a Tumor Elsewhere in the Organ2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0130076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating changes in the tumor-bearing organ, for example growth of the vasculature, an altered extracellular matrix, and influx of inflammatory cells. To investigate this response further, we compared prostate morphology and the gene expression profile of tumor-bearing normal rat prostate tissue (termed tumor-instructed/indicating normal tissue (TINT)) with that of prostate tissue from controls. Dunning rat AT-1 prostate cancer cells were injected into rat prostate and tumors were established after 10 days. As controls we used intact animals, animals injected with heat-killed AT-1 cells or cell culture medium. None of the controls showed morphological TINT-changes. A rat Illumina whole-genome expression array was used to analyze gene expression in AT-1 tumors, TINT, and in medium injected prostate tissue. We identified 423 upregulated genes and 38 downregulated genes (p<0.05, >= 2-fold change) in TINT relative to controls. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis verified key TINT-changes, and they were not detected in controls. Expression of some genes was changed in a manner similar to that in the tumor, whereas other changes were exclusive to TINT. Ontological analysis using GeneGo software showed that the TINT gene expression profile was coupled to processes such as inflammation, immune response, and wounding. Many of the genes whose expression is altered in TINT have well-established roles in tumor biology, and the present findings indicate that they may also function by adapting the surrounding tumor-bearing organ to the needs of the tumor. Even though a minor tumor cell contamination in TINT samples cannot be ruled out, our data suggest that there are tumor-induced changes in gene expression in the normal tumor-bearing organ which can probably not be explained by tumor cell contamination. It is important to validate these changes further, as they could hypothetically serve as novel diagnostic and prognostic markers of prostate cancer.

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  • 14.
    Adamo, Hanibal Hani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Scherdin, Tove Dahl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Egevad, Lars
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBPβ expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome2019In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 435-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein- (C/EBP).

    Methods: To explore this further, we examined C/EBP expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors?and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    Results: In rats, C/EBP mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBP was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBP expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, distance to the tumor, and metastatic capacity. In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBP in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBP in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, metastases, and poor outcome.

    Conclusions: This study suggest that the expression of C/EBP-beta, a transcription factor mediating multiple biological effects, is differentially expressed both in the benign parts of the tumor-bearing prostate and in prostate tumors, and that alterations in this may be related to patient outcome.

  • 15.
    Adamo, Hanibal Hani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Strömvall, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Adaptive (TINT) Changes in the Tumor Bearing Organ Are Related to Prostate Tumor Size and Aggressiveness2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0141601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to grow, tumors need to induce supportive alterations in the tumor-bearing organ, by us named tumor instructed normal tissue (TINT) changes. We now examined if the nature and magnitude of these responses were related to tumor size and aggressiveness. Three different Dunning rat prostate tumor cells were implanted into the prostate of immune-competent rats; 1) fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu tumor cells 2) fast growing and poorly metastatic AT-1 tumor cells, and 3) slow growing and non-metastatic G tumor cells. All tumor types induced increases in macrophage, mast cell and vascular densities and in vascular cell-proliferation in the tumor-bearing prostate lobe compared to controls. These increases occurred in parallel with tumor growth. The most pronounced and rapid responses were seen in the prostate tissue surrounding MatLyLu tumors. They were, also when small, particularly effective in attracting macrophages and stimulating growth of not only micro-vessels but also small arteries and veins compared to the less aggressive AT-1 and G tumors. The nature and magnitude of tumor-induced changes in the tumor-bearing organ are related to tumor size but also to tumor aggressiveness. These findings, supported by previous observation in patient samples, suggest that one additional way to evaluate prostate tumor aggressiveness could be to monitor its effect on adjacent tissues.

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  • 16.
    Adrian, Gabriel
    et al.
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Division of Oncology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Henrik
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Division of Oncology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kjellén, Elisabeth
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjövall, Johanna
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology –Head and Neck Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gebre-Medhin, Maria
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Primary tumor volume and prognosis for patients with p16-positive and p16-negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation therapy2022In: Radiation Oncology, ISSN 1748-717X, E-ISSN 1748-717X, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prescribed radiation dose to patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is standardized, even if the prognosis for individual patients may differ. Easy-at-hand pre-treatment risk stratification methods are valuable to individualize therapy. In the current study we assessed the prognostic impact of primary tumor volume for p16-positive and p16-negative tumors and in relationship to other prognostic factors for outcome in patients with OPSCC treated with primary radiation therapy (RT). Methods: Five hundred twenty-three OPSCC patients with p16-status treated with primary RT (68.0 Gy to 73.1 Gy in 7 weeks, or 68.0 Gy in 4.5 weeks), with or without concurrent chemotherapy, within three prospective trials were included in the study. Local failure (LF), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in relationship to the size of the primary gross tumor volume (GTV-T) and other prognostic factors were investigated. Efficiency of intensified RT (RT with total dose 73.1 Gy or given within 4.5 weeks) was analyzed in relationship to tumor volume. Results: The volume of GTV-T and p16-status were found to be the strongest prognostic markers for LF, PFS and OS. For p16-positive tumors, an increase in tumor volume had a significantly higher negative prognostic impact compared with p16-negative tumors. Within a T-classification, patients with a smaller tumor, compared with a larger tumor, had a better prognosis. The importance of tumor volume remained after adjusting for nodal status, age, performance status, smoking status, sex, and hemoglobin-level. The adjusted hazard ratio for OS per cm3 increase in tumor volume was 2.3% (95% CI 0–4.9) for p16-positive and 1.3% (95% 0.3–2.2) for p16-negative. Exploratory analyses suggested that intensified RT could mitigate the negative impact of a large tumor volume. Conclusions: Outcome for patients with OPSCC treated with RT is largely determined by tumor volume, even when adjusting for other established prognostic factors. Tumor volume is significantly more influential for patients with p16-positive tumors. Patients with large tumor volumes might benefit by intensified RT to improve survival.

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  • 17. Adrian, Gabriel
    et al.
    Gebre-Medhin, Maria
    Kjellen, Elisabeth
    Wieslander, Elinore
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Altered fractionation diminishes importance of tumor volume in oropharyngeal cancer: Subgroup analysis of ARTSCAN-trial2020In: Head and Neck, ISSN 1043-3074, E-ISSN 1097-0347, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2099-2105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A large tumor volume negatively impacts the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Altered fractionation (AF) can improve local control (LC) compared with conventional fractionation (CF). The aim of the present study was to investigate if response to AF differs with tumor volume in oropharyngeal cancer.

    Methods: Three hundred and twenty four patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated in a randomized, phase III trial comparing CF (2 Gy/d, 5 d/wk, 7 weeks, total dose 68 Gy) to AF (1.1 Gy + 2 Gy/d, 5 d/wk, 4.5 weeks, total dose 68 Gy) were analyzed.

    Results: Tumor volume had less impact on LC for patients treated with AF. There was an interaction between tumor volume and fractionation schedule (P = .039). This differential response was in favor of CF for small tumors and of AF for large tumors.

    Conclusion: AF diminishes the importance of tumor volume for local tumor control in oropharyngeal cancer.

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  • 18.
    Aglago, Elom K.
    et al.
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Riboli, Elio
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, TX, Houston, United States; Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, GA, Atlanta, United States.
    Hughes, David J.
    Cancer Biology and Therapeutics Group (CBT), Conway Institute, School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science (SBBS), University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Fournier, Agnes
    Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; Blanquerna School of Health Sciences, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Overvad, Kim
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, Section of Environmental Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Severi, Gianluca
    Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Department of Statistics, Computer Science, Applications “G. Parenti”, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Katzke, Verena
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Srour, Bernard
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Wittenbecher, Clemens
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, MA, Boston, United States; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany.
    Palli, Domenico
    Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network, ISPRO, Florence, Italy.
    Sieri, Sabina
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Via Venezian, Milano, Italy.
    Pasanisi, Fabrizio
    Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Hyblean Association for Epidemiological Research, AIRE-ONLUS, Ragusa, Italy.
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; Unit of Epidemiology, Regional Health Service, TO, Grugliasco, Italy.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Former senior scientist, Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Derksen, Jeroen W. G.
    Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Skeie, Guri
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Jensen, Torill Enget
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lukic, Marko
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, Sub-Directorate for Public Health and Addictions of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastián, Spain; Biodonostia Health Research Institute, Epidemiology and Public Health Area, San Sebastián, Spain.
    Colorado-Yohar, Sandra
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; Research Group on Demography and Health, National Faculty of Public Health, University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Papier, Keren
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Knuppel, Anika
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Casagrande, Corinne
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Heath, Alicia K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Dietary intake of total, heme and non-heme iron and the risk of colorectal cancer in a European prospective cohort study2023In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 128, p. 1529-1540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Iron is an essential micronutrient with differing intake patterns and metabolism between men and women. Epidemiologic evidence on the association of dietary iron and its heme and non-heme components with colorectal cancer (CRC) development is inconclusive.

    Methods: We examined baseline dietary questionnaire-assessed intakes of total, heme, and non-heme iron and CRC risk in the EPIC cohort. Sex-specific multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using Cox regression. We modelled substitution of a 1 mg/day of heme iron intake with non-heme iron using the leave one-out method.

    Results: Of 450,105 participants (318,680 women) followed for 14.2 ± 4.0 years, 6162 (3511 women) developed CRC. In men, total iron intake was not associated with CRC risk (highest vs. lowest quintile, HRQ5vs.Q1:0.88; 95%CI:0.73, 1.06). An inverse association was observed for non-heme iron (HRQ5vs.Q1:0.80, 95%CI:0.67, 0.96) whereas heme iron showed a non-significant association (HRQ5vs.Q1:1.10; 95%CI:0.96, 1.27). In women, CRC risk was not associated with intakes of total (HRQ5vs.Q1:1.11, 95%CI:0.94, 1.31), heme (HRQ5vs.Q1:0.95; 95%CI:0.84, 1.07) or non-heme iron (HRQ5vs.Q1:1.03, 95%CI:0.88, 1.20). Substitution of heme with non-heme iron demonstrated lower CRC risk in men (HR:0.94; 95%CI: 0.89, 0.99).

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest potential sex-specific CRC risk associations for higher iron consumption that may differ by dietary sources.

  • 19. Aglago, Elom K.
    et al.
    Mayén, Ana-Lucia
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Freisling, Heinz
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Hughes, David J.
    Jiao, Li
    Eriksen, Anne Kirstine
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Severi, Gianluca
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Katzke, Verena
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Birukov, Anna
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Santucci de Magistris, Maria
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Derksen, Jeroen W. G.
    Skeie, Guri
    Gram, Inger Torhild
    Sandanger, Torkjel
    Quirós, J. Ramón
    Luján-Barroso, Leila
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Amiano, Pilar
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Heath, Alicia K.
    Schalkwijk, Casper G.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Dietary Advanced Glycation End-Products and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study2021In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 3132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary advanced glycation end-products (dAGEs) have been hypothesized to be associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by promoting inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the colonic epithelium. However, evidence from prospective cohort studies is scarce and inconclusive. We evaluated CRC risk associated with the intake of dAGEs in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Dietary intakes of three major dAGEs: Nε-carboxy-methyllysine (CML), Nε-carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) were estimated in 450,111 participants (median follow-up = 13 years, with 6162 CRC cases) by matching to a detailed published European food composition database. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations of dAGEs with CRC were computed using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models. Inverse CRC risk associations were observed for CML (HR comparing extreme quintiles: HRQ5vs.Q1 = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.85-1.00) and MG-H1 (HRQ5vs.Q1 = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.85-1.00), but not for CEL (HRQ5vs.Q1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.89-1.05). The associations did not differ by sex or anatomical location of the tumor. Contrary to the initial hypothesis, our findings suggest an inverse association between dAGEs and CRC risk. More research is required to verify these findings and better differentiate the role of dAGEs from that of endogenously produced AGEs and their precursor compounds in CRC development.

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  • 20.
    Aglago, Elom K.
    et al.
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Murphy, Neil
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Nicolas, Geneviève
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Casagrande, Corinne
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, GA, Atlanta, United States.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Office of the Director, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    CESP, Faculté de médecine—Université Paris-Saclay, UVSQ, INSERM, Villejuif, France; Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Olsen, Anja
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Foundation under Public Law, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Katzke, Verena
    German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Foundation under Public Law, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany; Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Nuthetal, Germany.
    Masala, Giovanna
    Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network –ISPRO, Florence, Italy.
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Panico, Salvatore
    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, Provincial Health Authority (ASP 7), Ragusa, Italy.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital, Turin, Italy.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas H.
    Former senior scientist, Dept. for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Derksen, Jeroen W. G.
    Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Skeie, Guri
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Gram, Inger Torhild
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Brustad, Magritt
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; Blanquerna School of Health Sciences, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain.
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, Donostia-San Sebastian, Spain.
    Huerta, José María
    Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Heath, Alicia K.
    School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Chajes, Veronique
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Nutrition and Metabolism Branch, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
    Dietary intake and plasma phospholipid concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and trans fatty acids and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort2021In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 149, no 4, p. 865-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiologic studies examining the association between specific fatty acids and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk are inconclusive. We investigated the association between dietary estimates and plasma levels of individual and total saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA), industrial-processed trans (iTFA), and ruminant-sourced trans (rTFA) fatty acids, and CRC risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Baseline fatty acid intakes were estimated in 450 112 participants (6162 developed CRC, median follow-up = 15 years). In a nested case-control study, plasma phospholipid fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography in 433 colon cancer cases and 433 matched controls. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using Cox and conditional logistic regression, respectively. Dietary total SFA (highest vs lowest quintile, HRQ5vsQ1 = 0.80; 95%CI:0.69-0.92), myristic acid (HRQ5vsQ1 = 0.83, 95%CI:0.74-0.93) and palmitic acid (HRQ5vsQ1 = 0.81, 95%CI:0.70-0.93) were inversely associated with CRC risk. Plasma myristic acid was also inversely associated with colon cancer risk (highest vs lowest quartile, ORQ4vsQ1 = 0.51; 95%CI:0.32-0.83), whereas a borderline positive association was found for plasma stearic acid (ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.63; 95%CI:1.00-2.64). Dietary total MUFA was inversely associated with colon cancer (per 1-SD increment, HR1-SD = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.85-0.98), but not rectal cancer (HR1-SD = 1.04, 95%CI:0.95-1.15, Pheterogeneity = 0.027). Dietary iTFA, and particularly elaidic acid, was positively associated with rectal cancer (HR1-SD = 1.07, 95%CI:1.02-1.13). Our results suggest that total and individual saturated fatty acids and fatty acids of industrial origin may be relevant to the aetiology of CRC. Both dietary and plasma myristic acid levels were inversely associated with colon cancer risk, which warrants further investigation.

  • 21. Aglago, Elom K.
    et al.
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Freisling, Heinz
    Jiao, Li
    Hughes, David J.
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Schalkwijk, Casper G.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Eriksen, Anne Kirstine
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Severi, Gianluca
    Katzke, Verena
    Kühn, Tilman
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    van Gils, Carla H.
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Gram, Inger T.
    Skeie, Guri
    Quirós, J. Ramón
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Sánchez, Maria-Jose
    Amiano, Pilar
    Huerta, José María
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Mayén, Ana-Lucia
    Cordova, Reynalda
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Jenab, Mazda
    Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (sRAGE) and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Case-Control Study Nested within a European Prospective Cohort2021In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 182-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overexpression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) has been associated with chronic inflammation, which in turn has been associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) competes with RAGE to bind its ligands, thus potentially preventing RAGE-induced inflammation.

    METHODS: To investigate whether sRAGE and related genetic variants are associated with colorectal cancer risk, we conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Plasma sRAGE concentrations were measured by ELISA in 1,361 colorectal cancer matched case-control sets. Twenty-four SNPs encoded in the genes associated with sRAGE concentrations were available for 1,985 colorectal cancer cases and 2,220 controls. Multivariable adjusted ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using conditional and unconditional logistic regression for colorectal cancer risk and circulating sRAGE and SNPs, respectively.

    RESULTS: Higher sRAGE concentrations were inversely associated with colorectal cancer (ORQ5vs.Q1, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-1.00). Sex-specific analyses revealed that the observed inverse risk association was restricted to men (ORQ5vs.Q1, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.42-0.94), whereas no association was observed in women (ORQ5vs.Q1, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.68-1.48; Pheterogeneity for sex = 0.006). Participants carrying minor allele of rs653765 (promoter region of ADAM10) had lower colorectal cancer risk (C vs. T, OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.99).

    CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic sRAGE concentrations were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men, but not in women. An SNP located within ADAM10 gene, pertaining to RAGE shedding, was associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    IMPACT: Further studies are needed to confirm our observed sex difference in the association and better explore the potential involvement of genetic variants of sRAGE in colorectal cancer development.

  • 22. Agudo, Antonio
    et al.
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sala, Núria
    Muñoz, Xavier
    Aranda, Núria
    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Grioni, Sara
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Molina, Esther
    Navarro, Carmen
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Chamosa, Saioa
    Allen, Naomi E
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Siersema, Peter D
    Numans, Mattijs E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Kaaks, Rudof
    Canzian, Federico
    Boeing, Heiner
    Meidtner, Karina
    Johansson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine. WHO, IARC, Lyon, France.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Lund, Eiliv
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Jenab, Mazda
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Offerhaus, G Johan A
    Riboli, Elio
    González, Carlos A
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Hemochromatosis (HFE) gene mutations and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2013In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1244-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a strong risk factor for hepatocellular cancer, and mutations in the HFE gene associated with HH and iron overload may be related to other tumors, but no studies have been reported for gastric cancer (GC). A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), including 365 incident gastric adenocarcinoma and 1284 controls matched by center, sex, age and date of blood collection. Genotype analysis was performed for two functional polymorphisms (C282Y/rs1800562 and H63D/rs1799945) and seven tagSNPs of the HFE genomic region. Association with all gastric adenocarcinoma, and according to anatomical localization and histological subtype, was assessed by means of the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for the matching variables. We observed a significant association for H63D with OR (per rare allele) of 1.32 (CI = 1.03-1.69). In subgroup analyses, the association was stronger for non-cardia anatomical subsite (OR = 1.60, CI = 1.16-2.21) and intestinal histological subtype (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.27-2.62). Among intestinal cases, two tagSNPs (rs1572982 and rs6918586) also showed a significant association that disappeared after adjustment for H63D. No association with tumors located in the cardia or with diffuse subtype was found for any of the nine SNPs analyzed. Our results suggest that H63D variant in HFE gene seems to be associated with GC risk of the non-cardia region and intestinal type, possibly due to its association with iron overload although a role for other mechanisms cannot be entirely ruled out.

  • 23. Agudo, Antonio
    et al.
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Bonet, Catalina
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Affret, Aurélie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Katzke, Verena
    Schübel, Ruth
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Karakatsani, Anna
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Nøst, Theresa H.
    Lasheras, Cristina
    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Amiano, Pilar
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Dias, Joana A.
    Nilsson, Lena M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Gunter, Marc
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Tsilidis, Kostas
    Riboli, Elio
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2018In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 607-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. We assessed the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of gastric carcinoma, overall and for the 2 major subsites: cardia cancers and noncardia cancers. A total of 476,160 subjects (30% men, 70% women) from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were followed for 14 y, during which 913 incident cases of gastric carcinoma were identified, including 236 located in the cardia, 341 in the distal part of the stomach (noncardia), and 336 with overlapping or unknown tumor site. The dietary inflammatory potential was assessed by means of an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD), calculated with the use of 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory scores. The association between the ISD and gastric cancer risk was estimated by HRs and 95% CIs calculated by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for confounders. The inflammatory potential of the diet was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The HR (95% CI) for each increase in 1 SD of the ISD were 1.25 (1.12, 1.39) for all gastric cancers, 1.30 (1.06, 1.59) for cardia cancers, and 1.07 (0.89, 1.28) for noncardia cancers. The corresponding values for the highest compared with the lowest quartiles of the ISD were 1.66 (1.26, 2.20), 1.94 (1.14, 3.30), and 1.07 (0.70, 1.70), respectively. Our results suggest that low-grade chronic inflammation induced by the diet may be associated with gastric cancer risk. This pattern seems to be more consistent for gastric carcinomas located in the cardia than for those located in the distal stomach. This study is listed on the ISRCTN registry as ISRCTN12136108.

  • 24. Ahlberg, Alexander
    et al.
    Nikolaidis, Polymnia
    Engström, Therese
    Gunnarsson, Karin
    Johansson, Hemming
    Sharp, Lena
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Morbidity of supraomohyoidal and modified radical neck dissection combined with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective longitudinal study2012In: Head and Neck, ISSN 1043-3074, E-ISSN 1097-0347, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to show the investigated impact of supraomohyoidal neck dissection and modified radical neck dissection, both combined with radiotherapy, on cervical range of motion (CROM), mouth opening, swallowing, lymphedema, and shoulder function.

    METHODS: One hundred eight patients who had neck dissections and 98 patients who had non-neck dissections were evaluated in a prospective, nonselective, longitudinal cohort study by a physiotherapist and a speech-language pathologist (SLP) before the start of radiotherapy and up to 12 months after treatment.

    RESULTS: The incidence of shoulder disability after neck dissection was 18%. Supraomohyoidal neck dissection had no significant effect on the evaluated parameters at any time point. Modified radical neck dissection significantly reduced CROM and mouth opening 2 months after treatment, but after 12 months only cervical rotation was still significantly reduced.

    CONCLUSION: In patients treated with external beam radiation (EBRT), modified radical neck dissection induced additional morbidity regarding CROM but not regarding mouth opening, swallowing, and lymphedema 1 year after treatment. Both modified radical neck dissection and supraomohyoidal neck dissection induced shoulder disability.

  • 25.
    Ahlin, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nybacka, Sanna
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stranne, Johan
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Box 423, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedelin, Maria
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Box 423, Gothenburg, Sweden; Regional Cancer Center West, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effect of a phytoestrogen intervention and impact of genetic factors on tumor proliferation markers among Swedish patients with prostate cancer: study protocol for the randomized controlled PRODICA trial2022In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A high intake of phytoestrogens, found in soy, rye, and seeds, is associated with a reduced risk of a prostate cancer diagnosis. Previously, we found that the overall decreased risk of prostate cancer diagnosis in males with a high intake of phytoestrogens was strongly modified by a nucleotide sequence variant in the estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ) gene. However, we do not know if phytoestrogens can inhibit the growth of prostate cancer in males with established diseases. If there is an inhibition or a delay, there is reason to believe that different variants of the ERβ gene will modify the effect. Therefore, we designed an intervention study to investigate the effect of the addition of foods high in phytoestrogens and their interaction with the ERβ genotype on prostate tumor proliferation in patients with prostate cancer.

    Method: The PRODICA trial is a randomized ongoing intervention study in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer with a Gleason score < 8, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) < 20, and scheduled for radical prostatectomy. The study is conducted at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden. The intervention consists of a daily intake of soybeans and flaxseeds (~ 200 mg of phytoestrogens) until the surgery, approximately 6 weeks. The aim is to recruit 200 participants. The primary outcome is the difference in the proliferation marker Ki-67 between the intervention and the control groups. The genotype of ERβ will be investigated as an effect-modifying factor. Secondary outcomes include, e.g., concentrations of PSA and steroid hormones in the blood.

    Discussion: The results of the PRODICA trial will contribute important information on the relevance of increasing the intake of phytoestrogens in patients with prostate cancer who want to make dietary changes to improve the prognosis of their cancer. If genetic factors turn out to influence the effect of the intervention diet, dietary advice can be given to patients who most likely benefit from it. Dietary interventions are cost-effective, non-invasive, and result in few mild side effects. Lastly, the project will provide basic pathophysiological insights which could be relevant to the development of treatment strategies for patients with prostate cancer.

    Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02759380. Registered on 3 May 2016.

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  • 26.
    Ahlin, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nørskov, Natalja P.
    Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Aarhus University, AU-Foulum, Tjele, Denmark.
    Nybacka, Sanna
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Department of Life Sciences, Division of Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skokic, Viktor
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pelvic Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stranne, Johan
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedelin, Maria
    Department of Oncology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Regional Cancer Center West, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects on serum hormone concentrations after a dietary phytoestrogen intervention in patients with prostate cancer: a randomized controlled trial2023In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 15, no 7, article id 1792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytoestrogens have been suggested to have an anti-proliferative role in prostate cancer, potentially by acting through estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and modulating several hormones. We primarily aimed to investigate the effect of a phytoestrogen intervention on hormone concentrations in blood depending on the ERβ genotype. Patients with low and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, scheduled for radical prostatectomy, were randomized to an intervention group provided with soybeans and flaxseeds (∼200 mg phytoestrogens/d) added to their diet until their surgery, or a control group that was not provided with any food items. Both groups received official dietary recommendations. Blood samples were collected at baseline and endpoint and blood concentrations of different hormones and phytoestrogens were analyzed. The phytoestrogen-rich diet did not affect serum concentrations of testosterone, insulin-like growth factor 1, or sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). However, we found a trend of decreased risk of increased serum concentration of estradiol in the intervention group compared to the control group but only in a specific genotype of ERβ (p = 0.058). In conclusion, a high daily intake of phytoestrogen-rich foods has no major effect on hormone concentrations but may lower the concentration of estradiol in patients with prostate cancer with a specific genetic upset of ERβ.

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  • 27.
    Akhunzianov, Almaz A.
    et al.
    Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    Nesterova, Alfiya I.
    Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation; Republican Clinical Oncology Dispensary Named after Prof. M.Z. Sigal, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    Wanrooij, Sjoerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Filina, Yulia V.
    Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    Rizvanov, Albert A.
    Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    Miftakhova, Regina R.
    Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation.
    Unravelling the Therapeutic Potential of Antibiotics in Hypoxia in a Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cell Line Model2023In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 24, no 14, article id 11540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotics inhibit breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) by suppressing mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the effectiveness of antibiotics in clinical settings is inconsistent. This inconsistency raises the question of whether the tumor microenvironment, particularly hypoxia, plays a role in the response to antibiotics. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of five commonly used antibiotics for inhibiting CSCs under hypoxia using an MCF-7 cell line model. We assessed the number of CSCs through the mammosphere formation assay and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-bright cell count. Additionally, we examined the impact of antibiotics on the mitochondrial stress response and membrane potential. Furthermore, we analyzed the levels of proteins associated with therapeutic resistance. There was no significant difference in the number of CSCs between cells cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. However, hypoxia did affect the rate of CSC inhibition by antibiotics. Specifically, azithromycin was unable to inhibit sphere formation in hypoxia. Erythromycin and doxycycline did not reduce the ratio of ALDH-bright cells, despite decreasing the number of mammospheres. Furthermore, treatment with chloramphenicol, doxycycline, and tetracycline led to the overexpression of the breast cancer resistance protein. Our findings suggest that hypoxia may weaken the inhibitory effects of antibiotics on the breast cancer model.

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  • 28. Aksnessaether, Bjorg Y.
    et al.
    Myklebust, Tor Age
    Solberg, Arne
    Klepp, Olbjorn H.
    Skovlund, Eva
    Hoff, Solveig Roth
    Fossa, Sophie D.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lund, Jo-Asmund
    Second Cancers in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Randomized to Lifelong Endocrine Treatment With or Without Radical Radiation Therapy: Long-Term Follow-up of the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 Trial2020In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 706-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Curative radiation therapy (RT) constitutes a cornerstone in prostate cancer (PC) treatment. We present long-term follow-up estimates for second cancer (SC) risk and overall survival (OS) in patients randomized to hormone therapy (ET) alone or combined with 70 Gy prostatic RT in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 (SPCG-7) study. We explored the effect of salvage RT (≥60 Gy to the ET group) and reported causes of death.

    Methods and Materials: The SPCG-7 study (1996-2002) was a randomized controlled trial that included 875 men with locally advanced nonmetastatic PC. In this analysis, including data from the Norwegian and Swedish Cancer and Cause of Death registries for 651 Norwegian and 209 Swedish study patients, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for SC and death, and cumulative incidences of SC.

    Results: Median follow-up of the 860 (431 ET and 429) ET + RT patients was 12.2 years for SC risk analysis and 12.6 years for the OS analysis. Eighty-three of the Norwegian ET patients received salvage RT, and median time to salvage RT was 5.9 years. We found 125 and 168 SCs in the ET and ET + RT patients, respectively. With ET alone as reference, ET + RT patients had an HR of 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-1.54) for all SCs and 2.54 (95% CI, 1.14-5.69) for urinary bladder cancer (UBC). The total number of UBC was 31 (23 in ET + RT; 8 in ET), and the vast majority (85%) were superficial. The HR for SC in salvage RT patients was 0.48 (95% CI, 0.24-0.94). Median OS was 12.8 (95% CI, 11.8-13.8) and 15.3 (95%, CI 14.3-16.4) years in the ET and ET + RT groups, respectively. Compared with ET alone, the risk of death was reduced in ET + RT patients (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.62-0.86) and in ET patients receiving salvage RT (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.30-0.65).

    Conclusions: Although the risk of UBC was increased in PC patients who received RT in addition to ET, this disadvantage is outweighed by the OS benefit of RT confirmed in our study. The risk of SC, and especially UBC, should be discussed with patients and be reflected in follow-up programs.

  • 29.
    Alcala, Karine
    et al.
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Genomic Epidemiology Branch, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, Lyon, France.
    Mariosa, Daniela
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Genomic Epidemiology Branch, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, Lyon, France.
    Smith-Byrne, Karl
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Oxford Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Nasrollahzadeh Nesheli, Dariush
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Genomic Epidemiology Branch, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, Lyon, France.
    Carreras-Torres, Robert
    Group of Digestive Diseases and Microbiota, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Girona-IDIBGI, Salt, Spain.
    Ardanaz Aicua, Eva
    Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
    Bondonno, Nicola P
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia; Institute for Nutrition Research, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Bonet, Catalina
    Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology, ICO, Nutrition and Cancer Group, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-(IDIBELL), l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, Bas
    Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain.
    Christakoudi, Sofia
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom; MRC Centre for Transplantation, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Heath, Alicia K
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Katzke, Verena
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Martin, Richard M
    Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    May, Anne
    Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Melander, Olle
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Emergency and Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palli, Domenico
    Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network (ISPRO), Florence, Italy.
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs. GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, Madrid, Spain.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Cittàdella Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital, Turin, Italy.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Chanock, Stephen
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, MD, Bethesda, United States.
    Purdue, Mark
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, MD, Bethesda, United States.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Lyon, France.
    Muller, David
    Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Brennan, Paul
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Genomic Epidemiology Branch, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, Lyon, France.
    Johansson, Mattias
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), Genomic Epidemiology Branch, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, Lyon, France.
    The relationship between blood pressure and risk of renal cell carcinoma2022In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 1317-1327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relation between blood pressure and kidney cancer risk is well established but complex and different study designs have reported discrepant findings on the relative importance of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). In this study, we sought to describe the temporal relation between diastolic and SBP with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk in detail. Methods: Our study involved two prospective cohorts: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study and UK Biobank, including >700 000 participants and 1692 incident RCC cases. Risk analyses were conducted using flexible parametric survival models for DBP and SBP both separately as well as with mutuality adjustment and then adjustment for extended risk factors. We also carried out univariable and multivariable Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses (DBP: ninstruments = 251, SBP: ninstruments = 213) to complement the analyses of measured DBP and SBP. Results: In the univariable analysis, we observed clear positive associations with RCC risk for both diastolic and SBP when measured ≥5 years before diagnosis and suggestive evidence for a stronger risk association in the year leading up to diagnosis. In mutually adjusted analysis, the long-term risk association of DBP remained, with a hazard ratio (HR) per standard deviation increment 10 years before diagnosis (HR10y) of 1.20 (95% CI: 1.10-1.30), whereas the association of SBP was attenuated (HR10y: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91-1.10). In the complementary multivariable MR analysis, we observed an odds ratio for a 1-SD increment (ORsd) of 1.34 (95% CI: 1.08-1.67) for genetically predicted DBP and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56-0.88) for genetically predicted SBP. Conclusion: The results of this observational and MR study are consistent with an important role of DBP in RCC aetiology. The relation between SBP and RCC risk was less clear but does not appear to be independent of DBP.

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  • 30. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Bamia, Christina
    Drogan, Dagmar
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Jenab, Mazda
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Pischon, Tobias
    Tsilidis, Kostas
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Bouton-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Racine, Antoine
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Tsironis, Christos
    Papatesta, Eleni-Maria
    Saitakis, George
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Lukic, Marko
    Braaten, Tonje
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Sanchez, Mara-Jose
    Chilarque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanas, Eva
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Wallström, Peter
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Bradbury, Kathryn E.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Duarte-Salles, Talita
    Assi, Nada
    Murphy, Neil
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    The association of coffee intake with liver cancer risk is mediated by biomarkers of inflammation and hepatocellular injury: data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition2015In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 102, no 6, p. 1498-1508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Higher coffee intake has been purportedly related to a lower risk of liver cancer. However, it remains unclear whether this association may be accounted for by specific biological mechanisms. Objective: We aimed to evaluate the potential mediating roles of inflammatory, metabolic, liver injury, and iron metabolism biomarkers on the association between coffee intake and the primary form of liver cancer-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Design: We conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition among 125 incident HCC cases matched to 250 controls using an incidence-density sampling procedure. The association of coffee intake with HCC risk was evaluated by using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression that accounted for smoking, alcohol consumption, hepatitis infection, and other established liver cancer risk factors. The mediating effects of 21 biomarkers were evaluated on the basis of percentage changes and associated 95% CIs in the estimated regression coefficients of models with and without adjustment for biomarkers individually and in combination. Results: The multivariable-adjusted RR of having >= 4 cups (600mL) coffee/d compared with <2 cups (300 mL)/d was 0.25 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.62; P-trend = 0.006). A statistically significant attenuation of the association between coffee intake and HCC risk and thereby suspected mediation was confirmed for the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 and for the biomarkers of hepatocellular injury glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and total bilirubin, which-in combination-attenuated the regression coefficients by 72% (95% CI: 7%, 239%). Of the investigated biomarkers, IL-6, AST, and GGT produced the highest change in the regression coefficients: 40%, 56%, and 60%, respectively. Conclusion: These data suggest that the inverse association of coffee intake with HCC risk was partly accounted for by biomarkers of inflammation and hepatocellular injury.

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  • 31. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H
    Jansen, Eugene
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Riboli, Elio
    Romaguera, Dora
    Overvad, Kim
    Ostergaard, Jane Nautrup
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Morois, Sophie
    Masala, Giovanna
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Naska, Androniki
    Bamia, Christina
    Peeters, Petra H
    Rodríguez, Laudina
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sánchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Huerta, Jose-María
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Allen, Naomi E
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K
    Pischon, Tobias
    Metabolic syndrome and risks of colon and rectal cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study.2011In: Cancer prevention research (Philadelphia, Pa.), ISSN 1940-6215, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1873-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is purportedly related to risk of developing colorectal cancer; however, the association of MetS, as defined according to recent international criteria, and colorectal cancer has not been yet evaluated. In particular, it remains unclear to what extent the MetS components individually account for such an association. We addressed these issues in a nested case-control study that included 1,093 incident cases matched (1:1) to controls by using incidence density sampling. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% CIs. MetS was defined according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATPIII), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and the 2009 harmonized definition. Among individual components, abdominal obesity (RR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.16-1.96) was associated with colon cancer, whereas abnormal glucose metabolism was associated with both colon (RR = 2.05; 95% CI: 1.57-2.68) and rectal cancer (RR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.45-2.96). MetS, as defined by each of the definitions, was similarly associated with colon cancer (e.g., RR = 1.91; 95% CI: 1.47-2.42 for MetS by NCEP/ATPIII), whereas MetS by NCEP/ATPIII, but not IDF or harmonized definition, was associated with rectal cancer (RR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.02-2.06). Overall, these associations were stronger in women than in men. However, the association between MetS and colorectal cancer was accounted for by abdominal obesity and abnormal glucose metabolism such that MetS did not provide risk information beyond these components (likelihood ratio test P = 0.10 for MetS by NCEP/ATPIII). These data suggest that simple assessment of abnormal glucose metabolism and/or abdominal obesity to identify individuals at colorectal cancer risk may have higher clinical utility than applying more complex MetS definitions. Cancer Prev Res; 4(11); 1873-83. ©2011 AACR.

  • 32. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Jansen, Eugene
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Riboli, Elio
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Westphal, Sabine
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Racine, Antoine
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Pala, Valeria
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Amiano, Pilar
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Menendez, Virginia
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Allen, Naomi E.
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nickolas
    Pischon, Tobias
    Leptin and soluble leptin receptor in risk of colorectal cancer in the European prospective investigation into Cancer and nutrition cohort2012In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 72, no 20, p. 5328-5337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leptin, a peptide hormone produced primarily by the adipocytes, is hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) may regulate leptin's physiologic functions; however its relation to CRC risk is unknown. This study explored the association of leptin and sOB-R with risk of CRC in a prospective nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 1,129 incident CRC cases (713 colon, 416 rectal) were matched within risk sets to 1,129 controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). After multivariable adjustment including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and baseline leptin concentrations, sOB-R was strongly inversely associated with CRC (RR comparing the highest quintile vs. the lowest, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.40-0.76; P-trend = 0.0004) and colon cancer (RR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.28-0.63, P-trend = 0.0001); whereas no association was seen for rectal cancer (RR adjusted for BMI and waist circumference, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.48-1.44, P-trend = 0.38). In contrast, leptin was not associated with risk of CRC (RR adjusted for BMI and waist circumference, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.56-1.29, P-trend = 0.23). Additional adjustments for circulating metabolic biomarkers did not attenuate these results. These novel findings suggest a strong inverse association between circulating sOB-R and CRC risk, independent of obesity measures, leptin concentrations, and other metabolic biomarkers. Further research is needed to confirm the potentially important role of sOB-R in CRC pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 72(20); 5328-37. (C) 2012 AACR.

  • 33. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Jansen, Eugene
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel JB
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Riboli, Elio
    Romaguera, Dora
    Westphal, Sabine
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Saieva, Calogero
    Vineis, Paolo
    Tumino, Rosario
    Peeters, Petra H
    Argüelles, Marcial
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sánchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Huerta, Jose-María
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Allen, Naomi E
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Pischon, Tobias
    Total and high-molecular-weight adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study2012In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 1211-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adiponectin - an adipose-tissue-derived protein may provide a molecular link between obesity and colorectal cancer (CRC), but evidence from large prospective studies is limited. In particular, no epidemiological study explored high-molecular-weight (HMW) and non-HMW adiponectin fractions in relation to CRC risk, despite they were hypothesised to have differential biological activities, i.e. regulating insulin sensitivity (HMW-adiponectin) versus inflammatory response (non-HMW-adiponectin). In a prospective nested case-control study we investigated whether pre-diagnostic serum concentrations of total, HMW and non-HMW-adiponectin are associated with risk of CRC, independent of obesity and other known CRC risk factors. A total of 1206 incident cases (755 colon, 451 rectal) were matched to 1206 controls using incidence density sampling. In conditional logistic regression, adjusted for dietary and lifestyle factors, total adiponectin and non-HMW-adiponectin concentrations were inversely associated with risk of CRC [relative risk (RR) comparing highest versus lowest quintile = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.53-0.95, P (trend)=0.03 for total adiponectin and 0.45, 95%CI=0.34-0.61, P (trend)<0.0001 for non-HMW-adiponectin]. HMW-adiponectin concentrations were not associated with CRC risk (RR=0.91, 95%CI=0.68-1.22, P (trend)=0.55). Non-HMW-adiponectin was associated with CRC risk even after adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference (RR=0.39, 95%CI=0.26-0.60, P (trend)<0.0001); whereas the association with total adiponectin was no longer significant (RR=0.81, 95%CI=0.60-1.09, P (trend)=0.23). When stratified by cancer site, non-HMW-adiponectin was inversely associated with both colon and rectal cancer. These findings suggest an important role of the relative proportion of non-HMW-adiponectin in CRC pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these results and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  • 34. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Nöthlings, Ute
    Jenab, Mazda
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova-McGregor, Annekatrin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Trepo, Elisabeth
    Westhpal, Sabine
    Duarte-Salles, Talita
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Racine, Antoine
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Bamia, Christina
    Benetou, Vassiliki
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H
    Gram, Inger Torhild
    Lund, Eiliv
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Agudo, Antonio
    Sánchez, María-José
    Gavrila, Diana
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Travis, Ruth C
    Riboli, Elio
    Pischon, Tobias
    Inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers and risk of liver and bilary tract cancer2014In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 858-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity and associated metabolic disorders have been implicated in liver carcinogenesis; however there is little data on the role of obesity-related biomarkers on liver cancer risk. We studied prospectively the association of inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers with risks of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intra-hepatic bile duct (IBD) and gallbladder and bilary tract cancers outside of the liver (GBTC) in a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Over an average of 7.7 years, 296 participants developed HCC (n=125), GBTC (n=137) or IBD (n=34). Using risk set sampling, controls were selected in a 2:1 ratio and matched for recruitment center, age, sex, fasting status, time of blood collection. Baseline serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-peptide, total, high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin, leptin, fetuin-a, and glutamatdehydrogenase (GLDH) were measured and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI-s) estimated using conditional logistic regression. After adjustment for lifestyle factors, diabetes, hepatitis infection and adiposity measures, higher concentrations of CRP, IL-6, C-peptide and non-HMW adiponectin were associated with higher risk of HCC (IRR per doubling of concentrations = 1.22; 95%CI = 1.02-1.46, P=0.03; 1.90; 95%CI = 1.30-2.77, P=0.001; 2.25; 95%CI = 1.43-3.54, P=0.0005 and 2.09; 95%CI = 1.19-3.67, P=0.01, respectively). CRP was associated also with risk of GBTC (IRR = 1.22; 95%CI = 1.05-1.42, P=0.01). GLDH was associated with risks of HCC (IRR = 1.62; 95%CI = 1.25-2.11, P=0.0003) and IBD (IRR = 10.5; 95%CI = 2.20-50.90, P=0.003). The continuous net reclassification index was 0.63 for CRP, IL-6, C-peptide and non-HMW adiponectin, and 0.46 for GLDH indicating good predictive ability of these biomarkers. Conclusion: Elevated levels of biomarkers of inflammation and hyperinsulinemia are associated with a higher risk of HCC, independent of obesity and established liver cancer risk factors.

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  • 35. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Chuang, Shu-Chun
    Boeing, Heiner
    Zuo, Hui
    Tell, Grethe S
    Pischon, Tobias
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Vollset, Stein Emil
    Midttun, Øivind
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Johansson, Mattias
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Severi, Gianluca
    Racine, Antoine
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kühn, Tilman
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Sánchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Travis, Ruth C
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Panico, Salvatore
    May, Anne M
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kong, So Yeon J
    Freisling, Heinz
    Gunter, Marc J
    Lu, Yunxia
    Cross, Amanda J
    Riboli, Elio
    Vineis, Paolo
    A prospective study of the immune system activation biomarker neopterin and colorectal cancer risk2015In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 107, no 4, article id djv010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Neopterin may be relevant for colorectal cancer (CRC) development, as a biomarker of cellular immune activity exerting pleiotropic effects on cellular ageing, oxidative stress, and inflammation. So far, the association between prediagnostic neopterin and colon and rectal cancer risk has not been evaluated in human populations. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort using data on plasma concentrations of total neopterin (T-N, sum of neopterin and 7,8-dihydroneopterin) in 830 incident CRC case patients (561 colon and 269 rectal) matched within risk sets to 830 control participants. A subsequent replication study used data from the Hordaland Health Study, where 173 CRC case patients have been diagnosed among 6594 healthy participants over 12 years of follow-up. Results: After multivariable adjustment for a priori chosen CRC risk factors, a "U-shaped" association of T-N with CRC was revealed. Compared with the second quintile of the T-N distribution, the relative risks for the first, third, fourth, and fifth quintiles were 2.37 (95% CI = 1.66 to 3.39), 1.24 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.77), 1.55 (95% CI = 1.08 to 2.22), and 2.31 (95% CI = 1.63 to 3.27), respectively. Replication of these associations within the Hordaland Health Study yielded similar results. No differences have been observed when the associations were explored by colon and rectal cancer site (two-sided P-difference = .87) and after excluding case patients diagnosed within the first four follow-up years. Conclusions: These novel findings provide evidence of the role of both suppressed and activated cell-mediated immunity as reflected by prediagnostic T-N concentrations in the development of CRC.

  • 36. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Drogan, Dagmar
    Boeing, Heiner
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H
    Jansen, Eugene
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Riboli, Elio
    Gunter, Marc J
    Romaguera, Dora
    Westhpal, Sabine
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Vidalis, Pavlos
    Panico, Salvatore
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sánchez-Cruz, José-Juan
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Díaz, María José Tormo
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ramon Quiros, J
    Peeters, Petra H
    May, Anne M
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nickolas
    Pischon, Tobias
    Adiposity, mediating biomarkers and risk of colon cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study2014In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 612-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adiposity is a risk factor for colon cancer, but underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We evaluated the extent to which 11 biomarkers with inflammatory and metabolic actions mediate the association of adiposity measures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI), with colon cancer in men and women. We analyzed data from a prospective nested case-control study among 662 incident colon cancer cases matched within risk sets to 662 controls. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. The percent effect change and corresponding CIs were estimated after adjusting for biomarkers shown to be associated with colon cancer risk. After multivariable adjustment, WC was associated with colon cancer risk in men (top vs. bottom tertile RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.06-2.65; ptrend  = 0.02) and in women (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.09-2.56; ptrend  = 0.03). BMI was associated with risk only in men. The association of WC with colon cancer was accounted mostly for by three biomarkers, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-molecular-weight adiponectin and soluble leptin receptor, which in combination explained 46% (95% CI 37-57%) of the association in men and 50% (95% CI 40-65%) of the association in women. Similar results were observed for the associations with BMI in men. These data suggest that alterations in levels of these metabolic biomarkers may represent a primary mechanism of action in the relation of adiposity with colon cancer. Further studies are warranted to determine whether altering their concentrations may reduce colon cancer risk.

  • 37. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Jansen, Eugene
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Murphy, Neil
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Westhpal, Sabine
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Racine, Antoine
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Duell, Eric J.
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Pischon, Tobias
    Boeing, Heiner
    Biomarker patterns of inflammatory and metabolic pathways are associated with risk of colorectal cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)2014In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 261-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of biomarkers of inflammatory and metabolic pathways are individually related to higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the association between biomarker patterns and CRC incidence has not been previously evaluated. Our study investigates the association of biomarker patterns with CRC in a prospective nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). During median follow-up time of 7.0 (3.7-9.4) years, 1,260 incident CRC cases occurred and were matched to 1,260 controls using risk-set sampling. Pre-diagnostic measurements of C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin, triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), C-reactive protein (CRP), reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), insulin-like growth factor 1, adiponectin, leptin and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) were used to derive biomarker patterns from principal component analysis (PCA). The relation with CRC incidence was assessed using conditional logistic regression models. We identified four biomarker patterns 'HDL-C/Adiponectin fractions', 'ROM/CRP', 'TG/C-peptide' and 'leptin/sOB-R' to explain 60 % of the overall biomarker variance. In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, the 'HDL-C/Adiponectin fractions', 'ROM/CRP' and 'leptin/sOB-R' patterns were associated with CRC risk [for the highest quartile vs the lowest, incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.69, 95 % CI 0.51-0.93, P-trend = 0.01; IRR = 1.70, 95 % CI 1.30-2.23, P-trend = 0.002; and IRR = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.58-1.07; P-trend = 0.05, respectively]. In contrast, the 'TG/C-peptide' pattern was not associated with CRC risk (IRR = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.56-1.00, P-trend = 0.24). After cases within the first 2 follow-up years were excluded, the 'ROM/CRP' pattern was no longer associated with CRC risk, suggesting potential influence of preclinical disease on these associations. By application of PCA, the study identified 'HDL-C/Adiponectin fractions', 'ROM/CRP' and 'leptin/sOB-R' as biomarker patterns representing potentially important pathways for CRC development.

  • 38. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Leitzmann, Michael
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Freisling, Heinz
    Carayol, Marion
    Pischon, Tobias
    Drogan, Dagmar
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Overvad, Kim
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Bouton-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Peppa, Eleni
    Valanou, Elissavet
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    May, Anne
    van Vulpen, Jonna
    Borch, Kristin Benjaminsen
    Oyeyemi, Sunday Oluwafemi
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Navarro, Carmen
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Assi, Nada
    Ward, Heather A.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Riboli, Elio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer: insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from the EPIC cohort2017In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1823-1835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account for the association between physical activity and colon cancer. We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort of 519 978 men and women aged 25 to 70 years followed from 1992 to 2003. A total of 713 incident colon cancer cases were matched, using risk-set sampling, to 713 controls on age, sex, study centre, fasting status and hormonal therapy use. The amount of total physical activity during the past year was expressed in metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-h/week. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected at study baseline. High physical activity was associated with a lower risk of colon cancer: relative risk a parts per thousand<yen>91 MET-h/week vs < 91 MET-h/week = 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57 to 0.96]. In mediation analyses, this association was accounted for by waist circumference: proportion explained effect (PEE) = 17%; CI: 4% to 52%; and the biomarkers soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R): PEE = 15%; 95% CI: 1% to 50% and 5-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D): PEE = 30%; 95% CI: 12% to 88%. In combination, these factors explained 45% (95% CI: 20% to 125%) of the association. Beyond waist circumference, sOB-R and 25[OH]D additionally explained 10% (95% CI: 1%; 56%) and 23% (95% CI: 6%; 111%) of the association, respectively. Promoting physical activity, particularly outdoors, and maintaining metabolic health and adequate vitamin D levels could represent a promising strategy for colon cancer prevention.

  • 39. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Pischon, Tobias
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Norat, Teresa
    Romaguera, Dora
    Knüppel, Sven
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Dartois, Laureen
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Li, Kuanrong
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Quirós, José Ramón
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sánchez, María José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Bradbury, Kathryn E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Siersema, Peter D
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Borch, Kristin
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Kong, Joyce
    Gunter, Marc J
    Ward, Heather A
    Riboli, Elio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Combined impact of healthy lifestyle factors on colorectal cancer: a large European cohort study2014In: BMC Medicine, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 168-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Excess body weight, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and certain dietary factors are individually related to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk; however, little is known about their joint effects. The aim of this study was to develop a healthy lifestyle index (HLI) composed of five potentially modifiable lifestyle factors - healthy weight, physical activity, non-smoking, limited alcohol consumption and a healthy diet, and to explore the association of this index with CRC incidence using data collected within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: In the EPIC cohort, a total of 347,237 men and women, 25- to 70-years old, provided dietary and lifestyle information at study baseline (1992 to 2000). Over a median follow-up time of 12 years, 3,759 incident CRC cases were identified. The association between a HLI and CRC risk was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and population attributable risks (PARs) have been calculated. RESULTS: After accounting for study centre, age, sex and education, compared with 0 or 1 healthy lifestyle factors, the hazard ratio (HR) for CRC was 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44 to 0.77) for two factors, 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70 to 0.89) for three factors, 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58 to 0.75) for four factors and 0.63 (95% CI: 0.54 to 0.74) for five factors; P-trend <0.0001. The associations were present for both colon and rectal cancers, HRs, 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50 to 0.74; P for trend <0.0001) for colon cancer and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.88; P-trend <0.0001) for rectal cancer, respectively (P-difference by cancer sub-site = 0.10). Overall, 16% of the new CRC cases (22% in men and 11% in women) were attributable to not adhering to a combination of all five healthy lifestyle behaviours included in the index. CONCLUSIONS: Combined lifestyle factors are associated with a lower incidence of CRC in European populations characterized by western lifestyles. Prevention strategies considering complex targeting of multiple lifestyle factors may provide practical means for improved CRC prevention.

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  • 40.
    Alevronta, Eleftheria
    et al.
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Alexander
    Department of Otolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mavroidis, Panayiotis
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    al-Abany, Massoud
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Friesland, Signe
    Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tilikidis, Aris
    Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Lind, Bengt K
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dose-response relations for stricture in the proximal oesophagus from head and neck radiotherapy2010In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Determination of the dose-response relations for oesophageal stricture after radiotherapy of the head and neck.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study 33 patients who developed oesophageal stricture and 39 patients as controls are included. The patients received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. For each patient the 3D dose distribution delivered to the upper 5 cm of the oesophagus was analysed. The analysis was conducted for two periods, 1992-2000 and 2001-2005, due to the different irradiation techniques used. The fitting has been done using the relative seriality model.

    RESULTS: For the treatment period 1992-2005, the mean doses were 49.8 and 33.4 Gy, respectively, for the cases and the controls. For the period 1992-2000, the mean doses for the cases and the controls were 49.9 and 45.9 Gy and for the period 2001-2005 were 49.8 and 21.4 Gy. For the period 2001-2005 the best estimates of the dose-response parameters are D(50)=61.5 Gy (52.9-84.9 Gy), γ=1.4 (0.8-2.6) and s=0.1 (0.01-0.3).

    CONCLUSIONS: Radiation-induced strictures were found to have a dose response relation and volume dependence (low relative seriality) for the treatment period 2001-2005. However, no dose response relation was found for the complete material.

  • 41.
    Alexandra, Wide
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Johan
    Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre Mellansverige, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Department of Gynecologic Cancer, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University Hospital.
    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecology and Reproduction, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Olof
    Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fertility-related information received by young women and men with cancer: a population-based survey2021In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 976-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Infertility is a well-known sequela of cancer treatment. Despite guidelines recommending early discussions about risk of fertility impairment and fertility preservation options, not all patients of reproductive age receive such information.

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate young adult cancer patients' receipt of fertility-related information and use of fertility preservation, and to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with receipt of information.

    Materials and methods: A population-based cross-sectional survey study was conducted with 1010 young adults with cancer in Sweden (response rate 67%). The inclusion criteria were: a previous diagnosis of breast cancer, cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, brain tumor, lymphoma or testicular cancer between 2016 and 2017, at an age between 18 and 39 years. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models.

    Results: A majority of men (81%) and women (78%) reported having received information about the potential impact of cancer/treatment on their fertility. A higher percentage of men than women reported being informed about fertility preservation (84% men vs. 40% women, p < .001) and using gamete or gonadal cryopreservation (71% men vs. 15% women, p < .001). Patients with brain tumors and patients without a pretreatment desire for children were less likely to report being informed about potential impact on their fertility and about fertility preservation. In addition, being born outside Sweden was negatively associated with reported receipt of information about impact of cancer treatment on fertility. Among women, older age (>35 years), non-heterosexuality and being a parent were additional factors negatively associated with reported receipt of information about fertility preservation.

    Conclusion: There is room for improvement in the equal provision of information about fertility issues to young adult cancer patients.

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  • 42. Alexandrie, A K
    et al.
    Warholm, M
    Carstensen, Ulrica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Axmon, A
    Hagmar, L
    Levin, Jan-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ostman, C
    Rannug, A
    CYP1A1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms affect urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels after PAH exposure2000In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 669-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Certain human biotransformation enzymes have been implicated in the formation and scavenging of the ultimate reactive metabolites, the diolepoxides, from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the present study, performed on aluminum smelter workers, we have analyzed airborne PAH, the pyrene metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) in urine, and genotypes for biotransformation enzymes involved in PAH metabolism. The aim was to evaluate the correlation between external exposure and biomarkers of exposure and to investigate to what extent genetic polymorphism in metabolic enzymes can explain interindividual variation in urinary 1-OHP levels. DNA was prepared from blood samples from 98 potroom workers and 55 controls and altogether eight polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, mEH, GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes were analyzed. The 1-OHP excretion was found to correlate significantly (P </= 0.005) to the exposure. The interindividual difference in excretion of 1-OHP was vast (>100-fold) and univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to find the variables that could determine differences in excretion. The variation could, to some degree, be explained by differences in exposure to airborne particulate-associated PAHs, the use of personal respiratory protection devices, smoking habits and genetic polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 1A1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 enzymes. The part of the variance that could be explained by differences in biotransformation genotypes seemed to be of the same order of magnitude as the variance explained by differences in exposure. In the control group as well as in the occupationally exposed group, the highest 1-OHP levels were observed in individuals carrying the CYP1A1 Ile/Val genotype who were also of the GSTM1 null genotype. The results show that urinary 1-OHP is a sensitive indicator of recent human exposure to PAHs and that it may also to some extent reflect the interindividual variation in susceptibility to PAHs.

  • 43.
    Alexeyev, Oleg
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Bergh, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Marklund, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Association between the presence of bacterial 16S RNA in prostate specimens taken during transurethral resection of prostate and subsequent risk of prostate cancer (Sweden)2006In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1127-1133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study bacterial 16S RNA in archival prostate samples from 352 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and evaluate whether the presence of bacterial DNA was different in those who later developed prostate cancer (n = 171) and in the matched controls that did not progress to cancer (n = 181).

    Methods: 16S DNA PCR followed by cloning and sequencing the positive samples.

    Results: In 96/352 (27%) of the prostate tissue specimens 16S RNA were detected. Sequence analysis revealed Propionibacterium acnes as the predominant microorganism (23% of 16S RNA positive patients). The second most frequent isolate—Escherichia coli was found in 12 (12%) patients. The other isolates included Pseudomonas sp. (3 patients), Actinomyces sp. (2), Streptococcus mutans (1), Corynebacterium sp. (2),Nocardioides sp. (1), Rhodococcus sp. (1) Veillonella sp. (2). In P. acnes positive samples 62% exhibited severe histological inflammation versus 50% in the bacteria-negative group (p = 0.602). The presence of P. acnes in the prostate was associated with prostate cancer development (OR 2.17, 95% CI 0.77–6.95).

    Conclusions: This study has revealed P. acnes as the most common bacteria in the prostate in BPH. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in contributing to the development of prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer.

  • 44.
    Alhouayek, Mireille
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience. Bioanalysis and Pharmacology of Bioactive Lipids Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Fowler, Christopher J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Altered mRNA Expression of Genes Involved in Endocannabinoid Signalling in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Tongue2019In: Cancer Investigation, ISSN 0735-7907, E-ISSN 1532-4192, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 327-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (SCCOT). Here we have investigated, at the mRNA level, expression of genes coding for the components of the eCB system in tumour and non-malignant samples from SCCOT patients. Expression of NAPEPLD and PLA2G4E, coding for eCB anabolic enzymes, was higher in the tumour tissue than in non-malignant tissue. Among genes coding for eCB catabolic enzymes, expression of MGLL was lower in tumour tissue while PTGS2 was increased. It is concluded that the eCB system may be dysfunctional in SCCOT.

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  • 45.
    Alhouayek, Mireille
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Stafberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Karlsson, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Fowler, Christopher J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Effects of orthotopic implantation of rat prostate tumour cells upon components of the N-acylethanolamine and monoacylglycerol signalling systems: an mRNA study2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 6314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is good evidence that the N-acylethanolamine (NAE)/monoacylglycerol (MAG) signalling systems are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. However, it is not known how prostate tumours affect these systems in the surrounding non-malignant tissue and vice versa. In the present study we have investigated at the mRNA level 11 components of these systems (three coding for anabolic enzymes, two for NAE/MAG targets and six coding for catabolic enzymes) in rat prostate tissue following orthotopic injection of low metastatic AT1 cells and high metastatic MLL cells. The MLL tumours expressed higher levels of Napepld, coding for a key enzyme in NAE synthesis, and lower levels of Naaa, coding for the NAE hydrolytic enzyme N-acylethanolamine acid amide hydrolase than the AT1 tumours. mRNA levels of the components of the NAE/MAG signalling systems studied in the tissue surrounding the tumours were not overtly affected by the tumours. AT1 cells in culture expressed Faah, coding for the NAE hydrolytic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase, at much lower levels than Naaa. However, the ability of the intact cells to hydrolyse the NAE arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) was inhibited by an inhibitor of FAAH, but not of NAAA. Treatment of the AT1 cells with interleukin-6, a cytokine known to be involved in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, did not affect the expression of the components of the NAE/MAG system studied. It is thus concluded that in the model system studied, the tumours show different expressions of mRNA coding for key the components of the NAE/MAG system compared to the host tissue, but that these changes are not accompanied by alterations in the non-malignant tissue.

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  • 46. Ali, Alaa M. G.
    et al.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Wang, Qin
    Gago-Dominguez, M.
    Esteban Castelao, J.
    Carracedo, Angel
    Munoz Garzon, Victor
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Vrieling, Alina
    Rudolph, Anja
    Seibold, Petra
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Muranen, Taru A.
    Aaltonen, Kirsimari
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Ito, Hidemi
    Iwata, Hiroji
    Horio, Akiyo
    John, Esther M.
    Sherman, Mark
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Figueroa, Jonine
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Shah, Mitul
    Hopper, John L.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Andersson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Dossus, Laure
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Olsen, Anja
    Wishart, Gordon C.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Borgquist, Signe
    Overvad, Kim
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Amiano, Pilar
    Riboli, Elio
    Key, Tim
    Pharoah, Paul D.
    Alcohol Consumption and Survival after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Literature-Based Meta-analysis and Collaborative Analysis of Data for 29,239 Cases2014In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 934-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence for an association of alcohol consumption with prognosis after a diagnosis of breast cancer has been inconsistent. We have reviewed and summarized the published evidence and evaluated the association using individual patient data from multiple case cohorts. Methods: A MEDLINE search to identify studies published up to January 2013 was performed. We combined published estimates of survival time for "moderate drinkers" versus nondrinkers. An analysis of individual participant data using Cox regression was carried out using data from 11 case cohorts. Results: We identified 11 published studies suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Moderate postdiagnosis alcohol consumption was not associated with overall survival [HR, 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.05], but there was some evidence of better survival associated with prediagnosis consumption (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.73-0.88). Individual data on alcohol consumption for 29,239 cases with 4,839 deaths were available from the 11 case cohorts, all of which had data on estrogen receptor (ER) status. For women with ER-positive disease, there was little evidence that pre-or postdiagnosis alcohol consumption is associated with breast cancer-specific mortality, with some evidence of a negative association with all-cause mortality. On the basis of a single study, moderate postdiagnosis alcohol intake was associated with a small reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality for women with ER-negative disease. There was no association with prediagnosis intake for women with ER-negative disease. Conclusion: There was little evidence that pre- or post-diagnosis alcohol consumption is associated with breast cancer-specific mortality for women with ER-positive disease. There was weak evidence that moderate post-diagnosis alcohol intake is associated with a small reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality in ER-negative disease. Impact: Considering the totality of the evidence, moderate postdiagnosis alcohol consumption is unlikely to have a major adverse effect on the survival of women with breast cancer.

  • 47.
    Ali, Haytham
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.
    AbdelMageed, Manar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Ohlsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Detection of lymph node metastasis in colon cancer by ectopically expressed fibroblast markers FOXQ1 and THBS22023In: Frontiers in Oncology, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 13, article id 1297324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Approximately 25% of colon cancer (CC) patients having curative surgery will relapse. Therefore, it is crucial to identify patients with increased recurrence risk to offer them adjuvant chemotherapy. Three markers with prominent expression in fibroblasts: forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1), matrix metalloproteinase-11 (MMP11), and thrombospondin-2 (THBS2), and the fibroblast expressed chemokine CXCL12 were selected for studies because of the critical role of fibroblasts in the microenvironment of the tumor.

    Methods: The expression levels of the biomarkers were assessed in primary CC tumors, lymph nodes of CC patients and controls, and CC cell lines at mRNA and protein levels by real-time qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively.

    Results: FOXQ1, MMP11, and THBS2 mRNAs were expressed at significantly higher levels in primary tumors compared to normal colon (P=0.002, P<0.0001, and P<0.0001, respectively). In contrast, CXCL12 mRNA levels were higher in normal colon tissue. FOXQ1, MMP11, and THBS2 levels were also expressed at significantly higher levels in metastasis-positive lymph nodes compared to both metastasis-negative- and control nodes (P<0.0001/P=0.002, P<0.0001/P<0.0001, and P<0.0001/P<0.0001, respectively). Immuno-morphometry revealed that 30–40% of the tumor cells expressed FOXQ1, MMP11, and THBS2. FOXQ1 and THBS2 were barely detected in normal colon epithelium (P<0.0001), while MMP11 was expressed in normal colon epithelium at high levels.

    Discussion: We conclude that CC tumor cells show ectopic expression of FOXQ1 and THBS2 possibly making these tumor cells independent of fibroblast cell support. The high expression levels of these two biomarkers in metastatic lymph nodes suggest that they are potential indicators of patients at risk for recurrence.

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  • 48.
    Ali, Haytham
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    AbdelMageed, Manar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Olsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Israelsson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Utility of G protein-coupled receptor 35 expression for predicting outcome in colon cancer2019In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 41, no 6, article id 1010428319858885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The utility of mRNA and protein determinations of G protein-coupled receptor 35, that is, GPR35a (GPR35 V1) and GPR35b (GPR35 V2/3), as indicators of outcome for colon cancer patients after curative surgery was investigated. Expression levels of V1 and V2/3 GPR35, carcinoembryonic antigen and CXCL17 mRNAs were assessed in primary tumours and regional lymph nodes of 121 colon cancer patients (stage I–IV), colon cancer cell lines and control colon epithelial cells using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of G protein-coupled receptor 35 was investigated by two-colour immunohistochemistry and immunomorphometry. GPR35 V2/3 mRNA, but not V1 mRNA, was expressed in colon cancer cell lines, primary colon tumours and control colon epithelial cells. Haematoxylin and eosin positive (H&E(+)), but not H&E(–), lymph nodes expressed high levels of GPR35 V2/3 mRNA (P<0.0001). GPR35b and carcinoembryonic antigen proteins were simultaneously expressed in many colon cancer tumour cells. Kaplan–Meier and hazard ratio analysis revealed that patients with lymph nodes expressing high levels of GPR35 V2/3 mRNA and, in particular, in the group of patients with lymph nodes also expressing carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA, had a short disease-free survival time, 67 months versus 122 months at 12-year follow-up (difference: 55 months, P = 0.001; hazard ratio: 3.6, P = 0.002). In conclusion, high level expression of G protein-coupled receptor 35 V2/3 mRNA in regional lymph nodes of colon cancer patients is a sign of poor prognosis.

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  • 49.
    Ali, Haytham
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Ohlsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, SE, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    The myeloid cell biomarker EMR1 is ectopically expressed in colon cancer2021In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 209-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The microenvironment of colon cancer (CC) is heterogeneous including cells of myeloid lineage affecting tumor growth and metastasis. Two functional subtypes of myeloid cells have been identified; one (M1) is tumor-inhibitory and the other one (M2) is tumor-promoting. Whether the three myeloid markers EMR1, CD206 and CD86 are expressed only in the infiltrating myeloid cells or also in the tumor cells was investigated.

    METHODS: Expression of the myeloid markers was investigated in CC at the mRNA and protein levels in primary tumors and lymph nodes. mRNA expression was also determined in 5 CC cell lines. Protein expression was investigated by two-color immunofluorescence and consecutive-sections-immune-staining combined with morphometry using specific antibodies for the myeloid cell markers and the epithelial cell markers CEACAM5 and EpCAM.

    RESULTS: EMR1 and CD86, but not CD206, mRNA levels were significantly higher in CC primary tumors compared to apparently normal colon tissue (P <  0.0001). EMR1 mRNA levels were significantly higher in both hematoxylin-eosin positive (H&E(+)) and H&E(-) lymph nodes of CC patients compared to control nodes (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively). EMR1 and CD206 mRNAs were expressed in 4/5 and 5/5 CC cell lines, respectively, while CD86 mRNA was not expressed. Immuno-morphometry revealed that about 20% of the tumor cells expressed EMR1 and CD206. Positive cells were tumor cells as revealed by anti-CEACAM5 and anti-EpCAM staining. The number of EMR1, CD206 and CD86 positive cells were significantly increased in CC primary tumors compared to normal colon tissue (P <  0.0001). However, CD206 was also expressed in normal colonocytes. Only EMR1 showed significantly increased numbers of positive tumor cells in H&E(+) nodes compared to H&E(-) nodes (P = 0.001). EMR1 expression in CC tumor cells correlated with CXCL17 expressing tumor cells.

    CONCLUSION: EMR1, like the chemokine CXCL17, is ectopically expressed in colon cancer possibly in the same cancer cells.

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  • 50.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    BioReperia AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anna
    BioReperia AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Vildevall, Malin
    BioReperia AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rizzo, Larissa
    BioReperia AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Huge, Ylva
    Region Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    BioReperia AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse DE
    BioReperia AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Abstract 6124: Translation of zebrafish tumor-derived xenograft-models for improved diagnosis and treatment planning in urinary bladder cancer patients2020In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 80, no 6 Supplement, p. 6124-6124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Precision medicine in oncology aims to identify the most effective treatment for any given patient based on individualized analyses of patient material. Currently, precision medicine relies on sequencing of DNA or RNA to identify patient tumor-specific mutational profiles that may be coupled to drug response. These techniques, however, fail to reveal actionable mutations in approximately 85% of the cancer patients, and have not been established at all for many commonly used drugs including cisplatin-based treatments used in urinary bladder cancer. While mouse-PDX models can determine drug response rates with high accuracy in most patients and for most drugs, such techniques are too slow and expensive to be relevant for first line treatment planning. Urinary bladder cancer patients are often treated with cisplatin-containing combination therapy, with the hope of down-staging tumors before surgery. 60%, however, do not respond or even progress on this treatment, and these patients would benefit from immediate surgery upon diagnosis. To help identify non-responding patients, we show here that patient-derived tumor xenograft models can be established in zebrafish larvae (ZTX models) and that the resulting tumors exhibit differential responses to the two main cisplatin-containing treatments GC and MVAC.Preliminary results from the first 19 patients are presented. Two tumor biopsies were destroyed during transport and two did not allow isolation of sufficient viable cells for implantation. From the remaining 15 samples an average of 2,6 million cells with average viability of 53% were isolated and used to implant at least 60 2-days old larvae. All 15 samples implanted in the larvae and survived and/or grew exhibiting varying degrees of metastatic dissemination (average between 2 and 13 metastasized cells per embryo and model) within only three days from implantation. Four ZTX models exhibited different responses to GC and MVAC demonstrating that these treatments are not equally effective in all patients. Non-response in ZTX models was associated with tumors having re-appeared in the bladder upon radical cystectomy in all patients undergoing surgery prior to Dec. 5th 2019 (n=3). GC inhibited metastasis in all models (average 69% inhibition), whereas MVAC inhibited metastasis in 40% of the models (average 36% inhibition).In conclusion: The ZTX urinary bladder cancer platform presented here overcome limitations associated with long assay time and high cost of other functional models within precision medicine as well as the low hit-rate of actionable mutations associated with genomic techniques. ZTX models will therefore likely become a powerful method for functional precision medicine within oncology, in the near future.

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