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  • 1.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Capturing user experiences of mobile information technology with the repertory grid technique2010In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 250-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the application of the repertory grid technique (RGT) as a tool for capturing the user experience of technological artifacts. In noting the artificiality of assessing the emotional impact of interactive artifacts in isolation from cognitive judgments, we argue that HCI techniques must provide practical solutions regarding how to assess the holistic meaning of users’ interactive experiences. RGT is a candidate for this role. This paper takes the reader step by step through setting up, conducting, and analyzing a RGT study. RGT is a technique on the border between qualitative and quantitative research, unique in that it respects the wholeness of cognition and does not separate the intellectual from the emotional aspects of the user experience. Compared to existing methods in HCI, RGT has the advantage of treating experiences holistically, while also providing a degree of quantitative precision and generalizability in their capture.

  • 2.
    Harr, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Whittaker, Steve
    UCSC.
    Understanding search behavior in professional social networks2011In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 194-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an empirical study of social interaction in a professional social network. As the point of departure, we take previous research into distributed work and information foraging theory to explore interaction search behavior of individuals active in professional networks, examining how social factors govern their behavior. For this exploration, we focused on the process through which relevant collaborators are chosen to execute shared work tasks in the area of logistics, and identified six characteristics of the explored processes. We recognized the “survival of the social” as a cornerstone for efficient and long-term professional networks and outlined design implications arising from our findings. More specifically, we found that participants are oriented to solutions that involve active social agents and social relations, rather than optimizing based on task characteristics, efficiency, and cost. These behaviors motivate the need for the concept of social interaction foraging.

  • 3.
    Maier, Maximilian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Harr, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Dark Design Patterns: An End-user Perspective2020In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 170-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of websites and mobile applications available is growing continually, as are the persuasive approaches to influence human behavior and decision making. Although designing for persuasion offers several potential benefits, recent developments expose various deceptive designs, that is, dark patterns, that utilize psychological factors to nudge people toward, from someone else’s perspective, desired directions. This paper contributes to an increased awareness of the phenomenon of dark patterns through our exploring how users perceive and experience these patterns. Hence, we chose a qualitative research approach, with focus groups and interviews, for our exploration. Our analysis shows that participants were moderately aware of these deceptive techniques, several of which were perceived as sneaky and dishonest. Respondents further expressed a resigned attitude toward such techniques and primarily blamed businesses for their occurrence. Users considered their dependency on services employing these practices, thus making it difficult to avoid fully dark patterns.

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