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  • 1. Aazh, Hashir
    et al.
    Knipper, Marlies
    Danesh, Ali A.
    Cavanna, Andrea E.
    Andersson, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Paulin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schecklmann, Martin
    Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    Insights from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis: Causes, Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment2018In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 20, no 95, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hyperacusis is intolerance of certain everyday sounds that causes significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, recreational, and other day-to-day activities. 

    Objective: The aim of this report is to summarize the key findings and conclusions from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis.

    Topics covered: The main topics discussed comprise (1) diagnosis of hyperacusis and audiological evaluations, (2) neurobiological aspect of hyperacusis, (3) misophonia, (4) hyperacusis in autism spectrum disorder, (5) noise sensitivity, (6) hyperacusis-related distress and comorbid psychiatric illness, and (7) audiologist-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for hyperacusis.

    Conclusions: Implications for research and clinical practice are summarised.

  • 2.
    Abildgaard, Johan Simonsen
    et al.
    Department of Organization, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark; The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Tafvelin, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Christensen, Marit
    Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Special issue editorial: new perspectives on workplace interventions2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, E-ISSN 2002-2867, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current special issue is to promote and foster development, debate, and knowledge of workplace Interventions. It is fitting that SJWOP, being a Scandinavian journal, has taken on the task of foregrounding intervention research. Scandinavian work and organizational psychologists have since the late 1990’s been at the forefront of the development of research into organizational interventions, for example by promoting a focus on not only effect, but also on process evaluation. This tradition has been kept alive by new generations of Scandinavian researcher who share the ideals of increasing our knowledge about the working mechanisms of interventions. But organizational interventions have proven to be much broader than just participatory interventions, and the current special issue contains a range of intervention approaches and methodological approaches. The papers in the special issue each present different areas and approaches in advancing our knowledge about interventions. We are pleased to publish both conceptual papers on evaluation and new forms of intervention as well as evaluations of interventions expanding our methodological toolbox.

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  • 3.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Sandberg, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention.

    METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles.

    RESULTS: A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase".

    CONCLUSION: We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in diet intervention.

  • 4.
    Ahlin, Klas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Konradsson-Åström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    SAMBAND MELLAN KBT-TERAPEUTERS KOMPETENS OCH ANVÄNDNING AV MINDFULNESS I TERAPI: - olika typer av kompetens och deras betydelse2022Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The science about competence in Mindfulness-Based Interventions, MBI is still scarceand unclear. It has for example so far not been able to show that MBI-competence effects treatment outcome. Other correlations have also not yet been found. The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between Swedish cognitive behavioural therapists’ level of competence in MBI, and their proneness of using MBI in therapy. The study grouped competence as self-assessed competence, formal competence (level of MBI education), and informal competence (level of own practise). The study was designed as a cross-sectional, web survey-based study. 71 therapists, with an average age of 55, responded. The study found that there was a statistically significant correlationbetween MBI competence and use of MBI in individual therapy, and that informal competence best predicted MBI use. Most therapists (74 %) said that formal MBI competence was rather or very important, while 86 % found informal MBI competence rather or very important. The conclusion was that the higher level of MBI competence, the more therapists used MBI in the individual therapy they offered. And it was informal competence that best explained the therapist's proneness to use MBI. To increase the availability of MBI, informal competence should thus be encouraged.

  • 5.
    Ahmad, Zubair
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mumtaz, Jasim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Implementation of Activity Theory in Umeå University Library2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology is playing a vital role in our every field of life. The most common use of information is in the field of education. Use of information technology in libraries is very important. People from differents works of life extract information from these libraries. In this paper, we have tried to identify how can we facilitate the Umeå university library users for better interaction with the information? We have used different methods for collection of data to identify the Umeå university libray problems and then we analysed the whole library system with the help of Engeström Activity theory, to find out which factors are effeting the interaction between users and library and creating main problems. In the end we have given some suggestions for the improvement of interaction between users and Umeå library to facilitate them for accessing information.

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    Implementation of Activity Theory in Umeå University Library
  • 6.
    Allan, Veronica
    et al.
    School of Kinesiology & Health Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada.
    Turnnidge, Jennifer
    School of Kinesiology & Health Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada.
    Vierimaa, Matthew
    Department of Kinesiology & Health Science, Utah State University, Logan, USA.
    Davis, Paul A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Côté, Jean
    School of Kinesiology & Health Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada.
    Development of the Assessment of Coach Emotions systematic observation instrument: A tool to evaluate coaches’ emotions in the youth sport context2016In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 859-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research on emotions in sport focuses heavily on athletes’ intrapersonal emotion regulation; however, interpersonal consequences of emotion regulation are garnering recent attention. As leaders in sport, coaches have the opportunity to regulate not only their own emotions, but also those of athletes, officials, and spectators. As such, the present study set out to develop an observational tool, demonstrating evidence of validity and reliability, for measuring coaches’ overt emotions in the youth sport context. Categories were derived and refined through extensive literature and video review, resulting in 12 categories of behavioural content and eight emotion modifiers (NeutralHappyAffectionateAlertTenseAnxiousAngry and Disappointed). The final coding system is presented herein, complete with supporting evidence for validity and reliability. As a tool for both researchers and practitioners in sport, the Assessment of Coach Emotions (ACE) offers enhanced insight into the contextual qualities underlying coaches’ interactive behaviours.

  • 7.
    Allbrink, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundin, Rebecka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    INDIVIDUELLA IDROTTARES FÖRUTSÄTTNINGAR FÖR SJÄLVREGLERAT LÄRANDE2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) has proven to be a useful strategy for athletes' learning and development. What conditions are given to athletes from their surrounding environment can both promote and inhibit these processes of learning and development. However, few studies have examined this relationship in a sports context. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate Self-Regulated Learning in individual sports based on self-efficacy, gender and environmental conditions. The environmental conditions were defined as leadership behaviors that promote motivation, according to Self-Determination Theory (SDT), and Self-Regulated Learning. The sample consisted of individual athletes, ranging from 16-60 years, with a coach (N = 251). The athletes competed in 28 different individual sports and identified themselves as women (n = 144), men (n = 106) and other (n = 1). The participants answered the self-report questionnaires Self-Regulated Learning in Sport Practice (SRL-SP), Self-Regulated Environment (SRE) and Interpersonal Supportiveness Scale - Coach (ISS-C). Using multiple and hierarchical regression analyses, this study provided support that self-efficacy positively influenced the outcome measures planning, monitoring, and reflection, but not effort. Gender did not appear to moderate this relationship. The environmental conditions associated with SRL was mainly the coaches' ability to create opportunities for SRL. Additionally, athletes' SRL were negatively influenced by how often the coach was present. The conclusion is that athletes, to beneficially engage in their own development, need to have a belief in their own ability and also be in an environment that enhances opportunities for SRL. However, this relationship is influenced by the coach's presence at practice. Future studies can further examine the relationship between the environmental conditions and SRL, and if the results may differ depending on sport.

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    Individuella idrottares förutsättningar för självreglerat lärande
  • 8.
    Al-Mahdawi, Abdullah Mohammad
    et al.
    University of Tabuk, College of Education and Arts, Department of Education and Psychology, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
    Dutton, Edward
    Asbiro University, Poland.
    Osman, Habab Abdelhiy Mohammad
    University of Tabuk, College of Education and Arts, Department of Education and Psychology, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
    Bakhiet, Salaheldin Farah
    King Saud University, Department of Special Education, College of Education, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Mohammad, Najmai Ali
    University of Tabuk, College of Education and Arts, Department of Education and Psychology, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
    Khair, Sarah
    Clinical Psychologist, United Arab Emirates.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sex differences in malevolent creativity among Sudanese students2022In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 196, article id 111724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malevolent creativity refers to employing creative processes for one's own selfish gain, often combined with detrimental effects on others. Sex differences in malevolent or negative creativity are to be expected due to the established finding that males are higher in the Dark Triad traits. However, the only previous study of this issue, using a sample of Indian students, did not find a sex difference. Here, we administered the Malevolent Creativity Behaviour Scale (MCBS) to a sample of 1619 Sudanese students, and found a small sex difference in that females rated themselves higher. Reasons for the finding are explored, including possible problems with the MCBS instrument.

  • 9.
    Appleby, Ralph
    et al.
    The Talented Athlete Scholarship Scheme (TASS), Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
    Davis, Paul Anthony
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Davis, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vickery, Will
    Coaching and Officiating, Sport Australia, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Preliminary Psychometric Validation of the Teammate Burnout Questionnaire2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 894308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to provide support for the validation of the Teammate Burnout Questionnaire (TBQ). Athletes from a variety of team sports (N = 290) completed the TBQ and the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed acceptable fit indexes for the three-dimensional models (i.e., physical and emotional exhaustion, sport devaluation, reduced accomplishment) of the TBQ and the ABQ. Multi-trait multi-method analysis revealed that the TBQ and ABQ showed acceptable convergent and discriminant validity. The preliminary validation of the TBQ indicates the utility of the scale to reflect athletes' perceptions of their teammates' burnout and offers researchers the opportunity to quantitatively assess an important aspect of the social environment in the development of athlete burnout.

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  • 10.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oxford textbook of psychotherapy2006In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 113, p. 159-Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Social work.
    Armelius, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Social work.
    UBÅT: En ny metod för uppföljning och beskrivning av åtgärder i missbruksvård2016In: Socionomen, ISSN 0283-1929, no 4, p. 14-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 12.
    Armelius, Kerstin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Engström, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brännström, Jan
    Nyström, Siv
    Brukarna är nöjda med missbruksvården - även om problemen inte förbättrats2014In: Socionomen, ISSN 0283-1929, no 7, p. 38-53Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Atroshi, Isam
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lyrén, Per-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Educational Measurement.
    Gummesson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    The 6-item CTS symptoms scale: a brief outcomes measure for carpal tunnel syndrome2009In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 347-358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Axelsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kihlberg, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Davis, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Department of Health, Education and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Psychotherapy students' experiences of supervisee-centred supervision based on deliberate practice, feedback-informed treatment and self-compassion2023In: Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1473-3145, E-ISSN 1746-1405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are few methods that focus on therapists' experiences of supervision. To facilitate the development of psychologist students, a supervisee-centred supervision, based on deliberate practice, feedback informed treatment and self-compassion, was introduced.

    Methods: This study examines six supervisees’ experiences of a supervisee-centred supervision. A semi- structured interview was used for the collection of the data, which identified two main themes: Learning and Development and five associated sub-themes: structure and purposesfulness, prerequisites, experience-based learning, therapeutic skills and personal development.

    Conclusion: The experience- and feedback-based approach was perceived as efficient, structured and goal oriented. This created high-focused activity and participation, a strong group dynamic and a good alliance with the supervisors, providing a good climate for learning and development. Focusing on performance and feedback was perceived as a potential obstacle that could create stress and anxiety.

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  • 15. Bakhiet, Salaheldin Farah Attallah
    et al.
    Dutton, Edward
    Ashaer, Khalil Yousif Ali
    Essa, Yossry Ahmed Sayed
    Blahmar, Tahani Abdulrahman Muhammad
    Hakami, Sultan Mohammed
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Understanding the Simber Effect: why is the age-dependent increase in children's cognitive ability smaller in Arab countries than in Britain?2018In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 122, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research indicates that the typical increase in IQ during childhood is greater in European countries than in Arab countries. A systematic literature review of age-dependent IQ in Arab countries is conducted, yielding relevant studies for 12 countries that fulfil the inclusion criteria. In almost all of these studies, Arab children exhibit an age-dependent IQ decline relative to Caucasian children, from 5 to about 12 years of age in particular. We term this phenomenon the Simber Effect. We propose two non-exclusive explanations. (1) The Flynn Effect is less intense in Arab countries because of localised differences, including poorer education quality and greater religiosity. (2) Those from Arab countries follow a faster Life History Strategy than Europeans, for environmental and possibly genetic reasons. Either way, the Simber Effect may amount to a Wilson Effect, meaning that the impact of genetic IQ increases with age.

  • 16. Ballesteros, S.
    et al.
    Toril, P.
    Mayas, J.
    Reales, J.M.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Role of a New ICT Home Environment in Healthy Ageing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this longitudinal study was to prevent and/or delay cognitive decline, and help maintain the independence and wellbeing of elders by using a web-based social network platform, enhanced with devices to detect users´ states and collect activity data. The idea is that an active lifestyle rich in social interactions, active engagement and mental training with videogames may mitigate age-related decline and reduce healthcare costs. The innovative applications and the videogame training approach developed in the study could have wide application for a large number of European older adults living alone. The effectiveness of the ICT solution is being assessed throughout the project with user and control groups in Spain, Sweden and Greece. User interviews, extensive psychological testing and on-going cognitive and fMRI experiments are being conducted.. The results have shown so far that the users improved in cognitive performance compared to controls on the MMSE. Well-being assessed with the SPF-IL Scale also showed an improvement in the Status dimension of the users. This dimension assesses the feeling of being independent, self-realization and achievement. Exploring new ways to maintain the cognitive and functional state of older users is today a critical issue, for individuals, for families, and for whole societies. The study has shown the positive potential of new interactive technologies to maintain mental health and independent living in the elderly. Computer technology and cognitive training can increase social integration and provide mental stimulation for older adults living alone.

  • 17.
    Bengtsson, Dennis
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Kristian IV:s väg 3, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Norway.
    Nygren, Jens
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Kristian IV:s väg 3, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Kristian IV:s väg 3, Halmstad, Sweden; Danish Centre of Motivation and Behaviour Science (DRIVEN), Department of Sports Sciences and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Kristian IV:s väg 3, Halmstad, Sweden.
    The effects of interpersonal development programmes with sport coaches and parents on youth athlete outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis2024In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 70, article id 102558Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpersonal coach-and parent development programmes (CDP and PDP, respectively), have the goal to foster positive youth sport experiences through high-quality relations between coaches, parents, and youth athletes. In this paper we systematically reviewed the extant literature and estimate the overall magnitude of such programmes and how they can inform future interventions. Specifically, we aimed to: (a) conduct a systematic review on the literature of interpersonal CDPs and PDPs within the youth sport context; (b) examine the effects of such interventions on youth athlete outcomes via a meta-analysis. English written peer-reviewed publications and grey literature was identified through electronic search in databases and manual searches of reference lists. By utilising a priori criteria for inclusion and exclusion, 33 studies describing interpersonal CDPs, and PDPs were identified in the systematic review. Studies that presented required data for estimation of Hedge's g effect sizes were included in the meta-analysis (k = 27). By and large, the included studies used a quasi-experimental design (58%), sampled from team sports (79%), and reported several delivery methods (e.g., workshops, audio feedback, observations, peer group discussions) and outcome measures (e.g., anxiety, autonomous motivation, self-confidence). Some interventions were based on the same delivery protocols (e.g., Coach Effectiveness Training, Mastery Approach to Coaching) or theoretical frameworks (e.g., Achievement Goal Theory, Self-Determination Theory). The meta-analysis showed statistically significant small, and medium, effect sizes on a subsample of youth athlete outcomes (e.g., task-related climate, fun and enjoyment, anxiety), indicating that coach interpersonal skills can contribute to positive youth sport experiences. Theory-based interpersonal CDPs and PDPs are recommended to expand the knowledge in this field of research.

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  • 18.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Remote neuropsychological assessment of patients with neurological disorders and injuries: a study protocol for a cross-sectional case-control validation study2024In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e080628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There are great potential benefits of being able to conduct neuropsychological assessments remotely, especially for hard-to-reach or less mobile patient groups. Such tools need to be equivalent to standard tests done in the clinic and also easy to use in a variety of clinical populations.

    Methods and analysis: This study protocol describes a cross-sectional study aimed at validating the newly developed digitalized neuropsychological test battery Mindmore Remote in patients with neurological disorders and injuries. Diagnoses comprise traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, brain tumour and epilepsy. 50 patients in each patient group will be included. In addition, 50 healthy controls will be recruited. All participants will undergo both testing with Mindmore Remote at home and traditional neuropsychological assessment face-to-face in a randomised order. The primary outcome is the association between tests from the Mindmore Remote battery and their equivalent traditional neuropsychological tests. Further, bias between methods and differences between groups will also be investigated.

    Ethics and dissemination: The study protocol has been approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (2022-06230-01) and adheres to the declaration of Helsinki. All participants will be given oral and written information about the study and sign informed consent forms before entering the study. All participants are informed that they can terminate their participation in the study at any given time, without giving any explanation, and participating in the study or not will not affect their care at the clinic. Neither authors nor personnel involved in the research project are affiliated with Mindmore AB. The results from the study will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and presented at national and international conferences on the topic.

    Trial registration number: NCT05819008.

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  • 19.
    Bergström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    The conjunction of non-consciously perceived object identity and spatial position can be retained during a visual short-term memory task2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although non-consciously perceived information has previously been assumed to be short-lived (<500 ms), recent findings show that non-consciously perceived information can be maintained for at least 15s Such findings can be explained as working memory without a conscious experience of the information to be retained. However, whether or not working memory can operate on non-consciously perceived information remains controversial, and little is known about the nature of such non-conscious visual short-term memory (VSTM). Here we used continuous flash suppression to render stimuli non-conscious, to investigate the properties of non-consciously perceived representations in delayed match-to-sample (DMS) tasks. In Experiment I we used variable delays (5 or 15s) and found that performance was significantly better than chance and was unaffected by delay duration, thereby replicating previous findings. In Experiment II the DMS task required participants to combine information of spatial position and object identity on a trial-by-trial basis to successfully solve the task. We found that the conjunction of spatial position and object identity was retained, thereby verifying that non-conscious, trial-specific information can be maintained for prospective use. We conclude that our results are consistent with a working memory interpretation, but that more research is needed to verify this interpretation.

  • 20.
    Boettcher, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden and Free Univ Berlin, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Åström, Viktor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Påhlsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schenstrom, Ola
    Mindfulness Ctr, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Mindfulness Treatment for Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial2014In: Behavior Therapy, ISSN 0005-7894, E-ISSN 1878-1888, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 241-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mindfulness-based interventions have proven effective for the trans diagnostic treatment of heterogeneous anxiety disorders. So far, no study has investigated the potential of mindfulness-based treatments when delivered remotely via the Internet. The current trial aims at evaluating the efficacy of a stand-alone, unguided, Internet-based mindfulness treatment program for anxiety. Ninety-one participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified were randomly assigned to a mindfulness treatment group (MTG) or to an online discussion forum control group (CG). Mindfulness treatment consisted of 96 audio files with instructions for various mindfulness meditation exercises. Primary and secondary outcome measures were assessed at pre-, post-treatment, and at 6-months follow-up. Participants of the MTG showed a larger decrease of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia from pre- to postassessment than participants of the CG (Cohen's d(between) = 0.36-0.99). Within effect sizes were large in the MTG (d = 0.82-1.58) and small to moderate in the CG (d = 0.45-0.76). In contrast to participants of the CG, participants of the MTG also achieved a moderate improvement in their quality of life. The study provided encouraging results for an Internet-based mindfulness protocol in the treatment of primary anxiety disorders. Future replications of these results will show whether Web-based mindfulness meditation can constitute a valid alternative to existing, evidence-based cognitive-behavioural Internet treatments.

  • 21.
    Bornström, Villiam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    THE EFFECTS OF MINDFUL MEDITATION AND CYCLIC HYPERVENTILATION WITH RETENTION ON INTEROCEPTION IN HEALTHY ADULTS: A STUDY ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND INTEROCEPTIVE CAPACITY2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the comparative effects of mindful meditation and cyclic hyperventilation with retention upon interoceptive ability and heart rate variability (HRV). Further studies comparing meditation and breathwork contribute to a greater understanding of their potential benefits and have the potential to enhance overall well-being in the general population. A pre-post randomized controlled trial design was employed. Interoceptive accuracy was assessed through heartbeat detection task. Interoceptive sensibility was measured through confidence judgments, and interoceptive awareness by the correlation between accuracy and sensibility. Participants were randomly assigned to perform mindful meditation or cyclic hyperventilation with retention once per day for 21 consecutive days. No differences in interoceptive capacity and HRV was observed between the groups, but a tendency towards improved accuracy and increased confidence for both groups. However, the mindful meditation group exhibited a stronger positive association between HRV and interoceptive accuracy after the intervention, while the opposite was true for the cyclic hyperventilation group. Additionally, interoceptive awareness remained stable throughout the study. Mindful meditation demonstrated an enhancement in parasympathetic activity, as evidenced by higher RMSSD values. In contrast, cyclic hyperventilation with retention resulted in a substantial reduction in parasympathetic activity. This study highlights the complexity of interoception and emphasizes the need for further investigation in the context of mindfulness-based and breathwork interventions. 

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  • 22. Botha, C
    et al.
    Pienaar, Jaco
    South African correctional official occupational stress: The role of psychological strengths.2006In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Briones-Vozmediano, Erica
    et al.
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ortiz-Barreda, Gaby
    Gil-González, Diana
    Vives-Cases, Carmen
    Professionals' perceptions of support resources for battered immigrant women: chronicle of an anticipated failure2014In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1006-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the experience of service providers in Spain regarding their daily professional encounters with battered immigrant women and their perception of this group's help-seeking process and the eventual abandonment of the same. Twenty-nine in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 43 professionals involved in providing support to battered immigrant women. We interviewed social workers, psychologists, intercultural mediators, judges, lawyers, and public health professionals from Spain. Through qualitative content analysis, four categories emerged: (a) frustration with the victim's decision to abandon the help-seeking process, (b) ambivalent positions regarding differences between immigrant and Spanish women, (c) difficulties in the migratory process that may hinder the help-seeking process, and (d) criticisms regarding the inefficiency of existing resources. The four categories were cross-cut by an overarching theme: helping immigrant women not to abandon the help-seeking process as a chronicle of anticipated failure. The main reasons that emerged for abandoning the help-seeking process involved structural factors such as economic dependence, loss of social support after leaving their country of origin, and limited knowledge about available resources. The professionals perceived their encounters with battered immigrant women to be frustrating and unproductive because they felt that they had few resources to back them up. They felt that despite the existence of public policies targeting intimate partner violence (IPV) and immigration in Spain, the resources dedicated to tackling gender-based violence were insufficient to meet battered immigrant women's needs. Professionals should be trained both in the problem of IPV and in providing support to the immigrant population.

  • 24. Brändström, Sven
    et al.
    Sigvardsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Nylander, Per-Olof
    Richter, Jörg
    The Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)2008In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 14-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to establish new norms of the Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), data from 2,209 Swedish individuals (age between 13 and 80) was analyzed. The second aim was to evaluate the impact of age and gender on the questionnaire scores. The third aim was to investigate whether the TO can be meaningfully applied to adolescents in personality assessment as a basis for further research and clinical studies. Age and gender showed independent effects on personality dimensions, which implies that age and gender specific norms have to be established for the TCI. Furthermore, the results in terms of inconsistencies in the correlational and factorial structure, as well as low internal consistency scores in the younger age groups, suggest that the adult version of the TCI should not be applied below the age of 17; for these age groups we recommend the use of the junior TCI (JTCI). The inventory is under further development and several items are in need of revision in order to create less complicated formulations, enabling an improvement in the psychometrics.

  • 25.
    Brügger, Annina
    et al.
    Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Richter, Kai-Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Fabrikant, Sara Irina
    Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Distributing Attention Between Environment and Navigation System to Increase Spatial Knowledge Acquisition During Assisted Wayfinding2018In: Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017) / [ed] Fogliaroni P., Ballatore A., Clementini E., Springer, 2018, p. 19-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Travelers happily follow the route instructions of their devices when navigating in an unknown environment. Navigation systems focus on route instructions to allow the user to efficiently reach a destination, but their increased use also has negative consequences. We argue that the limitation for spatial knowledge acquisition is grounded in the system’s design, primarily aimed at increasing navigation efficiency. Therefore, we empirically investigate how navigation systems could guide users’ attention to support spatial knowledge acquisition during efficient route following tasks.

  • 26.
    Brügger, Annina
    et al.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Richter, Kai-Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Fabrikant, Sara Irina
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    How does navigation system behavior influence human behavior?2019In: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, E-ISSN 2365-7464, Vol. 4, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Navigation systems are ubiquitous tools to assist wayfinders of the mobile information society with various navigational tasks. Whenever such systems assist with self-localization and path planning, they reduce human effort for navigating. Automated navigation assistance benefits navigation performance, but research seems to show that it negatively affects attention to environment properties, spatial knowledge acquisition, and retention of spatial information. Very little is known about how to design navigation systems for pedestrian navigation that increase both navigation performance and spatial knowledge acquisition. To this end, we empirically tested participants (N = 64) using four different navigation system behaviors (between-subject design). Two cognitive processes with varying levels of automation, self-localization and allocation of attention, define navigation system behaviors: either the system automatically executes one of the processes (high level of automation), or the system leaves the decision of when and where to execute the process to the navigator (low level of automation). In two experimental phases, we applied a novel empirical framework for evaluating spatial knowledge acquisition in a real-world outdoor urban environment. First, participants followed a route assisted by a navigation system and, simultaneously, incidentally acquired spatial knowledge. Second, participants reversed the route using the spatial knowledge acquired during the assisted phase, this time without the aid of the navigation system. Results of the route-following phase did not reveal differences in navigation performance across groups using different navigation system behaviors. However, participants using systems with higher levels of automation seemed not to acquire enough spatial knowledge to reverse the route without navigation errors. Furthermore, employing novel methods to analyze mobile eye tracking data revealed distinct patterns of human gaze behavior over time and space. We thus can demonstrate how to increase spatial knowledge acquisition without harming navigation performance when using navigation systems, and how to influence human navigation behavior with varying navigation system behavior. Thus, we provide key findings for the design of intelligent automated navigation systems in real-world scenarios.

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  • 27.
    Bubna, Kabir
    et al.
    The International Federation of Esports Coaches (IFoEC), London, United Kingdom.
    Trotter, Michael Geoffrey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Watson, Matthew
    The International Federation of Esports Coaches (IFoEC), London, United Kingdom; Department of Performance Psychology, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Polman, Remco
    Institute of Health and Wellbeing, Federation University Australia, VIC, Berwick, Australia.
    Coaching and talent development in esports: a theoretical framework and suggestions for future research2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1191801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Esports is a growing phenomenon that is capturing the attention of individuals worldwide, and has grown to provide professional and lucrative careers for those who reach the upper echelons. One question that arises, is how esports athletes develop the necessary skills required to improve and compete. This perspective piece opens the door to skill acquisition within esports and how research through an ecological approach can benefit researchers and practitioners as they understand the various perception-action couplings and decision-making challenges faced by esports athletes. We will identify and discuss what constraints look like in esports, the role of affordances, and theorize the implementation of a constraints-led approach in contrasting esports genres. As esports is technology-heavy in nature and generally sedentary, the use of eye-tracking technology is argued to represent an effective method to better understand perceptual attunement between individuals and teams. Future research into skill acquisition in esports is needed to develop a clearer picture of what makes the greatest esports player so great, and how newer players can be developed effectively.

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  • 28.
    Bäckman, Lars
    et al.
    Aging Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Farde, Lars
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dopamine and cognitive aging: a strong relationship2006In: Progress in psychological science around the world. Volume 1 neural, cognitive and developmental issues: Proceedings of the 28th international congress of psychology / [ed] Qicheng Jing; Mark R. Rosenzweig; Gery d'Ydewalle; Houcan Zhang; Hsuan-Chih Chen; Kan Zhang, Psychology Press, 2006, p. 455-469Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29. Bååth, R.
    et al.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The subjective difficulty of tapping to a slow beat2012In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition and the 8th Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music: July 23-28, 2012, Thessaloniki, Greece / [ed] Cambouroploulos, E.; Tsougras, C.;Mavromatis, P; Pastiadis, K., 2012, p. 82-85Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Bååth, Rasmus
    et al.
    Strandberg, T.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Measuring the rhythmic properties of eye movements2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Börjesson, Marcus
    et al.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Davis, Paul A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Flotation REST as a Stress Reduction Method: The Effects on Anxiety, Muscle Tension, and Performance2018In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, E-ISSN 1932-927X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 333-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of flotation REST upon skilled and less skilled golfers' anxiety in terms of physiological indicators of stress, self-rated anxiety scores, muscle tension, and the effect on golf putting. Prior to performing the putting task participants underwent a treatment of flotation REST or a period of resting in an armchair. Participants completed both treatments in a randomized order with a two-week interval. The results showed that both flotation REST and the armchair treatment reduced systolic blood pressure and heart rate, with no differences between treatments or athlete skill levels. No significant differences between treatments were revealed regarding self-ratings, level of muscle tension or putting precision. The results indicate that flotation REST may be useful for reducing negative symptoms related to stress and anxiety in general; however, no support for direct positive effects on golf performance were found.

  • 32.
    Carelli, Maria Grazia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olsson, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Neural correlates of time perspective2015In: Time perspective theory: review, research and application: essays in honor of Philip G. Zimbardo / [ed] M. Stolarski, N. Fieulaine, van Beek, W., Berlin: Springer , 2015, p. 231-242Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this chapter is to summarize our present knowledge about the neural correlates of time perspective and related constructs. We first briefly introduce functional magnetic resonance functional magnetic resonance imaging as a suitable technique to understand the underlying neural mechanisms when studying various constructs of time. Then, we discuss how the use of brain imaging techniques has improved our knowledge regarding concepts of time perspective. In this section it becomes evident that most studies have focused on mental time traveling. Finally we introduce a novel line of research in which we try to study neural correlates of time within the context of the Zimbardo framework. By such approach we are able to include the personality-like construct from the ZTPI to further understand the neural correlates of temporal processing.

  • 33.
    Carlberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oresten, Hampus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    EFFEKTEN AV EN ENSTAKA MINDFULNESSÖVNING PÅ INHIBERING I ERIKSEN FLANKER TASK2021Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the connection between inhibition and a short mindfulness exercise on a sample of media-multitaskers, defined as a person using more than one media at the same time. The study was an internet-based experiment in which the partcipants were randomly assigned to a mindfulness condition (n = 18) or a control condition (n = 22) in which listened to classical music. Participants (20–60 years) were recruited through facebook, university and posters, the selection was a convenience sample. They had no former experience of mindfulness meditation and had no psychiatric diagnosis. The primary measure was the ability of inhibition measured with the Eriksen flanker task. Additional measures were state mindfulness and self-perceived stress. Both groups improved their inhibition-ability with no significant difference between groups. There was no additional difference in self-assessed mindfulnessstate between groups. Results indicate that the inhibition-ability does not depend on the level of self-assessed stress but this should in addition be interpreted with caution because of methodological shortcomings. As a focused attention (FA) mindfulness exercise to classical music didn’t significantly differ in mindfulness state future research should examinethe validity of the construct mindfulness.

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  • 34. Carlbring, P.
    et al.
    Hassmen, P.
    Nyström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindner, P.
    Andersson, G.
    The relative effects of behavioral activation vs. physical exercise in the treatment of mild to moderate depression2016In: ISRII 8th Scientific Meeting Technologies for a digital world: Improving health across the lifespan, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Nyström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Martell, Christopher
    Forsberg, L
    Ström, L
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Hassmen, Peter
    Behavioral activation vs physical exercise in the treatment of mild to moderate depression2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36. Carlsson, Jan
    et al.
    Ek, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Jacobsson, Peter
    Lundgren, Mats
    Att bedöma kognitiva psykoterapeuters kompetens, hur göra man?: Jämförelse av två skattningsskalor2008In: Sokraten Medlemstidning, no 1, p. 11-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet kompetens har visat sig vara svårfångat i kognitiv terapi (Kazantizis 2003). Ändå är det något som vi terapeuter försöker utveckla och uppnå. Ett specifikt försök, som författarna till denna artikel har antagit är "den korrekta och skickliga användningen av en empiriskt validerad modell av terapi på ett sådant sätt att de är sannolikt att resultera i en mera klinisk signifikant förändring för patienten" (James, Blackburn, Milne & Reichelt, 2001, förf. översättning). Flera studier tyder på att både erfarenhet, utbildningsnivå och expertskattad kompetens gör skillnad i behandlingsutfall. (DeRubeis, Hollon, Amsterdam mfl., 2005; Frank, Kupfer, Wgner mfl., 1991; Trepka, Rees, Shapiro mfl., 2004).

  • 37.
    Carr, Rachel Margaret
    et al.
    School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom; Physical Activity and Well-being Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Quested, Eleanor
    School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Physical Activity and Well-being Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
    School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Physical Activity and Well-being Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Prestwich, Andrew
    School of Psychology, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Gucciardi, Daniel Frank
    School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Physical Activity and Well-being Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    McVeigh, Joanne
    School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Physical Activity and Well-being Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Postnatal Exercise Partners Study (PEEPS): a pilot randomized trial of a dyadic physical activity intervention for postpartum mothers and a significant other2021In: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, E-ISSN 2164-2850, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 251-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research suggests dyadic interventions can increase physical activity; such interventions are untested within postpartum parent couples.

    Methods: A three-armed pilot randomized trial addressed this gap and tested which type of dyadic intervention is most effective. Inactive postpartum mothers and a significant other were recruited in Australia (n = 143 assessed for eligibility) and randomised in a single-blinded fashion (i.e. participants were blinded) to 1 of 3 dyadic conditions involving a single face-to-face session with access to web-based group support: a minimal treatment control (n = 34), collaborative planning group (n = 38), or collaborative planning + need supportive communication group (n = 30). Participants were asked to wear their accelerometers for 8 days and completed self-report measures at baseline, end of intervention (week 4), and follow-up (week 12). We expected dyads in the collaborative planning + need supportive communication group would have the greatest increases in Physical Activity (PA), autonomous motivation, and partners’ need supportive behaviours; and decreases in controlled motivation and controlling partner behaviours.

    Results: Results from 51 dyads using Bayesian actor-partner interdependence models provided some evidence for a small positive effect on total PA at follow-up for postpartum mothers in the collaborative planning group and for partners in the collaborative planning + need supportive communication group. Furthermore, partners in the collaborative planning + need supportive communication group were more likely to engage in some vigorous PA. At follow-up, postpartum mothers in the collaborative planning + need supportive communication group scored lower on personal autonomous reasons.

    Conclusions: The impact of prior specification mean intervention effects need to be interpreted with caution. Progression to a full trial is warranted.

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  • 38.
    Cederfjärd, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schroderus, Ramona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Allostas, interoception och emotionell granularitet i psykologisk behandling av emotionell problematik: –en litteraturstudie2022Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 60 credits / 90 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For research on emotions and emotion processing, it's an exciting time. More recent brain research has opened new possibilities for the understanding of the brain and emotions. A new theory in psychological constructionism, based on brain research, interdisciplinary studies and the shortcomings of the dominant affect theory, basic emotion, is the Theory of constructed emotion (TCE). There is no treatment model linked to TCE yet but based on its focus on describing how the brain works and emotions are created, it is still interesting to investigate whether its active mechanisms. This is a general literature study with the aim of examining the concepts; allostasis, interoception and emotional granularity in the context of mental illness and psychological treatment of emotional problems. The results show that allostasis, the body budget, is the foundation of our physical and mental well-being, interoception and brain predictions are important for our ability to understand our emotions and emotional granularity helps us construct fine-grained emotion concepts that help us choose the right action at the right time to the right emotion. Training interoception and emotional granularity helps us maintain mental health and is a good psychoeducative element in psychological treatment. More research is needed, primarily on how to apply the concepts in psychological treatment and in general to better integrate new emotion research with dominant theories for a common understanding of emotions and psychotherapy. 

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  • 39.
    Cedres, Nira
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Sensory Cognitive Interaction Laboratory (SCI-Lab), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Fernando Pessoa Canarias, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
    Aejmelaeus-Lindström, Andrea
    Department of Psychology, Sensory Cognitive Interaction Laboratory (SCI-Lab), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekström, Ingrid
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Li, Xin
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Jonas K.
    Department of Psychology, Sensory Cognitive Interaction Laboratory (SCI-Lab), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Subjective impairments in olfaction and cognition predict dissociated behavioral outcomes2023In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-rated subjective cognitive decline (SCD) and subjective olfactory impairment (SOI) are associated with objective cognitive decline and dementia. However, their relationship and co-occurrence is unknown. We aimed to (a) describe the occurrence of SOI, SCD and their overlap in the general population; (b) compare SOI and SCD in terms of longitudinal associations with corresponding objective olfactory and cognitive measures; and (c) describe how SOI and SCD may lead to distinct sensory and cognitive outcomes.

    Methods: Cognitively unimpaired individuals from the third wave of the Swedish population-based Betula study (n=784, aged 35-90 years; 51% females) were split into self-rated SOI, SCD, overlapping SCD+SOI, and controls. Between-subject and within-subject repeated-measures MANCOVA were used to compare the groups regarding odor identification, cognition, age, sex, and education. Spearman correlation was used to assess the different patterns of association between olfaction and cognition across groups.

    Results: SOI was present in 21.1%, whereas SCD was present in 9.9% of participants. According to a chi-square analysis, the SCD+SOI overlap (2.7%) is on a level that could be expected if the phenomena were independent. Odor identification in SOI showed decline at the 10-year follow-up (n=284) and was positively associated with cognition. The SOI and SCD groups showed distinct cognitive-olfactory profiles at follow-up.

    Conclusions: SOI occur independently of SCD in the population, and these risk factors are associated with different cognitive and olfactory outcomes. The biological causes underlying SOI and SCD, as well as the risk for future cognitive impairment, need further investigation.

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  • 40. Chan, Derwin
    et al.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Yang, Sophie
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos
    Hagger, Martin
    Response-Order Effects in Survey Methods: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Study in the Context of Sport Injury Prevention2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 666-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consistency tendency is characterized by the propensity for participants responding to subsequent items in asurvey consistent with their responses to previous items. This method effect might contaminate the results ofsport psychology surveys using cross-sectional design. We present a randomized controlled crossover studyexamining the effect of consistency tendency on the motivational pathway (i.e., autonomy support → autonomousmotivation → intention) of self-determination theory in the context of sport injury prevention. Athletesfrom Sweden (N = 341) responded to the survey printed in either low interitem distance (IID; consistencytendency likely) or high IID (consistency tendency suppressed) on two separate occasions, with a one-weekinterim period. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups, and they received the survey of differentIID at each occasion. Bayesian structural equation modeling showed that low IID condition had strongerparameter estimates than high IID condition, but the differences were not statistically significant.

  • 41. Chan, Derwin K. C.
    et al.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Yusainy, Cleoputri
    Hikmiah, Ziadatul
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Hagger, Martin S.
    Rhodes, Ryan E.
    Beauchamp, Mark R.
    Consistency tendency and the theory of planned behavior: a randomized controlled crossover trial in a physical activity context2020In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 665-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study examined the effects of consistency tendency on the predictive power of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in relation to physical activity behavior.

    Methods: In this randomized controlled cross-over trial, we recruited 770 undergraduate students from Indonesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. Participants completed physical activity versions of TPB measures at T1 (baseline) and T2 (post 1 week), and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire at T3 (post 1 month). At T1 and T2, the TPB questions were either presented in ensemble-order (i.e., consistency tendency supressed) or alternate-order (i.e., consistency tendency facilitated).

    Results: The parameter estimates of the model (CFI > .92, TLI > .90, SRMR < .08, RMSEA < .08) aligned with the tenets of TPB. As compared to ensemble-order, a TPB measured in alternate-order yielded stronger cross-sectional relationships, but this pattern did not appear in the prospective relationships in TPB (i.e., intention/perceived behavioral control and behavior).

    Conclusions: Consistency tendency inflated the factor correlations of cross-sectionally measured TPB variables, but the inflation was not observed in the prospective prediction of behavior. Health psychology questionnaires with items presented in ensemble order may represent a viable means of reducing the confounding effect of consistency tendency.

  • 42.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Symptoms from masked acrolein exposure suggest altered trigeminal reactivity in chemical intolerance2017In: Neurotoxicology, ISSN 0161-813X, E-ISSN 1872-9711, Vol. 60, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chemical intolerance (CI) is a widespread occupational and public health problem characterized by symptoms that reportedly result from low-levels of chemical exposure. The mechanisms behind CI are unknown, however modifications of the chemical senses (rather than toxic processes) have been suggested as key components. The aim of this study was to investigate whether individuals with self-reported CI report more sensory irritation during masked acrolein exposure compared to controls without CI. Methods: Individuals with CI (n = 18) and controls without CI (n = 19) were exposed in an exposure chamber. Each participant took part in two exposure conditions – one with heptane (the masking compound), and one with heptane and acrolein at a dose below previously reported sensory irritation thresholds. The exposures lasted for 60 min. Symptoms and confidence ratings were measured continuously throughout the exposure as were measurements of electrodermal activity and self-reported tear-film break-up time. Participants were blind to exposure condition. Results: Individuals with CI, compared with controls reported greater sensory irritation in the eyes, nose and throat when exposed to acrolein masked with heptane. There was no difference during exposure to heptane. Conclusions: Masked exposure to acrolein at a concentration below the previously reported detection threshold is perceived as more irritating by individuals with CI compared with controls. The results indicate that there is altered trigeminal reactivity in those with CI compared to controls.

  • 43.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Edvardsson, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Liljelind, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stress and sleep in relation to severity of building related symptoms2023In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 541-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates different aspects of stress and sleep in medically examined individuals with varying severity of building-related symptoms (BRS).

    METHODS: Three questionnaires were used to assess acute and long-term stress and sleep (Perceived Stress Scale; Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire, and Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire).

    RESULTS: Individuals with BRS, regardless of severity, did not differ in level of perceived stress (indicator of short-term stress). The indicators of long-term stress differed between the groups where an increased severity was associated with higher levels of burnout and sleep problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests an association between symptom severity and measures of long-term stress and sleep quality. This has implications for the treatment of persons affected by BRS, because not only the environment needs to be treated, but also the concurrent signs of distress, such as burnout or sleep problems.

  • 44. Coetzee, A
    et al.
    Linde, B
    Pienaar, Jaco
    The workplace antecedents of the intention to emigrate.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Dahl, Sofia
    et al.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Keeping the tempo and perceiving the beat2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46. Dahlin, Mats
    et al.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Magnusson, Kristoffer
    Johansson, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sjögren, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Håkansson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pettersson, Magnus
    Kadowaki, Asa
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Carlbring, Per
    Internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial2016In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 77, p. 86-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a disabling condition which can be treated with cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). The present study tested the effects of therapist-guided internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy on symptoms of GAD and quality of life. An audio CD with acceptance and mindfulness exercises and a separate workbook were also included in the treatment. Participants diagnosed with GAD (N = 103) were randomly allocated to immediate therapist-guided internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy or to a waiting-list control condition. A six month follow-up was also included. Results using hierarchical linear modelling showed moderate to large effects on symptoms of GAD (Cohen's d = 0.70 to 0.98), moderate effects on depressive symptoms (Cohen's d = 0.51 to 0.56), and no effect on quality of life. Follow-up data showed maintained effects. While there was a 20% dropout rate, sensitivity analyses showed that dropouts did not differ in their degree of change during treatment. To conclude, our study suggests that internet-delivered acceptance based behaviour therapy can be effective in reducing the symptoms of GAD.

  • 47.
    Davis, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brown, Daniel
    Arnold, Rachel
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Thriving Through Relationships in Sport: The Coach-Athlete Attachment Relationship2022In: Sport, exercise and performance psychology:challenges and opportunities in a changing world: Abstract book, European Federation of Sport Psychology , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Davis, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brown, Daniel J.
    School of Sport, Health and Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom.
    Arnold, Rachel
    Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Sport and Social Sciences, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Thriving Through Relationships in Sport: The Role of the Parent–Athlete and Coach–Athlete Attachment Relationship2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 694599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to examine whether attachment relationships to significant others, such as to parents and/or sports coaches, enable thriving and competition performance within sport. Two studies employing cross-sectional and prospective designs were carried out across different samples of athletes of varied skill levels and sports. In Study 1, we found athletes' attachment to their sports coach was significantly associated with athlete thriving and mediated by psychological needs satisfaction. Results of Study 2 found that athletes' secure attachment to their mother and/or father positively predicted the experience of thriving at the competition while athletes' insecure attachment did not predict thriving. Furthermore, athletes' attachment to both mother and father did not predict competition performance. Together, these two studies acknowledge the significant role that athletes' secure attachment relationships with parents and coaches play in facilitating thriving in athletes. These findings have significant implications for research and practice.

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  • 49.
    Davis, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wachsmuth, Svenja
    Jowett, Sophia
    Hajo, Kendal
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Norberg, Niklas
    Räisänen, Petteri
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Why can't we communicate?! Identifying the barriers of effective communication within the coach-athlete relationship2022In: Sport, exercise and performance psychology: challenges and opportunities in a changing world: Abstract book, European Federation of Sport Psychology , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Davis, Paul A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Davis, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wills, Samuel
    Appleby, Ralph
    Nieuwenhuys, Arnie
    Exploring "Sledging" and Interpersonal Emotion-Regulation Strategies in Professional Cricket2018In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines cricketers’ perceptions of emotional interactions between competitors. Semistructured interviews with 12 male professional cricketers explored experiences (i.e., emotions, cognitions, behaviors) relating to incidents during competition where they or an opponent attempted to evoke an emotional reaction (e.g., sledging). Cricketers described their use of sledging as aggressive actions and verbal interactions with the aim of disrupting concentration and altering the emotional states of opponents. They described experiencing a variety of emotions (e.g., anxiety, anger) in response to opponents’ attempts at interpersonal emotion regulation; linguistic analyses indicated that both positive than negative emotions were experienced. A range of strategies in response to competitors’ deliberate attempts at interpersonal emotion regulation were outlined. The present study extends previous research investigating interpersonal emotion regulation within teams by indicating that professional cricketers are aware of the impact of cognitions and emotions on performance and attempt to negatively influence these factors in competitors

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