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  • 1. Aaro, Fredrik
    The Joy of Riding2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    2045 a progressive European city is banning driving and BMW has to respond. Technological evolution, and a culture used to new interfaces leads to the option to recreate the relationship between human and car. But how to interact with our new friends?

    Talking to experts in the fields of science fiction, environmentalism, horse riding and piloting helped in first constructing a future and then tailoring an interface-vision for its inhabitants and their autonomous cars.

    The result is a tactile bond connecting driver and machine. Working together with your car doesn't have to mean loosing control, it's just another quality of control.

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  • 2.
    Abdipour, Morteza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Arrangement Design Studies: the introduction of the digital wall in domestic environments2021Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research focuses on the emergence of 'digital walls' that can project images onto almost all or even the entirety of interior (and perhaps exterior) walls, and what implications this might have for how we arrange our rooms. It demonstrates the arrangement, i.e., the way that domestic products are arranged physically, of rooms changes in the domestic environment in a complex scenario when using large screens. Due to the fast-growing demand for large screens, this product could potentially be available to be used by people in their home environments; however, it does not yet exist in reality at this scale. Constructing large screens can be carried out using different production methods. Here, this concept is called the digital wall, a very thin wall-sized interactive screen. The characteristics of the digital wall will vary to be able to create different scenarios. One such scenario is a space in the home where the surface of the wall is covered with screens, which allows multiple possibilities to experience and interact with digital content. 

    In this research, the social gathering space of homes, nowadays called the living room, is considered as a highly relevant space for installing the digital wall. In this space, the conceptual framework outlines the basic elements of the research and demonstrates the relationships between people’s interactions with the digital wall and domestic products in the domestic environment. I show two examples from design history to understand how arrangement changes impact the home environment: the transformation of the parlor to the living room, and entry of the television into the living room. These two examples are focused on the place in the home where people gather for socializing. The discussion of these examples led to the elaboration of the relationships between the elements in the conceptual framework.

    I explored relevant design research methodologies to bring this future scenario into the present to understand the relationships between people and the digital wall. I applied research through design and the constructive design research approaches to frame the design research methodology. In this thesis, I set up seven series of design studies in two cluster groups: Supportive studies and Main studies. All of the design studies were conducted in the Design Research Lab, the actual space for carrying out the design experiments, prototyping the digital wall, and the setting of the experiments for user participation. The Lab was fully equipped with relevant technology and allowed me to use multiple methods to collect data while people were experiencing the design study sessions. The Lab was useful as a platform to understand user experiences, barriers for interactions as well as people's experiences in a simulated space of a domestic environment. 

    The main contribution of this research is to understand the forms of arrangement changes when people use the digital wall in homes. The research demonstrates two significant implications that are seen in two forms of arrangements: tangible arrangement and imperceptible arrangement. These findings are useful for both designers and users of the elements of domestic contexts and the relations that can be shaped by the presence of a digital wall in home environments. This understanding may provide design guidelines in future scenarios in which the digital wall is used in homes. The findings are also beneficial for designing the domestic environment, improving the arrangement of space, and raising the requirements for designing domestic products.

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  • 3.
    Abdipour, Morteza
    Department of Design, Mid Sweden University.
    User Participatory Design Evaluation and Education through Design Lab2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the possibilities of a design lab that can be used in evaluation processes for different design subjects in design education. Three student projects from different domains are studied to explore how utilizing a design lab for user involvement can affect the design process. The Design Lab is situated at Mid Sweden University and can project images, video and online materials on three walls and provide sound. Different tools to collect data are available, such as video cameras, equipment for psychophysical measurement and software for analysis. The studies show that design students can use the lab to prototype different scenarios or environments as well as to display large subjects at an appropriate scale. The study found that the Design Lab offers possibilities to involve diverse groups of users, such as people with disabilities, the elderly and even dogs, which gave the students the possibility to obtain feedback from the specific users that could provide the most valuable input.

  • 4.
    Abdipour, Morteza
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University.
    Lorentzen, Lena
    Olin, Håkan
    A Design Research Lab—An Integrated Model to Identify Conscious and Unconscious Behavior in the Design Process2016In: Advances in Design for Inclusion: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Design for Inclusion, July 27-31, 2016, Springer, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand how different design solutions affect users, designers traditionally use different evaluation methods that mainly rely on conscious feedback from the users. However, the complexity of human behaviour, where a large part is unconscious, point to a need for an extended tool box addressing the part not accessible to human conscious knowledge. Here, we describe a design research lab where traditional methods are complemented with tools to measure physiological signals influenced by emotional and sympathetic responses. These tools include galvanic skin response (GSR), electrocardiograph (ECG), and electroencephalograph (EEG). Typical sessions with acquired data of conscious and unconscious user reactions are described. The large body of data collected, which also require non-design expertise for interpretation, suggest that a further development towards simplified output data of the unconscious reactions is needed to allow wider use within industrial design work.

  • 5.
    Abele, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Acculan System: The next generation of a Surgical Power Tool2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Orthopedic surgery is dangerous, especially for the surgeon! Tool failures belong to the ten most frequent causes of operation delays. Nowadays, hospitals are pressured to optimize procedures and lower costs. Especially, orthopedic surgery is physically demanding for the ergonomics of the surgeon and tools wear out more quickly.

    Could the evolution of a surgical power tool be used in these scenarios to ease and support the surgeons work, increase the efficiency and flexibility of usage and at the same time offer more control and knowledge about the condition of the tools?

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    Surgical Power Tool
  • 6.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Composing the Umeå pantry: a platform for dialogue on food production and human survival2015In: Participatory Innovation Conference, PIN-C / [ed] Rianne Valkenburg, Coen Dekkers, Janneke Sluijs, The Hague, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 83-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Umeå Pantry was a five-week long public art event held in Umeå, Sweden, aimed at making concerns about food production public and supporting local communities interested in food related practices.

    The event consisted of a series of performances where participant communities were invited to a dialogue on food concerns and practices in the region. The performances took the form of communal activities such as food harvesting, cooking, workshops, debates and demonstrations.

    The making of the art event highlights the practice of creating forms for engagement and participation of disparate communities around social issues.

    In the broader picture, this project contributes to the understanding of community participatory design and design for social innovation.

  • 7.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Open-collaborative libraries: Libraries as generative community centres2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Prototyping boundary objects: Boundary objects as means for negotiating a cultural imaginary2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Ability To Make A Difference In Participatory Design Projects2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The case study presented here is an intensive nine day community participation project in a Swiss town, aimed at fostering community food production. The approach to participatory design presented here seeks to emphasize the in-situ improvisatory ‘doing' of collaborative activities.

    Using notions such as diffusing, reifying and catalyzing the study describes the iterative movement of the project that is bound up in material arrangements and social relations.

    Through a reflection in action approach, the author unpacks how the designer's agency is understood through social interactions and acts of summarizing, materialization and translation.

    The paper concludes by discussing power and agency, both as an outcome and central to the design process. This reflective exploration through the lens of agency seeks to encourage the reflexivity of designers in collaborative practice.

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  • 10.
    Aggarwal, Akansha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    DONOR SPACE: Bringing everyone together to support volunteer donors in Blood stem cell donation process2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globally in the medical and healthcare field, due to technological advancement and higher success rate of life-saving procedures, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of blood stem cell transplants performed each year. Consequently, the demand for blood stem cells from the donors is continual. The process of acquiring these cells from donors has its obstacles. Once volunteers are willing to donate and are identified as a potential match to the patient, they go through various stages, involving a long waiting period for the donors. 

    The aim of the project  is to apply and combine interaction design practices in the healthcare and medical world: how it would affect and shape specific experiences for the blood stem-cell donor. I would propose a digital service design that provides strategies to enhance the donation journey experience for the volunteer donors and the stakeholders involved in the process.

    The thesis project explores how we might design alternative ways to enhance a donor experience through digital services. 

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  • 11.
    Akoglu, Canan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The relationship between industrial design and interaction design in product development activities2012In: Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) International Conference, Austin, TX, USA, May 5-10, 2012 (on DVD), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Akoglu, Canan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Er, Alpay
    Istanbul Technical University.
    The role of interaction design in information and communication technologies embedded product development activities2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Akoglu, Canan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Valtonen, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Yours or mine?: Role sharing between industrial design and interaction design2012In: Design Research Society (DRS) International Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, July 1-5, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Al Khamissi, Saif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Velaria: Investigating the Value of Shared Vehicles in Future Megacities2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master of Fine Arts (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Solving future problems is a part of the masterprogram of transportation design, where thepossibilities and the push are to tackle socialand environmental problems. In this thesis, thedesigner was keen to investigate the value ofshared vehicles in future megacities since thesedense urban areas will face more challenges thantoday with the increased demands in housing,education, health, leisure and transportation.In order to investigate the future problems thatmegacities will face, the designer focuses ona speculative design approach that is used tohelp navigate the scenarios and determine themost applicable one, enabling him to determinethe values of a shared vehicle. The speculativefuture suggested a formation of segregated sub-societies within the city where individuals areforced to share certain mobility services. However,this segregation will have a reverse effect onhow the mobility behaviour of individuals mightchange in avoiding certain mobility services dueto its association with a sub-society other thanthe one they belong to, for example, people withdifferent ethnicity or social classes.Since mobility systems and vehicles areconsidered facilitators of such segregation andsub-societies formation, the solution can beprovided as a shared mobility vehicle. Such avehicle will form a focal interaction between twostrangers sharing the same route. Using ancientarchitectural techniques (the velarium andoculus), the vehicle creates a humble gatheringexperience that crosses economic, social andethnic differences.To achieve such a design, the designer useddifferent techniques in 2D design and 3Dmodelling to push for multiple directions that led to the formation of one concept, Velaria. TheVelaria is an autonomous oval-shaped vehiclewhere the rounded form, the velarium and theoculus at the roof provide an experience ofhumbleness and gathering by introducing thesky and the light as a higher umbrella or domethat brings users from different backgroundstogether. This technique was used in romanbuildings like the Pantheon and the Colosseum,and carried on to modern art and architecture.This project provides a glimpse of the implicationsof current mobility systems regarding theformation of social sustainability. Thereforethe project gives a clear direction of what thefuture values of the vehicle can be and how thevehicle can be the starting point of weaving thesocial fabric to achieve a resilient society thatcan change the future scenario of mobility andsociety in future megacities.

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  • 15.
    Aleksejeva, Jekaterina
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Biedermann, Paul Robert
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Gavriliuc, Iulia
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Orloiteva, Ona
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Wilde, Danielle
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Crafting Bioplastics: Materially reconfiguring everyday food practices2019In: Proceedings of the 4th biennial research through design conference: 19-22/03/2019, 2019, article id 23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First proclaimed an amazing innovation, now plastic permeates everything—our homes, food, earth, oceans, many living creatures, including ourselves. The use of plastic is problematic, but hard to change. It is culturally situated, commercially embedded, learned, ingrained, often automatic. And, while alternatives are available, they can be hard to find and more expensive than their plastic counterparts. To engage with this issue, we undertook a design-based investigation of DIY bioplastic, edible and hyper-compostable tableware. Our aim was to render such alternatives more accessible. DIY recipes are available online.

    Yet, often lack vital information to make their use easy. We discovered how to ‘tame’ fabrication of plastic alternatives by adding information about cooking and curing to the recipes. Our experiments suggest that ‘at home’ production of bioplastics and the accompanying re-design of cut- lery and tableware, engender new, more sustainable, eating habits by - literally - designing new ways of eating. They also afford reframing of food ‘waste’ into material resource. We present a hand-made book and material sample set that make our findings tangible and accessible to design researchers, amateur gastronomists, DIY enthusiasts, and others curious about plastic alternatives. Our findings support a move of scientific practices from the lab to people’s homes. 

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  • 16.
    Alessandrini, Andrea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    How an undergraduate group of design students solved wiring errors during the prototyping of an interactive artifact2022In: ECCE '22: proceedings of the 33rd European conference on cognitive ergonomics / [ed] Achim Ebert; Thomas Lachmann; Klaus Dreßler; Jessica Lindblom; René Reinhard, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, article id 12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of maker technology and personal fabrication has radically changed how we learn, design, and innovate. In recent years, a growing number of people have begun using a broad range of creative technologies. A common challenge with using these technologies is the difficulties during electronic circuit prototyping, particularly for end-users. This research investigates the causes of wiring problems and the troubleshooting strategies used during the prototyping of electronic circuits by nonexpert users. We conducted an ethnographic study of students at a university design school engaged in prototyping electronic circuits with creative technologies. We performed a microanalysis of the students' interactions and dialogues according to the distributed cognition framework. Results show the significance of having meaningful information on the prototyping tool in addition to the importance of the students sharing common ground so that they can effectively detect and solve wiring errors. Our conclusions highlight some relations between types of wiring errors and solution strategies.

  • 17.
    Aliasgari, Mahdis
    et al.
    Lighting Design Collective, Madrid, Spain.
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE Interactive, Kista, Sweden.
    Baby steps or stage dive into a critical design dialogue2017In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 32, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper puts forward the early, practical actions “in context” that can begin to sensitize, orient, expand, and constrain design dialogue at the outset of a design effort. Drawing on a case of “breaching experiments” in “non-places” we explore a “first approximation” of interventionist participation into the context of future interactive & responsive design interventions. By introducing a design journey, we have shed a light on how a human-centric approach, applied to the context of Human Building Interaction (HBI), can support an interventionist design dialogue between people and designed environment through processes of stirring up what’s beyond ‘norms’ of interaction.  

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  • 18.
    Almeida, Teresa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    (e)Textile new materialities2021In: Journal of Textile Design Research and Practice, ISSN 2051-1787, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the intersections within bodily materialism and future textiles by inquiring into embodied practices and materiality in care. By plac- ing the body as a site of research, it centres around con- cepts of bodily care and the body as an ecosystem, one that is always in flux and considers the fluidity of bodies and bodily fluids, such as urine, discharge, breath and sweat, as fluids with potential to design with. It looks at how bodies are acted upon by outside forces, and explore more-than-human relations as co-creators in co- habiting the space of the body and that around it. To illustrate this, the paper introduces a series of design research artefacts that take a variety of approaches to exploring the materiality of care in the everyday. First, an eTextile toolkit that aims to create bodily awareness through hands-on engagement with textile crafting tech- nology, then a biotextile harvesting toolkit that involves the raw material of the intimate body that explores DIYbio in the context of the home, and lastly a set of wearable living material-based explorations that recog- nize biomimicry and symbiotic relationships in designing for chronic stress. In embracing notions of bodily materi- alism, this paper explores the bodily abject, i.e. fluids and the more-than-human as crucial to engendering new modes of knowing in intimate and personal care through textile-based materials. The paper engages critically with textile design research and practice by placing material that embraces care as ambivalent at the forefront and thus challeng- ing traditional approaches to health and care and, importantly, the design of future textiles. 

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  • 19.
    Alpay, Aylin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Untangling Road Trip Experiences with Conected Car: Planning and bringing it to the car2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With developing technologies and growing infrastructures, connected experiences are expanding their realms towards various devices and scenarios in our lives. One of the areas, which is going under a big change due to this connectivity is the car related experiences. As connectivity is intrinsically enabler of different experiences and services, it is foreseen that it will bring a different dimension to car and driving related experiences as well.By investigating the future trends and possibilities that connectivity can provide to car and driving related experiences, this thesis aims for imagining the near future scenarios with an explorative approach, focusing on one and addressing to the rising issues with a design proposal that is meaningful to both users and the industry.The result, Tripcloud, contributes to the future scenario of having a road trip with the car, with a new digital platform that aims for supporting the users throughout the planning and bringing the plans into the car experience seamlessly and safely. It aims for reducing today’s existing complexity in terms of interaction and cognition to provide a better experience and avoid driver distraction. With providing organised information pieces, information exchange between people and automated links with mobile devices and car, Tripcloud offers easier an more convenient alternative for road trip planing and bringing the plans into car experiences for the near future.

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  • 20.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    et al.
    University of California Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Duval, Jared
    University of California Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    University Carlos III Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chisik, Yoram
    Independent Researcher, Haifa, Israel.
    Juanet Casulleras, Marina
    Freelance Illustrator, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Garcia Pañella, Oscar
    University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Wilde, Danielle
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Chasing play potentials in food culture: Learning from traditions to inspire future human-food interaction design2020In: DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 979-991Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this pictorial, we turn to culture and traditions to present an annotated portfolio of play-food potentials, i.e. interesting design qualities and/or interaction mechanisms that could help promote playful and social engagement in food practices. Our portfolio emerged from a one-day workshop where we played with and analyzed a collection of 27 food traditions from diverse cultural backgrounds and historical periods. We highlight play forms and experiential textures that are underexplored in Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research. Our contribution is intended to inspire designers to broaden the palette of play experiences and emotions embraced in HFI.

  • 21.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    et al.
    University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Jhaveri, Samvid
    University of California Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Lutz, Rosa
    University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Wilde, Danielle
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Visualising the landscape of Human-Food Interaction research2018In: DIS '18 Companion: Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, New York, 2018, p. 243-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While conducting a review of food-related technology research, we discovered that activity in this area is skyrocketing across a broad range of disciplinary interests and concerns. The dynamic and heterogeneous nature of the research presents a challenge to scholars wishing to critically engage with prior work, identify gaps and ensure impact. In response to this challenge, we are developing an online visualisation tool: an app that affords diffractive reading of the literature, mapping interferences and differences from varied perspectives. We present our first iteration of the app, which enables scholars to navigate the literature through seven lenses-focus, agency, domain, date of publication, author keywords, and publication venue and type. Here we present the first iteration of the app, toward receiving critical input from concerned researchers, to validate our approach and ensure relevance moving forward.

  • 22.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Wilde, Danielle
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Playing with food: reconfiguring the gastronomic experience through play2018In: Experiencing Food, Designing Dialogues: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Food Design and Food Studies (EFOOD 2017), October 19-21, 2017, Lisbon, Portugal / [ed] Ricardo Bonacho; Alcinda Pinheiro de Sousa; Cláudia Viegas; João Paulo Martins; Maria José Pires; Sara Velez Estêvão, CRC Press, 2018, , p. 4p. 3-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that play is an influential factor in the eating experience. Yet, playing with food remains a common taboo. We explore ways that eating and play might unfold in gastronomic restaurants. We review current practices and conduct mixed-method interviews with a range of stakeholders, using the PLEX framework for playful interactions to identify limitations of current approaches, as well as opportunities to take the convergence of gastronomy and play further. Our findings point to four design opportunities to extend playfulness in gastronomy: (1) eliciting play beyond surprise and make-believe; (2) facilitating socialization through emergent forms of play; (3) using common eating rituals as inspirationfor gastronomy; and (4) using play to enhance degustation. Our contribution extends understanding of the potential of playful gastronomy for chefs and restauranteurs, by positing new experiences for diners.

  • 23.
    An, Qingfan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Gebart-Hedman, Karin
    Västerbotten county council, Sweden.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Democratising eHealth design: empowering healthcare providers with healthcare design abilities through a co-creation training2023In: DS 123: proceedings of the international conference on engineering and product design education (E&PDE 2023) / [ed] Lyndon Buck; Hilary Grierson; Erik Bohemia, The Design Society, 2023, p. 235-240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The market penetration of eHealth interventions is substantially lower than investors anticipated due to their low acceptance. Main causes include the use of top-down approaches and the tendency for research to concentrate on technology rather than service delivery from users’ perspective. Healthcare professionals have exclusive expert knowledge of evidence-based practice in a specific area, which may explain why many eHealth intervention development projects continue to use top-down approaches. It is therefore crucial to empower healthcare professionals with design skills and mindset. On the otherhand, the roles and responsibilities of designers in the twenty-first century have been controversial. Many farsighted designers assert that we are at a turning point of transforming design from an expert driven process focused on objects and services within a taken-for-granted social and economic order towards design practices that advocates design-led societal transition toward more sustainable futures. To foster the transformation, design education should cater to all abilities. Health CASCADE is a MarieSklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network to consolidate co-creation as an effective tool to fight public health problems. Imparting the knowledge of co-creation in public health to healthcare professionals has the potential to alleviate the gap between design and healthcare, meanwhile provides opportunities for stakeholder participation in the development process to increase trust. This paper illustrates a curriculum development process partnered with a healthcare professional aiming for delivering knowledge of co-creation in public health to healthcare professionals working on designing eHealth programmes on the national healthcare support platform, 1177.se – Support and Treatment in Sweden. 

  • 24. Anderer, Markus
    Peking to Paris: The Evolution of Rally Motorsport2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this modern age, interest in cars is waning and motorsport faces its biggest threat yet. Television numbers are down and its fan base is aging, leading us to wonder: Is there a way to bring back the excitement about motorsport and cars in general? Throughout history, numerous innovations have trickled down from the race track to production cars, thus there is a need to keep this culture alive. Especially in the new era of autonomous driving, we will require a competitive arena to challenge and improve this future technology. And with the rising climate challenges on our planet, motorsports, especially, needs to be a leader in green and efficient energy technology.

    During the research and concept development phase, the author investigated topics around the issue of motorsport. Research areas included: core values of motorsport fans, AI in offroad vehicles, future target groups Gen Z and Gen Alpha, alternative energies, and benchmark races like Rally Dakar and Roborace. After the broad research, the design ideation took place, starting with several package proposals and initial sketches. Based on those sketches, the author was able to guide the Maya mock-up modeling process where the final design direction was shaped.

    Peking to Paris Rally 2030: a new motorsport series, showcasing the combined strength of human and artificial intelligence under the harshest conditions on the planet. This technology offers new opportunities in racing. Given the advance of intelligent high-performance driving systems, an endurance rally can be even more extreme than it is today. Higher speeds, jumps, twists, and turns across the most diverse terrain will grant the spectator an extraordinary experience. With the use of VR and 3D video capturing drones, rally fans can follow their favorite team -up close and on demand from the start to finish line. The highperformance technology surrounded by the distinctive shape unifies rationality and emotionality into one cohesive design.

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  • 25.
    Andersson, Anton
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Viewpoint: Hur kan personliga hudundersökningar i hemmet  förenklas för att tidigare upptäcka hudförändringar?2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer and the most lethal kind is malignant melanoma. By detecting suspicious skin lesions early the diesease can be cured. Dermatologists stress the importance of checking your own skin regularly in order to mitigate the risk of developing cancer. Today there is only different guides for people who want to examine their skin.This thesis investigates the possibilities of creating a tool for skin self monitoring at home in order to detect lesions earlier.

    The end result ”Viewpoint” is a product that supports and helps users to get an overview of the parts of the body where malignant melanoma most commonly develops.With Viewpoint the user get an overview of the skin like a threedimensional map so that hard to reach areas of the skin can be checked for suspicious lesions. The product has cameras that collect data about the skin and its changes over time and smart image analyzing software gives the user tips and helps to identify areas that require a closer look.

    Thanks to the placement of the product where people already are intimate, it is easy to use it regularly and thereby increase the chance of detecting a pontentially cancerous skin spot early. In the long run this can increase the chance of surviving.

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  • 26.
    Andersson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Hur kan man göra det enklare för äldre människor att duscha ?2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden have a growing population that is getting older, which is putting a strain on our health system. the fear of falling in the bathroom when showering is the main reason why elderly people tend to sit down when taking a shower.This does not mean that they do not have the capacity to stand.It is more difficult to maintain body temperature when sitting down because the water distribution across the body is different. This, in combination with limited mobility skills and blood circulation, makes it quicker to get cold.Implementing an aid at an early stage in life can prevent fall accidents, as well as a preparation for needing help later in life.This project explores how we can facilitate and make it more comfortable for the elderly to shower. This resulted in a flexible shower panel with movable nozzles that are easy to position depending on whether you are standing or sitting in the shower. The product has a discreet and simple design to fit most bathrooms.

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  • 27.
    Andersson, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ett designprojekt med fokus på för tidigt födda barns emotionella behov i kuvös2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Babies born prematurely are deprived of normal sensorimotor stimulation when placed in an artificial environment, the incubator. The aim of this project was to design a series of products that could promote the baby’s emotional and neurological development, and to facilitate parental bonding. 

    The products designed in this project has a theoretical basis on the research available today on cognitive and emotional development in children born prematurely. They were developed in close cooperation with a group of parents and nurses in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Presence is a product collection for developmental care, consisting of a mattress, a figure and a necklace. The mattress has vibration sensors that transfer the mother’s heart beat and speakers with recorded heartbeat and her voice. The figure in silicone is designed for sensorimotor stimulation and can be together with the child in the incubator. The figure wears a cloth with mother’s scent. The cloth can be worn by parent in a necklace made of silicone.

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  • 28.
    Andersson, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Our body body as an expressive tool2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Humans were made to move. Many hours in front of a screen leads to stiff bodies and a diminished bodily awareness. The aim of this project was to explore how technology can serve to increase our body awareness and adapt to our physical conditions in everyday life with focus on office spaces.

    The study is explorative with a user-centered approach and a focus on embodied prototyping, where the user is a subject of design. Data was collected with recordings, interviews, and workshops. Reflexion-on-action, prototyping and iterations lead to the final outcome.

    The final concept is a wearable that encourage people to move and stretch out more often and spontaneously throughout the day. It does so by vibration patterns along your spine and shoulders.

    The idea of this concepts is to make people move often and regularly during the day; to react spontaneously to a reminder from the body, mediated by the vibrations. The system is thought to be self-awarding; if it feels good to stretch out, to extend the arms, to move – then you will want to do it again.

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  • 29. Andrean, Victor
    Hyperborea: Revival of the Grand Tour2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Tracing back human life through the centuries reveals that humans have always been wanderers exploring the world. For thousands of years our distant ancestors travelled the lands as nomads before settling down and founding the first communities which, over time, grew into today's cities. Humans have the impulse to travel out of curiosity and to find out what lays beyond the horizon. Many risked their lives by crossing oceans, climbing mountains or by taking other challenges from nature. Hereby each generation has contributed to the means of transportation as we know it today. Our next generations will cope with many inventions where humans will become obsolete. Autonomous driving, parallel realities and big data assisted products are already upcoming. In order to avoid becoming and feeling superfluous, mankind will search for meaning in their existence. In the 18th century humans have endeavoured travel with the goal to become enlightened for the first time. The Grand Tour was a formative experience for the British youth as part of their education by undertaking a rite of passage through continental Europe. Exposed to the cultural legacy of classical antiquity and the Renaissance many adventures occurred during these travels. Travelers would document, consume and create tokens along the travel and on their return would present these to the less fortunate, who stayed at home, and demonstrate their enlightened and grown minds. The project emcompasses research in the field of future tourism, the purpose of travel and enlightenment. Various design proposals were made using 2D analog and digital sketching tools. These have been furter developed with the use of 3D software and verification of 1:5 scale 3D prints as well as full scale simualtions in VR. The thesis project explores the boundaries of transportation design by offering a fully serviced travel, a revival of the Grand Tour, with the project title 'Rolls-Royce Hyperborea'. The occupants are conducting a travel to create a paradigm shift in order to obtain control of their minds. The goal is to get in touch with the inner self, to see and understand the bigger picture - becoming enlightened in a state of bliss. The project explores interior architectures and the possibilities that come along with autonomous driving by redefining the classical archetype of the Granturismo as we know it today. The interior offers three different modes with unique features to stimulate the occupants in creating a lasting visceral experience.

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  • 30.
    Anna Maria, Puchalska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Solar Literacy: exploration of energy-aware digital experiences.2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master of Fine Arts (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet is rapidly growing in complexity, with increasing negative environmental and social impact. While heating and lighting are tangible examples of energy consumption, internet usage is not perceived as such. Therefore, it opens up opportunities for new, energy-efficient, slower, resource-saving and mindful protocols for the Internet to emerge.

    I propose Glow OS, an operating system that enables individuals and communities to align their online activities with intermittent solar energy. This system aims to accelerate the transition to a fossil-free internet by promoting solar literacy in the spirit of joy.

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  • 31.
    Auricchio, Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Design, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    De Rosa, Annalinda
    Department of Design, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Experiential ways of mapping: revisiting the Desktop Walkthrough2022In: Engaging spaces: how to increase social awarness and human wellbeing through experience design / [ed] Barbara Camocini; Annalisa Dominoni, Milano: FrancoAngeli , 2022, p. 131-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design has formed as a professional field, over time, in relation to social, political, cultural, and industrial transformations. In this process, the ways that designing itself is carried out have responded to these changes as well. There is not one singular way of doing design. The varieties of tools, methods, materials, and situations that design now engages with spans from practices that are well-established since more than a century, to emerging and experimental endeavours that contribute with new approaches and methods. However, attention to the historical origins of design methods is seldom present in contemporary design practice. Instead, methods and tools seem almost timeless, if not neutral. Design’s ways of working are generally not framed in relation to the diverse historical contexts, constellations, and cultures in which they once were formed and introduced. Embedded in the methods applied in design today, however, we can still find traces of the historical situations, concerns, and ideas that they once were made to respond to. An awareness of these embedded historical aspects of designing can bring forth perspectives that support developing what we do in design, and how we relate to the methods that we use. The point of attempting to map a certain design method in relation to its history, therefore, is here not intended as simply a matter of tracing a linear historical genealogy of from where and how this method has come to enter design practice. Through an attention to the historicity of designing, we wish to point to a complex cartography of multi-level relationships between different design practices, diverse conceptual understandings of design, and various trajectories that designing could take towards the future.

    In this chapter we revisit a specific method used within design projects that deal with integrating spatial and service design solutions, the desktop walkthrough. Through exploring its possible connections to and relationships with previous experiential ways of mapping spatial and environmental interactions, we wish to move beyond discussing what such a method instrumentally “does” and highlight some of the embedded historical and conceptual understandings it brings into designing.

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  • 32.
    Auricchio, Valentina
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Politecnico di Milano.
    Mapping Design Methods: A Reflection on Design Histories for Contemporary Design Practices2021In: AIS/Design, ISSN 2281-7603, Vol. 8, no 15, p. 132-146, article id 15-08Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a direction for a research endeavour bringing togetherdesign research and design historical research from a perspective of contem-porary design methods. There is a need to probe and question the historiesand geographies of design’s methods, to explore how they could contribute toexpanding conceptual foundations and develop new ways of designing.We are proposing a programmatic framework that brings design methods tothe attention of design history, and to historicity of design in design prac-tices, by sketching a map, a geography in time, to move toward a deeperunderstanding of the evolution of methods linked to the specific cultures andcontexts from which they emerge. It is a starting point for a wider researchproject, an example bringing design historical and design methodologicalresearch agendas closer to each other. Starting from interviews with Italiandesigners we highlight the need for a deeper and continued investigation intodesign histories of design methods.

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  • 33.
    Ausinsch, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    HUR KAN VI REDUCERA DEN INTERNA ÖVERGÖDNINGEN SAMT REGLERA ALGBLOMNINGAR FRÅN ATT NÅ EGENTLIGAÖSTERSJÖNS KUSTZON ?”: En vision om att återfå en balans i Östersjön genom att skörda algöverskott och använda biomassan som en framtida råvara.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is one of the world’s most polluted seas. Increased discharge of nutrients due to greater populations of people, together with a slow water exchange, creates great stress on the sea. Too much nutrients leads to increased growth of algae and causes problem in the ecosystem. Even if we reduce nutrient discharge the problem still exist in the ocean. When algae dies and sinks, more nutritional substances is produced called "internal eutrophication". This phenomenon will grow in the future due to a warmer climate and the problem is spreading towards the coastal zone, which is an important site for fish recreation. By removing the abundance of algae, the nutritional and toxic substances are reduced and the algae biomass can be a future resource for biofuel production.

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  • 34.
    Aytekin, Cenk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Living an Active Life with Asthma2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 2019 a striking 400 million people worldwide will be living with asthma. Environment, genetics and lifestyle are all factors that are assumed to cause this chronic disease. The current treatment of asthma is focused on medication, and wellness through exercise is not promoted. The benefits of an active lifestyle for asthmatics are many and include a reduced medication dose, increased tolerance to triggers and less asthma symptoms. Regular exercise can therefore dramatically decrease the effects of asthma and the mental and physical limitations that may follow. However, many asthmatics experience difficulties maintaining an active lifestyle due to the fear of having an exercise-induced asthma attack. There is also reluctance to the necessary intake of the high dosage of preventive medication.

  • 35.
    Bachmann, Lea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A provocation around the ethics in human-conversational agent relationships: A contribution to an ethically responsible future between humans and conversational agents2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The usage of conversational agents in domestic spaces is increasing every year and with this ethical issues that we have not anticipated will arise, both because these relationships are human-like and not human-like.This thesis shows that ethically responsible relations- hips between humans and conversational agents in private contexts and domestic environments are much more than conversational design. This project is not primarily focussing on designing dialogues, words, and voices but takes a closer look at the qualities and values these relationships are based on. It is looking at how agents are staged, using design fiction as a methodlogy and medium to raise questions around the impacts of these relati- onships. Furthermore, it is also pointing out some of the possible unintended consequences that could occur if these agents are staged, like personaswith human-like features or if technology goes in between human-human relationships.After multiple design explorations and realizing how complex human-agent and human-human re-lationships are, I realized that the best way to make an impact was not to provide solutions on how ethically responsible relationships between humans and conversational agents should look like. Instead, I have created a set of fictional design ar- tifacts in different future contexts. They aim to point out what designers who design for these relations- hips need to tweak and pay attention to to create more ethically responsible futures.As I created these design fictions, I aimed to find a good balance between humor, provocation, and abstraction to leave room for people‘s imagination. In addition, I am hoping to provoke enough for my audience to feel triggered to raise even more re- levant questions and point out further opportunities for other designers to build on my work.Finally, a fictional design organization was created, which I called “A(i)activists“. I see this as a space where the design fiction can live on and a great medium to communicate the project vision and mis- sion and create a small place for ongoing debates and input from a diverse audience.

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  • 36. Barbosa, Janaina T.
    et al.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Mota, João A.
    Power of design agency in building and sustaining collaboration: two cases in São Paulo2017In: Nordes 2017: DESIGN+POWER, Nordes , 2017, no 7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research has considered the power of collaboration in terms of the politics of artefacts, services and practices to build or to support publics. Working within a framework of “commons” as continuing processes of negotiation in collaboration, this study asks: How can designskills and agency build up collaborative capacities in urban communities for sustained processes of social innovation? This qualitative research explores two case studies in Brazil, where design agency is identified in social practices carried out by both designers and non-designers. Three key processes involved in designing collaboration were identified: experimenting, disrupting and sustaining. This work concluded that design skills facilitate the distribution of power to build collaboration through co-production of common spaces. This investigation contributes to the ongoing discussion of design and “infrastructuring,” identifying the power of design agency in building and sustaining collaboration in a complex social landscape of an emerging city.

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  • 37.
    Bauer, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Aesthetics and temporality of shared memories2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master of Fine Arts (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the aesthetics of shared memories, specifically on how additional insights and infor-mation might trigger and alter our perception of a shared incident and experience. Delving deeper into the aesthetics of human recollections might help us gain a better understan-ding and appreciation for ourselves as well as for one another.Even though memory itself is somet-hing individual, most of it is shared (or at the very least linked) with others and is therefore dependent on exter-nal influences and how we interpret them. Our recollection fully relies on what we consciously and unconsci-ously choose to pay attention and at-tach value to. Even if we have shared the same moment, our memories may differ in terms of the facts we recall and how we interpret that information. To explore this topic further, I decided to focus on the aesthetics and mea-ning of shared memories and their ability to alter our perceptions. It was critical for me to maintain a poetic and experimental approach throug-hout the process to grasp the subject on a more abstract level and not lose sight of the aesthetics of memories and their interplay.My project is envisioned as an immer-sive experience that emphasises and includes embodied interaction in or-der to create an environment condu-cive to exploratory engagement and conversation by discussing shared memories. Through this approach, I intend to encourage the users to en-gage in more self-reflection and the-refore build stronger bonds between one another. At this point I would like to emphasise that, for the time being, the context is purely centred on recol-lecting and establishing an intimate moment between the users. Following the completion of my thesis, I intend to reflect on this project in order to determine how it might be expanded to further operate on a societal level in the future.

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  • 38.
    Beauprez, Kimberley
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Carefree in 2060: Pension saving for a full life2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master of Fine Arts (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The pension system in Sweden today is a very simple system. Taxed incomes generate pension incomes, paid out monthly after retirement. Yet the topic seems riddled with emotions; guilt, shame and anxiety over what you should or should not do. Increasing inflation, population age and climate change are projected to pose big threats to pensions in the coming decades. By 2060, pension incomes are projected to diminish substantially. Yet the future brings hope too; the gender gap in pension incomes is today at 30% and is projected to go down to 4% by 2040 as the changing view on women in the workplace and policy making is evening the (occupational) field.

    To learn about pension on the personal, professional and societal layers, I conducted conversations with professionals working for the pension agency, banks, savings solutions and researchers at economics and sociology departments at universities, as well as with individuals with pension planning on their minds (or not). The professionals argued that financial literacy teaches how simple the system is while the individuals feel overwhelmed and confused, showing that the system is not complicated but feels complicated. This dissonance became the space for designing.

    I propose to look at money as an actor we have a relationship with, to scale away guilt, shame or anxiety and leverage the positives. Through the strategic use of reflection, we learn about our ongoing relationship with money; formed in childhood, and shaped by everyday life planning towards the future. Thus, we grow towards a life where money serves us by investing in our values, hopes and dreams. As we change our financial behaviour today, we change our relationship in the future.

    The value of money does not start with the currency, but with the intention of use, in the hopes and dreams of a person that wants to spend their time with families and hobbies, not with stocks and funds. Looking at financial planning more holistically shows how the established system is biased, rejecting those that do not speak the language. We as designers can be mindful of this and make more inclusive tools to learn this financial language. Insofar the system can be changed is what I examine through speculative futures methods and designs.

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  • 39. Beck, Jordan
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Examining Practical, Everyday Theory Use in Design Research2016In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726 , Vol. 2, no 2, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how theories (as objects) are used in articles published in Design Studies. While theory and theory construction have been given time and attention in the literature, less is known about how researchers put theories to work in their written texts about practical, everyday theory use. In the present paper, we examine 32 articles and synthesize six models of theory use based on our examination.

  • 40. Beck, Jordan
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Examining the Types of Knowledge Claims Made in Design Research2016In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726 , Vol. 2, no 3, p. 199-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been written about designerly knowledge and designerly ways of knowing in the professions, less has been written about the production and presentation of knowledge in the design discipline. In the present paper, we examine the possibility that knowledge claims might be an effective way to distinguish the design discipline from other disciplines. We compare the kinds of knowledge claims made in journal publications from the natural sciences, social sciences, and design. And we find that natural and social science publications tend to make singular knowledge claims of similar kinds whereas design publications often contain multiple knowledge claims of different kinds. We raise possible explanations for this pattern and its implications for design research. Examining the Types of Knowledge Claims Made in Design Research.

  • 41.
    Becze, Joseph
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Volvo VISE2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Every year over 1.35 Million lives are lost to road accidents. Trucks are probably the most dangerous vehicles on public roads due to their size and mass. 15% of all accidents involve trucks and the majority of victims are car occupants. Most of these accidents happen outside of urban areas at high speeds. In the dawn of autonomous drive and electromobility the trucking industry has the opportunity to reinvent their products. Volvo Trucks is a company that has Safety in its DNA. Future Volvo trucks could be tailored around Safety to save lives and bring justice to this core

    value. Autonomy has the potential to make road accidents history in the long run. Before that becomes a reality, society will face a transitioning period where autonomous vehicles will share the space with manually driven vehicles. Communication between human and machine will be more important that ever.

    Product Designers must account also for situations where an accident is unavoidable. The focus of this project is to explore what safety means for the human eye. How do we perceive safety visually and how do we create trust?

    Trucks are versatile products built with modularity in mind. Manufacturers are

    responsible for delivering a capable tractor unit. Trailers and other accessories are built externally. Throughout the process of this project a holistic approach was adopted. The only way to have full control over the product experience is to design

    a complete product: trailer and tractor unit. Volvo Trucks experts are consulted along

    the way covering key points of interest such as Passive Safety, User Experience

    Design and Aerodynamics. Benchmarking of existing concepts sets a starting point.

    Initial explorations question the architecture of conventional trucks. Different set-ups and layouts are proposed. Each decision is made based on various safety needs of the future semi-autonomous traffic. Analog sketches and digital renderings of design proposals build the way towards a key sketch. The chosen design direction is further developed and built in CAD. The vehicle is designed with an eye on its environment. The link between truck and car, truck and human is the core of this project.

    This vehicle sheds light on the mystery of how autonomous vehicles will blend with traffic as it is known today. Focusing on long haul highway routs Volvo VISE is designed to execute hub to hub transport services autonomously.

    Signals used to communicate in road traffic are translated to the digital age. By being able to understand its environment and react to it, Volvo VISE comes to life with a soul of its own. Through various sensors and autonomous technology the vehicle measures each traffic situation and earns the trust of its surroundings through clear communication of intent. With soft and generous shapes the exterior design describes a friendly vehicle that wins over its audience at the first glance. Volvo VISE has a deeper understanding of safety. Beneath the skin and besides its capability to communicate, the vehicle is equipped with several passive safety features, taking control in every situation. Volvo VISE ensures road safety for all.

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  • 42.
    Beller, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    FLUX: Rethinking two-wheel mobility2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project has investigated how to reshape two-wheel mobility in a more functional driven way, without losing the thrill of riding a motorcycle. The intitial cue was offered by the current rise of electric powertrains in the market. The opportunity of finding new spaces in the existing motorcycle architecture that could increase it's functionality and safety served as inspiration for this project. By achieving these steps this project wishes to envision a product that can attract new audiences whilst making two-wheel mobility more accessible.

    The process involved a variety of techniques that range from concept creation to 3D visualisation. During the ideation phase digital and analogue sketching techniques were combined after benchmarking existing products and visualising through animations possible solutions. In a later step the design was refined using digital painting in addition to polygon modelling. It has been helpful to evaluate the product in VR through various steps of the process, this provided a better understanding of the volumes and enabled a more accurate design of certain components.

    The result of the project is Flux. Combining unusual materials, like silicone, with a new layout offered the possibility of creating a simple yet advanced solution that provides various benefits to riding in everyday life. These benefits range from an enhanced cargo capability to an easier way to swap or recharge the batteries. In addition, it features some seamlessly integrated technology improvements that are vowed to make riding safer, without compromising on the experience.

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  • 43.
    Berg, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Canoo Link: From City to Nature2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People in cities have a need of recreation. Leisure activities are a big part of people’s health and well- being. Many leisure activities are practiced outside in the nature. Today many citizens do not own a car and public transportation fail to meet the peoples need to move out from the city center out into the wild nature. Public transportation run according to a certain timetable and an established route. They also come with restrictions of what you can bring on board. In other words, there is a need for agile transportation that transport people and their equipment from the city out to the nature; and the need will only increase as the urbanization continue.

    The whole idea of the project originated from the question, “How might future mobility adapt to fit people’s need for recreation?” The project started with a research. The author studied trends how cities will develop, what defines generation Z, how 6G can be used in the future transportation industry, how electrification changes the terms of car design, the current status of autonomous technology etc. The research also included Canoo, a car company that design, develop and build electric vehicles with focus on lifestyle, utility and sustainability. After completed research, the project moved into a creative phase which included analog sketches of the vehicle, testing of proportions in scale 1: 1 and a storyboard that describes how the vehicle can be used. When thecreative phase was done, the project moved to its final phase; visualization. A 3D model was constructed in Autodesk Maya, a polygonal modelling software, and rendered images of the 3D model was conducted with Autodesk VRED, a 3D visualization software.

    The project resulted in Canoo Link; Link, targeting year 2035, is an electric autonomous utility vehicle that you subscribe to. It can carry 4 passengers and has storage space to haul equipment and supplies for canoeing, mountain biking etc. With its robust design and high ground clearance it is ready to take on some tough terrain. The subscription offers the customer full disposal of the vehicle during the activities for convenience and security. It acts like a hub for your activities, not just as a vehicle for commuting.

    To summarize; Link is a design proposal of a vehicle that connect people living in cities to the nature. It is not just a car that takes you from one point to another, it is a lifestyle.

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  • 44.
    Bergbom, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    HOME DIALYSIS: HOW COULD THE DIALYSIS TREATMENT BE OPTIMIZED IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE THE AFFECT TO THE PATIENTS LIVES?2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    2006 my mother had to start her dialysis treatment due to renal failure caused by a congenital defect on her kidneys. With this mandatory readjustment to her life she accepted all changes that were made. 

    Patients with renal failure (when the kidneys fail to adequately filter the blood from waste) are increasing all over the world and 2020 it is calculated to exceed 3.8 million. The cause for renal failure could be one of many, but it is often seen as an outcome of heavy dehydration, severe infection or long-term diabetes which could explain the increasing number of patients.

    The most common treatment for renal failure is hemo dialysis. This treatment is an effective way to clean the blood outside the body in an artificial kidney connected to the patient by a hemo dialysis machine. The patients are spending 6-7 hours 4 days a week at hospitals to clean their blood which is comparable with an 80% employment. By adapting the hemo dialysis to where the patient live, I want to show that there are better ways to effectively treat patients.

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  • 45.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Integrated Product Development, School of Industrial Technology and Management, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindh Karlsson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    Integrated Product Development, School of Industrial Technology and Management, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Innopoly: Design steps towards proficiency in innovative practices2011In: DS 69: Proceedings of E and PDE 2011, the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, the Design society , 2011, p. 281-286Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents design steps to bundle innovation skills in an educational model that in our previous research involved ideas and construct foundations rooted in a game plan ideology that aims at examining innovativeness [1]. In this paper, our ambition is to deepen students' abilities for self-governed innovative practices within a team. The paper presents an educational model towards embracing design creativity building on the foundations of a game plan ideology formed to examine innovation-driven practices. It also sets out to find a way to communicate a coveted and sustainable knowledge and to motivate the learning since it will affect the momentum of a self-driven learning process. We have used a series of workshops, focus groups and course analysis with engineering design students to frame and concretize the 'Innopoly' educational platform. The educational prototype 'Innopoly' consists of an inclination model inspired by Bloom's taxonomy whose ambition is to prepare our students for future challenges. The implementation efforts of specific interdisciplinary design elements aim to strengthen the acknowledgement of how to carry out a common and open innovative process and a holistic perspective. The ambition to examine innovative practices is fulfilled by incorporation of skills applied to manifest an autonomous level of performance and integrity. 'Innopoly' carries the outline logics from the innovation process - identification, research, ideation, concept, prototyping, testing and commercialization - similar to the increase of value that can be traced back to the original game form. In summary, the proposed 'Innopoly' prototype comprises both an operational (i.e. course activity) level of description and a strategic (i.e. course design) level rooted in Bloom's taxonomy to leverage students' innovation-related experiences and knowledge. In this paper we focus on the operational level; the learning and game fundamentals.

  • 46.
    Berglund, Eeva
    et al.
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Kohtala, Cindy
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Knowing and imagining with sustainable makers2021In: In search of lost futures: anthropological explorations in multimodality, deep interdisciplinarity, and autoethnography / [ed] Magdalena Kazubowski-Houston; Mark Auslander, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1, p. 151-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Materialist Activist Communities (MACs) concern themselves with material flows in a politically engaged form of maker culture. They speculate, design and make collectively, with a marked environmental orientation, often developing impossible forms of bio-hacking and bio-art. The futures animating them grow out of technoscientific and mundane presents, but as they make knowledge on the sidelines, materializing the existing and the improbable, such groups render the Anthropocene and more-than-human futures tangible. While “maker culture” has been prone to techno-utopian hype, MACs embrace dirt, mess and bodies nurturing a “dirt way” of learning, a principled way of being in situated and partial confusion. We imagine alongside them, also in the dirt way, through ethnography, an explicitly messy way of working out what is important and why.

  • 47.
    Berglund, Emanuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Umeå insitute of design.
    PULS, minskad smittspridning på offentliga gym2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Träning idag blir bara allt mer och mer populärt och gymmet är en av de platser som växer mest. Detta sätter dock höga krav på hygien och sanitet hos de som vistas på dessa anläggningar; något som ofta visar sig vara bristfälligt när man kollar lite mer noggrant.

    Detta projekt visar tankeprocessen från idé till färdigt koncept för en produkt som är tänkt att minska spridning av bakterier och virus på offentliga gym.Resultatet blev en liten kompakt lampa som kan monteras på olika platser på gymmet och med hjälp av far UV-C ljus minska mängden bakterier och virus på ett säkert och hållbart sett. Produkten syftar även till att underlätta för de som tränar på gym och ta bort ansvaret att rengöra från kunderna och istället skapa en automatiserad lösning som låter de tränande fokuserade på sitt.

    Lampan är designad för att smälta in i gymmet och inte dra för mycket uppmärksamhet till sig.

    Download full text (pdf)
    PULS, minskad smittspridning på offentliga gym
  • 48. Bergström, Jenny
    et al.
    Clark, Brendon
    Interactive Institute, Kista, Sweden; University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Frigo, Alberto
    Mazé, Ramia
    Redström, Johan
    Interactive Institute, Kista, Sweden; Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Becoming materials: material forms and forms of practice2010In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 155-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of development toward ‘smart’ materials, materials now enable an expanding range of aesthetic expressions and user experiences. These materials are fundamentally temporal in their capacity to assume multiple, discrete states of expression that can be repeatedly and minutely controlled. These materials come to be, or become, only over time and in context—they are becoming materials. Thus, in the development and application of such materials, we must engage more extensively with the experience of materials in practices of design and of use. This paper introduces and discusses the concept of becoming materials—as well as the implications for practice—through a series of examples from our own practice-led research within art, design and architecture. Coming to terms with the implications for material practices of design and of use, we suggest, requires the development of new concepts and methods for doing and studying the design of becoming materials.

  • 49.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Duval, Jared
    University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Wilde, Danielle
    University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Segura, Elena Márquez
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pañella, Oscar Garcia
    ENTI – Universitat de Barcelona Barcelona, Spain.
    Badal León, Laia
    Fundació Alícia, Sant Fruitós de Bages, Spain.
    Chasing play potentials in food culture to inspire technology design2019In: CHI PLAY '19 Extended Abstracts: Extended Abstracts of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 829-834Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a Situated Play Design (SPD) workshop aimed at exploring how culture and traditions can guide playful design. Using food as an accessible starting point, we invite scholars from diverse communities to share, analyze, and make creative use of playful traditions, and prototype new and interesting eating experiences. Through hands-on engagement with traditions, play and technology, we will discuss strategies to make designerly use of forms of play that are embedded in culture. The outcomes of the workshop will be twofold: First, in response to recent calls for increasingly situated and emergent play design methods, we explore strategies to chase culturally-grounded play. Second, we produce an annotated portfolio of "play potentials" to inspire the design of future food-related technologies. The workshop will contribute to enriching the set of tools available for designers interested in play and technologies for everyday-use, in and beyond the food domain.

  • 50.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    Social and Emotional Technology Lab UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Jhaveri, Samvid
    Social and Emotional Technology Lab UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Lutz, Rosa
    Social and Emotional Technology Lab UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Social and Emotional Technology Lab UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Wilde, Danielle
    SDU Design University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Making sense of human-food interaction2019In: CHI '19: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id 678Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity in Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research is skyrocketing across a broad range of disciplinary interests and concerns. The dynamic and heterogeneous nature of this emerging field presents a challenge to scholars wishing to critically engage with prior work, identify gaps and ensure impact. It also challenges the formation of community. We present a Systematic Mapping Study of HFI research and an online data visualisation tool developed to respond to these issues. The tool allows researchers to engage in new ways with the HFI literature, propose modifications and additions to the review, and thereby actively engage in community-making. Our contribution is threefold: (1) we characterize the state of HFI, reporting trends, challenges and opportunities; (2) we provide a taxonomy and tool for diffractive reading of the literature; and (3) we offer our approach for adaptation by research fields facing similar challenges, positing value of the tool and approach beyond HFI.

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