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  • 1.
    Allen, Mary Dallas
    et al.
    School of Social Work, University of Alaska, Anchorage, USA.
    Gonzales, Debbie
    Cal Poly Humboldt University, USA.
    Sauer, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Special Issue on Social Work in the Time of COVID-19: Focus on Impacts on Clients and Consequences for Practice and Profession2022In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 2.
    Allen, Mary Dallas
    et al.
    University of Alaska Anchorage United States.
    Gonzalez, Debbie
    Humboldt State University United States.
    Sauer, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Special Issue on Social Work in the Time of COVID-192021In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 3.
    Ellingsen, Ingunn T.
    et al.
    Universitetet i Stavanger.
    Studsröd, Ingunn
    Universitetet i Stavanger.
    Muñoz-Guzmán, Carolina
    Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.
    The child, the parents, the family and the state: Chile and Norway compared2019In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 93-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gümüscü, Ahmet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Khoo, Evelyn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Family as Raw Material – the Deconstructed Family in the Swedish Social Services2014In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, no 2, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on how families are defined and conceptualized by social workers in the Swedish social services. Using a qualitative study design, we carried out telephone interviews with 60 social workers in five major sectors of the social services in two smaller and two larger municipalities. These sectors included elderly care, disability, child welfare, addiction and economic support, with a qualitative content analysis approach used to analyze the data.The results showed that the practices in social service organizations are both individualized and specialized. Social workers primarily focus on the individual as the client when deciding upon interventions, and when asked about how they regard, define and delimit the family in their work, our analysis revealed that different mediating mechanisms were engaged in what can be seen as a deconstruction of the family. These mechanisms included legislation (as a control mechanism), household composition (boundary mechanism) and service needs (professional mechanism), which were used in various ways and to differing degrees within each sector. The resultant five unique and sector-specific conceptualizations of families are implicated in how interventions are constructed and work processes targeted at individuals and families.

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  • 5.
    Nygren, Lennart
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Christie, Alastair
    University College Cork, Department of Applied Social Studies, Republic of Ireland.
    Muñoz Guzmán, Carolina
    School of Social Work, Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile.
    Naujaniené, Rasa
    Social Work department, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania.
    Welfare regimes and social workers' conceptions of social problems and professional roles: a comparative study of Chile, Ireland, Lithuania and Sweden2023In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 207-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares social work in countries representing four different welfare regimes: Chile, the Republic of Ireland (refer to elsewhere as ‘Ireland’), Lithuania and Sweden. The aim is to examine how social workers in different contexts refer to families’ complex needs, how contextual factors influence social workers’ positions and actions, and how they make sense of their work. Social workers in 15 focus groups, 4 per country except for Chile with 3, were interviewed about their conceptions of ‘family’, ‘families with complex needs’, and reasoning about interventions in relation to a fictitious complex case vignette. The understanding of complex needs appears relatively individualized in Chile and Lithuania, while contextual factors were more pronounced in the Irish and Swedish material. Chile, exemplifying a familialized family policy regime, reflects a poverty-compensatory social worker role that also supports familial reproduction; Ireland, a partly de-familialized regime, reflects a supportive and risk-reactive role; Lithuania, a re-familialized regime reflects a patriarchal risk-reducing role and Sweden, a de-familialized policy regime, reflects a rights-oriented and technocratic role. Welfare regimes shape different social work practice contexts. However, to some extent, social workers around the world share a common work ethos in how they, for the best interest of the people they work with, deal with the cross-pressure from social problems and political-ideological priorities.

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  • 6.
    Nygren, Lennart
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Oltedal, Siv
    Universitetet i Stavanger, Norge.
    Constructing a vignette for qualitative comparative family research2015In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 7.
    Oltedal, Siv
    et al.
    Universitetet i Stavanger.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Editorial: Families in context2014In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, no 2, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 8.
    Oltedal, Siv
    et al.
    Universitetet i Stavanger.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Local family definitions matter2015In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 9. Oltedal, Siv
    et al.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Private and public families: Social workers’ views on children’s and parents’ position in Chile, England, Lithuania and Norway2019In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 115-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social workers around the world work with families and family complexities in their everyday practice. In this cross-national study, we explore social workers’ family intervention practices related to family definitions and functions, and how social workers balance children’s and parents’ rights and social policies in the proper context. Data derives from focus group interviews with child welfare workers from Norway, Lithuania, Chile and England based on discussions of a common fictitious complex family case (vignette). The four countries chosen for this comparative study are examples of four different welfare systems/regimes. The findings related to this broad area of caring topics are related to how the dimensions of a ‘private’ and a ‘public’ family manifest in social work in the four countries. Social workers in Chile and Lithuania refer to the idea of the private family, while their Norwegian counterparts lean more to the public family. English social workers combine public and private family conceptions in their focus groups, reflecting a system that is partly de-familialized.

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  • 10.
    Oltedal, Siv
    et al.
    Department of Social Studies, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The use of vignettes in an international comparative social work research: In-practice and on-practice reflections on practices2023In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 236-248Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to reflect on the strengths and challenges in qualitative comparative research on personal social services. The specific methodological approach that these reflections emerge from is the application of case vignettes in focus group interviews with social workers, working in different welfare regimes.

    We describe the process of vignette construction and implementation in focus group interviews, and relate this to findings in a large international project with researchers and data from Chile, Mexico, Norway, Sweden, Lithuania, Bulgaria, Ireland and the UK.

    Findings reveal that some globally spread professional norms prevail when they are applied locally, while others are more formed through welfare systems with strong contextual norms and legal and socio-economic barriers. Furthermore, the project showed that to use case vignettes and focus groups, in order to compare ‘social work’ in its totality between countries, is really difficult. It appears more fruitful to use such research methods to compare subsectors and sub-disciplines instead of social work as a whole. The strength of the data retrieved from the study is that it makes it possible to separate information on actual practice from information on principles and system norms, thus providing in-practice and on-practice reflections.

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  • 11.
    Oltedal, Siv
    et al.
    Universitetet i Stavanger.
    Pena, Angela
    University of Havana.
    Hean, Sarah C.P.D.
    Universitetet i Stavanger.
    Work division processes in social work with Cuban and Norwegian families2019In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 14, p. 165-190Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 11 of 11
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