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  • 1.
    Areljung, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Due, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Skoog, Marianne
    Sundberg, Bodil
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Why and how teachers make use of drawing activities in early childhood science education2021Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 43, nr 13, s. 2127-2147Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have provided many arguments for why drawing may contribute to science learning. However, little is known about how teachers in early childhood education (ECE) make use of drawing for science learning purposes. This article examines how teachers’ views and framing of drawing activities influence the science learning opportunities afforded to children in the activities. We use activity theory to analyse teacher interviews and observation data from ten science classrooms (children aged 3–8 years) where drawing activities occurred. The interviews reveal that few of the teachers relate drawing to science learning specifically. Rather, they portray drawing as a component of variation in teaching and learning in general. Looking at what happens in the classrooms, we conclude that drawing has a relatively weak position as means of communicating and learning science. Instead, the teaching emphasis is on writing or on ‘making a product’. However, there are examples where teachers explicitly use drawing for science learning purposes. These teachers are the same few who, in interviews, relate drawing to science learning specifically. Based on these findings, we encourage school teachers, teacher educators, and researchers to identify, and overcome,obstacles to realising the pedagogical potentials of drawing in ECE science classrooms.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Using Model-based Scaffolds to Support Students Solving Context-based Chemistry Problems2018Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, nr 10, s. 1176-1197Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning aims to make learning more meaningful by raising meaningful problems. However, these types of problems often require reflection and thinking processes that are more complex and thus more difficult for students, putting high demands on students’ problem-solving capabilities. In this paper, students’ approaches when solving context-based chemistry problems and effects of systematic scaffolds are analysed based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity. Most answers were initially assigned to the lowest level of the model; higher levels were reached without scaffolds only by few students and by most students with scaffolds. The results are discussed with regard to practical implications in terms of how teachers could make use of context-based tasks and aligned scaffolds to help students in this activity.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Günter, K. P.
    et al.
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Bussière, L. F.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gromes, R.
    Centre for Organismal Studies Heidelberg, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Dedicating, faking, and surviving: disclosing tensions in how three women university students negotiate collectively celebrated norms across European contexts2023Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 45, nr 12, s. 1032-1052Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education biology (HEB), a discipline where women undergraduates are numerically overrepresented in most Western universities, has been given little attention in exploring norms of scientific practice from a student perspective. This study brings into focus how biology students negotiate identities in relation to figured worlds of HEB. Through thematic analysis of 27 timeline interviews from a Swedish, German, and British university as a collective case, we identified three hegemonic imaginaries across narratives: showing dedication through sacrifice, faking it to make it, and surviving as the fittest. Using a theoretical framework of feminist science critique, science identity, and figured worlds, we then offer a multiple case approach to how three women students negotiate the collective imaginaries identified, while simultaneously disavowing and challenging them. This conflict suggests they consider themselves successful despite the pressure to engage in 'typical' scientific practices they simultaneously contest. Consequently, this study demonstrates that celebrated imaginaries do not remain unproblematised by successful students, but create tensions in their identity work. This provokes discussions on how science imaginaries shape women's participation in HEB and beyond. Visualising these tensions makes it furthermore possible to challenge and change hegemonic academic norms in HEB, moving towards more socially just and inclusive spaces.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Culturally equipped for socio-scientific issues?: a comparative study on how teachers and students in mono- and multiethnic schools handle work with complex issues2011Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 33, nr 13, s. 1835-1859Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-scientific issues (SSI) are not only said to increase students' interest in science, but they also strengthen the generic skills of teamwork, problem-solving, and media literacy. At the same time, these skills are prerequisites for successful work with SSI. The aim of the study is to analyze what happens when SSI are implemented in science classrooms with various degrees of ethnic diversity and socio-cultural status. We are also interested in knowing how teachers structure the SSI work from discourses on what suits different students. Quantitative and qualitative methods are combined, for example, questionnaires and ethnographic fieldwork, presented through partial least squares analysis and thick descriptions. We can notice discursive differences between 'Us' and 'The Other' and between mono- and multiethnic schools. In an earlier research, images of differences between the different student groups emerged, and we can find these in the results from the questionnaires. In an observation study, another pattern appeared that indicated similarities rather than differences between mono- and multiethnic classrooms. The students are first of all inside the discourse of 'the successful student.' Noteworthy is that the teachers' roles correspond better with the discourse than with how students actually act. The study also shows that SSI articulate a collision between different discourses on education: a discourse on differences between students in multi- and monoethnic classrooms; a discourse on how to become a successful student; and a discourse on the school's mission to educate participating citizens. It is suggested that schools should relate to, expose, and articulate discursive clashes that emerge when introducing new work forms.

  • 5.
    Kobayashi, Sofie
    et al.
    Independent Researcher, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Learning norms of science through laughter: a study of humour in life science supervision2022Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 44, nr 10, s. 1680-1699Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore how norms of science are given attention through laughter in life science doctoral supervision. Four supervision sessions were observed and video recorded. All laugh units were identified, and instances of humour were coded in relation to norms of science. Our analysis reveals tensions around how to do valid research, governance vs. administration and the willingness to make sacrifices. Balancing between validity and feasibility and between quality and quantity, not to mention the importance of scepticism in intellectual conversation, are other important norms of science highlighted in the interaction. We found that norms of science are a vital part of life science supervision and that supervisors play a critical role in the process of socialising PhD students into becoming researchers. We saw how PhD students are taught to navigate these norms, that is, how they are supposed to behave in these complex normative systems. We recognised that the norm of calling has many benefits for researchers in natural science but may pose a threat to good work–life balance for PhD students. Since humour is a powerful form of communication, we recommend that supervisors reflect on how laughter is used as well as which norms and values they teach.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Ottander, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Simon, Shirley
    Institute of Education, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Learning democratic participation?: Meaning-making in discussion of socioscientific issues in science education2021Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 43, nr 12, s. 1895-1925Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning democratic participation as future citizens is an important goal for science education for all students. To take part in debates and decision-making involving socioscientific issues, such as sustainability, students need to become aware of different positions and dilemmas regarding such issues. This study seeks to understand how democratic participation is constructed by 45 student participants aged 16 years, for whom science is not the main course of study. Students worked in small groups on tasks that involved discussion of two different socioscientific issues. The analysis of student discourse used a theoretical perspective from discursive psychology, and shows how students deal with ideological dilemmas and resolve different positions within their discussions. Five ‘interpretative repertoires’ were identified from student talk illustrating the dilemmas occurring in the specific SSIs and also the function of science within the discussion. Through identifying interpretative repertoires used by the students, the stances they take and the function of science in their discussions, the study sheds light on how democratic participation can be learnt in a science education context.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    et al.
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Areljung, Sofie
    UmSER; School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Due, Karin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. UmSER.
    Ekström, Kenneth
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. UmSER.
    Tellgren, Britt
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Opportunities for and obstacles to science in preschools: views from a community perspective2018Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, nr 17, s. 2061-2077Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, Activity Theory (AT) is used to analyse general patterns for how cultural and historical factors interact with the shaping of science activities in preschools. Data was produced from field notes, video observations, video stimulated recall group discussions and individual interviews with preschool teachers at fourteen preschool units, where science activities were described as a common feature of the practice. Two factors were found to be particularly important for how and whether science learning opportunities were afforded the children: the structure of the preschool community and the type of educational culture within it. In communities characterised by weak mutual commitment and without joint understanding of the purpose of the activities, the science learning objects of the activity often became fragmented and thereby elusive. This was also true for strong communities, with a shared approach and a joint understanding of the purpose of the science activities, but with educational cultures where science learning was not actively supported. In contrast, a strong community combined with an educational culture that allowed teachers to lead and intentionally frame the science content, offered child-centred science activities with clear science learning objects.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Vesterinen, Veli-Matti
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. a Department of Mathematics and Science Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tolppanen, Sakari
    Aksela, Maija
    Toward citizenship science education: what students do to make the world a better place?2016Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, nr 1, s. 30-50Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    With increased focus on sustainability and socioscientific issues, dealing with issues related to citizenship is now seen as an important element of science education. However, in order to make the world a better place, mere understanding about socioscientific issues is not enough. Action must also be taken. In this study, 35 international gifted students-potential scientists-aged 15-19 were interviewed to investigate what they were doing to make the world a better place. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with focus on students' actions toward a better world, their rationalizations for such actions, and the role of science in the rationalizations. The analysis shows that students consciously take a wide range of actions, and that they see citizenship as a process of constant self-development. The three categories created to highlight the variation in the ways students take action were personally responsible actions, participatory actions, and preparing for future. Although many students saw that science and scientists play a big role in solving especially the environmental problems, most of them also discussed the structural causes for problems, as well as the interplay of social, economic, and political forces. The results indicate that citizenship science education should take the variety of students' actions into consideration, give students the possibility to take individual and participatory action, as well as give students opportunities to get to know and discuss the ways a career in science or engineering can contribute to saving the world.

  • 9.
    Wiberg, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik.
    Rolfsman, Ewa
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    The association between science achievement measures in schools and TIMSS science achievements in Sweden2019Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 41, nr 16, s. 2218-2232Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between students’ TIMSS (Trends in Mathematics and Science Study) science achievement, and students’ school achievements, in terms of national tests and grades from school years 6 and 9. Further to examine the association with TIMSS science achievement and different subgroups of students based on their home background. The study is based on a unique possibility to analyse TIMSS 2015 data together with register data of the Swedish students’ national test results from school years 6 and 9 and their science subject grades from school years 6 and 9. The overall results show that there were moderate associations between TIMSS science achievement and school achievement measures. The association between grades and the high-stakes national tests were stronger than between grades and TIMSS. The students’ home background had a clear impact on the results as students with highly educated mothers, who comes from homes with many books and are nonimmigrants had on average higher TIMSS science achievements.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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